WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Mike Breen 01.14.2014 100 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, CEAs at 09:49 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Last Day for Cincinnati Entertainment Awards Voting

Plus, The Tillers plan tribute to their late bassist at the Jan. 26 CEA ceremony

Voting for the 17th annual Cincinnati Entertainment Awards, celebrating the best of the Greater Cincinnati music scene, ends TONIGHT at midnight. Click here to cast your ballot for your favorite nominated local artists. The CEA ceremony is set for Sunday, Jan. 26, at Covington’s Madison Theater. The show/party will feature performances from CEA-nominated artists Honey & Houston, Moonbow, The Yugos, The Upset Victory, Valley High, The Almighty Get Down and DAAP Girls, as well as a secret opening performance by an entity known (as of now) only as Saint Ain't Mangled Angels (those who read CityBeat regularly will likely be able decipher the thinly-veiled pseudonym).Also added to the run of show for the CEA event is a special performance by Cincinnati Folk trio The Tillers, who released their fantastic Hand on the Plow album and toured the U.K. with Pokey LaFarge in 2013. The group, nominated for CEAs in the Folk/Americana, Album of the Year and Artist of the Year categories, will be paying tribute to their former bassist Jason Soudrette, who lost his battle with acute myeloid leukemia late last year.  Click here to purchase advanced tickets to the 2014 Cincinnati Entertainment Awards. Proceeds benefit the Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation.
 
 
by Mike Breen 10.25.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 11:38 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: Escondido, Dopapod and More

• Nashville’s Escondido came together quickly but very naturally. The project of Jessica Maros and Tyler James (a solo artist who has also toured as pianist for Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros) got its start in James’ home studio when he was recording an artist with whom both were friends. During a recording break, Maros, a Vancouver native and successful clothing/jewelry designer, was casually playing a song in the studio, James hit “record,” added some light ornamentation and, essentially, Escondido was born. That night, the two decided to make an album. Fittingly, the album — Esondido’s debut, titled The Ghost of Escondido — was recorded live in just one day with a handful of talented Nashville friends/musicians, even though it sounds incredibly cohesive, full-bodied and organic.  The making of the full-length, released at the start of this year, was driven by the spirit of Ennio Morricone, the legendary spaghetti western soundtrack genius, and that desert-sunset atmosphere meshes beautifully with the band’s mix of Indie Rock, Pop and Country. The end result is mesmerizing, a hazy, dreamy collection of haunted, mysterious soundscapery and spine-tingling harmonies and vocals, making the band reminiscent of a slightly twangier, more dynamic and grounded Mazzy Star. Along with garnering a wide-range of supporters, from the tastemakers at KCRW to the writers at Vogue, The Ghost of Escondido also made a fan out of eccentric filmmaker/artist/writer/musician David Lynch, who wrote about his love for the band in Mojo magazine. Here’s the music video for Escondido’s “Black Roses.” The duo (fleshed out by a full touring band) performs a free show tonight at MOTR Pub in Over-the-Rhine. New York City’s Indie Pop/Garage Rock group Unicycle Loves You opens the show at 10 p.m. • Tonight at Covington’s Madison Theater is a good chance to hear what a “Jam Band” sounds like in 2013, as several groups join forces for an all-ages, 8 p.m. show. Or, rather, you’ll hear how almost no two “Jam Bands” sound alike anymore, making the Grateful Dead-mimicking cliches about the scene completely outdated. Today, the “Jam” tag has less real meaning than ever, with the groups earning the descriptor exploring a huge range of styles. Jam Bands now often share little more than a tendency to improvise.  Headliners Dopapod epitomize the diversity of the modern Jam scene with their progressive blend of Electronic music, Jazz, Rock, Soul, Funk and various other styles. The Brooklyn, N.Y., group released its third studio album, Redivider, late last year, introducing fans to a Dopapod first — vocals (previously, the band was all instrumental). Read Brian Baker’s preview of the show for CityBeat here.  The support lineup for Dopapod is a varied collection of mostly local bands that reflect the same kind of sonic adventurousness as the headliners, though, of course, each bringing their own slant — Ethosine, Nevele, Us Today, Freeform Connection, Peridoni, Aliver Hall and Blue Moon Soup. Tickets are $15 at the door. • Though they never reaped the full rewards and commercial success that some bands that came after them did, Michigan’s Mustard Plug was one of the early guiding forces behind the ’90s Punk Ska explosion. The band put out its first album, Skapocalypse Now!, on cassette in 1992 and moved up to third-wave Ska’s version of 2 Tone Records, NYC’s Moon Records, for its second full-length, kicking off two decades of hardcore international touring.  Mustard Plug later joined the roster of Hopeless Records, which would go on to become one of the top independent Punk labels in the country. While the vast majority of Ska Punk bands from the ’90s either moved on to another style of music or imploded after the “craze” died down, Mustard Plug continues to write new songs, put out new music and tour on a regular basis, its loyal cult of fans proving that, while you won’t hear it on the radio anymore, there is still an audience hungry for Ska Punk done well. Mustard Plug has been operating D.I.Y. since parting ways with Hopeless; a new album (the band’s first since 2007’s In Black and White) is reportedly finished and due soon thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign. Mustard Plug plays a free show tonight at Northside Tavern. Opening is Cincinnati’s Elysian Souls. • October is coming to an end, which means Rocktober is also almost over and Rocktober on the Square, a new every-Friday concert series at downtown’s Fountain Square, is winding down as well. Today at 5 p.m., the final Rocktober on the Square show starts with a set from great, rootsy singer/songwriter Josh Eagle.  In the 6 p.m. slot is singer/songwriter Mike Oberst of popular Cincy Folk group The Tillers, who are heading overseas for their first ever U.K. tour, playing Nov. 1-16 throughout England, Scotland and Ireland as support for Pokey LaFarge.  The always fantastic 500 Miles to Memphis closes out Rocktober at 7 p.m. It’s the rowdy, rootsy rockers’ last local show of the year; the 500MTM fellas are taking a break from performing to go back into the studio to finish their next album.  Rocktober on the Square is a free event. Click here for more info. </iframe</p> <p class="p1">• Don’t forget — the One More Girl on a Stage benefit concerts continue today after last night’s kickoff at various venues in Over-the-Rhine. The OMG fest takes over the Southgate House Revival in Newport for a “whole house” show tonight. Here are complete details.</p> <p class="p2"><i>Click here for even more live music options tonight in Greater Cincinnati. </i></p></body></html>• Don’t forget — the One More Girl on a Stage benefit concerts continue today after last night’s kickoff at various venues in Over-the-Rhine. The OMG fest takes over the Southgate House Revival in Newport for a “whole house” show tonight starting at 7 p.m. Go here for complete details.Click here for even more live music options in Greater Cincinnati tonight.
 
 

Built to Last

Blues/Rock/Soul ensemble Tedeschi Trucks Band headlines the inaugural Ohio River Throwdown

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Blues/Rock/Soul ensemble Tedeschi Trucks Band, fresh off of their chart-busting album release, Made Up Mind, headlines the inaugural Ohio River Throwdown, alongside Los Lobos, JJ Grey & Mofro, JC Brooks and the Uptown Sound and many other American Roots music all-stars.   

The Tillers Plow Forward on Fifth LP Release

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 3, 2013
Folk trio The Tillers, one of the more popular and respected original groups in Greater Cincinnati, will release their new album this Friday at Newport’s Southgate House Revival, in the venue’s Sanctuary performance space.   
by Mike Breen 05.17.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Festivals, Local Music at 02:07 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music at Saturday's OTR Summer Celebration

Washington Park set to come alive with art, live music and a 5K run

Tomorrow (Saturday) is the seventh annual OTR (that's "Over-the-Rhine," if you don't get the hip lingo) 5K Run and Summer Celebration, featuring a fine art show, food, drink and other vendors, the 5K Run and a strong lineup of local, original music in OTR's Washington Park. The festivities kick off with the 10 a.m. OTR 5K, which begins and ends at Washington Park this year. Here are the artists — including several Cincinnati Entertainment Awards nominees and winners — you can check out (on the park's Bandstand and Main Event Lawn Stage) this year. (Click each name for more info on the performer.)• The Cincy Brass (Event Lawn Stage 10:15am-11:30am)• Baoku & the Image Afro-Beat Band (Event Lawn Stage 12:00pm-12:45pm)• DAAP Girls (Event Lawn Stage 1:15pm-2:00pm)• Decker, the solo guise of Histoire singer Jane Smith. (Event Lawn Stage 2:30pm-3:15pm)• The Tillers (Bandstand 11:30am-12:15pm)• Mia Carruthers (Bandstand 12:45pm-1:30pm)There will also be the following "special appearances":Young Professionals Choral Collective (Bandstand 10:45am-11:15am)Cincinnati Opera (Bandstand 2:00pm-2:20pm)Queen City Brass Band (Bandstand 2:45pm-3:30pm) Click here for more info.
 
 
by mbreen 11.15.2012
 
 
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Music Tonight: Earth, Iris Dement and More

• Instrumental Avant Metal veterans Earth bring their adventurous, spontaneous Dronecore to downtown tonight for a hypnosis session at the Ballroom at the Taft Theatre. Showtime is 8:30 pm. Stebmo, Earth collaborator and progressive Jazz pianist/multi-instrumentalist/composer Steve Moore, and psychedelic, noisy Doom duo Eagle Twin open the show. Tickets are $15.Guitarist Dylan Carlson gave birth to Earth in Olympia, Wash., circa 1990, and remains the only original member in a band that has seen numerous lineup and stylistic shifts. The group put a pair of albums out on Sub Pop during the "Grunge Revolution" (which they had little in common with), got booted from the label briefly and then welcomed back for three more albums. While Earth's aggressively experimental sound didn't quite fit the Grunge buzz, the group actually used the genre's concept of "slowed down Hard Rock and Metal" and took it to the extreme, decelerating even more and replacing Grunge's Punk and Garage influence with inspiration from avant grade composers and musicians and Carlson's singular vision.Earth didn't survive the ’90s but returned in the early ’00s to start a run that has included several releases for Southern Lord Records, a haven for "Metal" artists on the more experimental side of the music. Earth's latest release is the improvised Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light II, the follow-up to part I (and actually recorded at the same time) which has been praised for its gradual, natural exploration of different tones and approaches. Earth's trippy, glacial sound on Demons of Light II is infused with evocative cello and smoky atmospherics and often sounds like a new slant on modern Jazz, something Mingus might have come up with had he been into Black Sabbath. Here's Demons II track "The Corascene Dog":• Acclaimed by both fellow artists, critics and her dedicated fan base, Iris Dement  has been one of the more compelling singers in the Americana movement since she put out her first album in 1992; her mesmerizing voice has a timeless soul that recalls the best early Country female vocalists. Dement's sound has evolved and taken detours over time. After two straight-forward Country/Folk Pop LPs, the 1996 album The Way I Should showcased a Rock vibe and some serious political commentary. She followed that up by collaborating with John Prine on his In Spite of Ourselves album, which scored her a Grammy nomination, but Dement took a break from music after that. In 2004, Dement returned with her first album in eight years, Lifeline, released on her own label after her Warner Brothers contract expired. But Lifeline was primarily a collection of centuries'-old Gospel covers. This year, Dement released Sing the Delta, her first album of new material in 16 years. The songs harken back to that purity of her first couple of albums, but also shows how Dement has matured as a composer and performing. She writes with more confidence and has become an even better lyricist, creating an album that is mournful, poignant and poetic. Dement performs tonight at the 20th Century Theatre in Oakley with The Tillers, one of Cincy's finest Folk acts who are coming off of a successful release party for their recent live album. Showtime is 8 p.m. and tickets are $25-$30. Here's DeMent's "Go On Ahead and Go Home" from Delta. • Milwaukee-based Psych rockers Moss Folk perform a free show tonight at MOTR Pub in Over-the-Rhine with like-minded locals Children of the Emerald Fire. Showtime is 10 p.m. Formed in Michigan in the mid-’00s by founder Andrew James Shelp, Moss Folk entrancingly collages influences into a sound that draws from a wide range of music that could fall into the "Psychedelic" category. You'll hear elements of Kraut Rock, Pink Floyd, World music, Tangerine Dream and Spacemen 3 mingling in Moss Folk's ambient, hypnotic melange and the band has been known to match the lysergic sonics with fitting visuals (from video projections to cameos by various non-musical performing artists). Here's a live clip of Moss Folk: moss folk - red from brownshoesonly on Vimeo.• Tennessee ElectroJam/Livetronica trio Arpetrio performs tonight at The Mad Frog in Corryville. The show starts at 9 p.m. with locals Don't Fear the Satellites. Admission is $5. Bringing their Rock and Jazz chops together with a creative technological prowess, guitarist/keyboardist Alex Mindermann, bassist Trent Little and drummer Wes Taylor have performed with the likes of EOTO, Papadosio and RJD2, as well as at numerous Jam fests across the country. The group's fluid sound and deft use of loops, synths and samplers puts them on par with some of the bigger artists making this kind of warm, spontaneous, beat-heavy Trance/Fusion (Sound Tribe Sector 9, The Werks, Big Gigantic, etc.). Click below to sample the group's 2012 release Triggology, then click here to download your very own copy for free. Triggology by ArpetrioClick here for even more live music events tonight in Greater Cincinnati.
 
 

The Tillers’ Fond ‘Farewell’ Is a Brilliant Re-Introduction

Plus notes on The Heights Music Festival, a Cincinnati Music Heritage Foundation benefit and a Culture Queer release party

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 7, 2012
Folk faves The Tillers celebrate the release of a new live album recorded at the former Southgate House with a release party at the new Southgate House Revival.   
by Mike Breen 08.24.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals, Music Video at 09:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Whispering Beard Folk Festival Starts NOW

Fifth annual celebration of Americana/Folk music new and old begins today

The summer music festival season is winding down, but area fans of Americana/Folk/Roots music of varying stripes have a big one to look forward to this weekend, as the fifth annual Whispering Beard Folk Festival returns to the Old Mill Campground in nearby Friendship, Ind., starting in just a few hours.Founded in 2008, Whispering Beard has showcased both the old and new guard of Americana, mixing legends, contemporary favorites and lots of Greater Cincinnati area artists. This year is no exception; in fact, it may be the best lineup yet. Check the full rundown of performers below, as well as video clips from each day's headliners. FRIDAY11:30 a.m. Easy Tom Eby12:20 p.m. Red Cedards1:10 p.m. Ben Knight2 p.m. Arlo McKinley and the Lonesome Sound2:50 p.m. Rattlesnakin' Daddies3:45 Kentucky Struts4:40 p.m. Sassy Molasses5:35 p.m. Al Scorch6:30 p.m. Frontier Folk Nebraska 7:30 p.m. Charlie Parr8:30 p.m. Pokey LaFarge and the South City 3 9:30 p.m. Whiskey Bent Valley Boys10:30 p.m. Langhorne Slim Langhorne Slim - The Way We Move from Langhorne Slim on Vimeo.SATURDAY11:30 a.m. Jive Creek Ramblers12:20 p.m. Billy Catfish1:10 p.m. Terminal Union2 p.m. My Brother the Bear2:50 p.m. Shiny & the Spoon3:45 p.m. Jeremy Pinnell & the 55s4:40 p.m. Josh Eagle and the Harvest City5:35 p.m. Henhouse Prowlers6:30 p.m. Bloodroots Barter 7:25 p.m. Chicago Farmer8:20 p.m. Caitlin Rose9:20 p.m. The Tillers10:20 p.m. Justin Townes EarleSUNDAY 11 a.m. Rabbit Hash String Band11:50 a.m. The Blue Rock Boys12:40 p.m. Mt. Pleasant String Band1:30 p.m. Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers2:25 p.m. Uncle Mike Carr 3:20 p.m. Magnolia Mountain 4:20 p.m. Ramblin' Jack Elliott (check out CityBeat's interview with the Folk legend here)Weekend passes are $70 (it’s $40 for just Friday and Saturday and $20 for just Sunday). All-weekend on-site camping costs $40 or you can camp off-site for free (while spaces last). Old Mill Campground is about an hour west of downtown Cincinnati. Here's a map from Fountain Square to Friendship.View Larger MapFor complete info on this year’s Whispering Beard Folk Festival, visit www.whisperingbeard.com.
 
 

Southgate House … Revived

The returns of the Southgate and Whispering Beard festival, plus a tribute to Bones

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 22, 2012
A “new” Southgate House is booking shows and nearly ready to open for business. The new Southgate House Revival is located at another historic Newport property, the former Grace Methodist Episcopal Church and opens for business Oct. 5.  
by Deirdre Kaye 07.16.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals, Music Video at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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Bunburied Alive … and Lovin' It

Reflections on the final day of the inaugural Bunbury Music Festival

I’ve been to more festivals than I care to recall, but they mostly pale in comparison to Bunbury’s inaugural weekend. The planners of the three-day Cincinnati festival scored awesome bands for a first-year festival and the location couldn’t have been more spectacular, stretching from Sawyer Point to Yeatman's Cove along the riverfront.Bonnaroo sucks because there are hardly any trees and therefore no shade — it’s like spending a weekend on the sun. While the fairly awesome, Memphis in May offers a similar riverside locale, but it’s also missing the shade and it fails to take full advantage of its riverfront property. The Bunbury planners nailed it. Not only does Sawyer Point offer plenty of tree-covered walkways between stages, but also grassy knolls, flushing toilets and a great breeze. And the Landor Stage! Whatever genius said, “Let’s put a stage at the base of the Serpentine Wall,” deserves a raise. The river and Big Mac Bridge were excellent backdrops for the bands lucky enough to play there and a great way to show off some of Cincy's charm to festival goers from afar. I saw Good Old War perform to a packed … "wall," and it was by far the coolest and most laidback of the shows I caught. Watching everyone lounge around on the huge concrete steps while listening to the trio play music and goof off was a great break from the shuffling and shifting crowds just a few feet behind us. The band's drummer did a pretty great impersonation of Harry Belafonte and sang “Day-o” for us, which worked well with the sunny sky and chilled-out vibes on the wall. Even better was how loud the crowd got when he sang, “Daylight come and me wanna go home.” Hardly anyone knew the rest of the words, but they had fun pretending. Good Old War was probably my favorite performance and Landor Stage was definitely my favorite place to hang out.Another great way Bunbury made sure to represent the Cincinnati spirit was with tons of local food and beer. Not only did they have the big names, like Skyline and LaRosa’s, but they also brought in places like Taste of Belgium and beer from Hudy. (Sure, some UDF or Graeter’s would have also been nice, but it was only the first year.)Speaking of food, I was overwhelmed by the lack of food I saw on the ground, neither dropped nor regurgitated. Cincinnati did an excellent job at keeping their park clean, even when they flooded it with feet. I was super proud (and relieved) to not have to step over any up-chucked chilli on my way various jaunts from one end of the park to the other.And that’s a trek I made quite a few times, too. From The Tillers to Good Old War and then back to the far end to see Bad Veins, I spent a good deal of my Sunday slipping through the crowds to get from one end of the point to the other as quickly as possible.  It was worth it, though, especially for The Tillers!I own The Tillers’ first two albums, but I’d only seen them once before, at one of their usual spots — Northside Tavern. It was a night where they went on late and I happened to be with more introverted friends. It was a good show, but it lacked the oomph I experienced at Bunbury. Those boys were made to play in the sunshine and trees, that’s for sure. And Cincinnati made sure to show love to their hometown band. Hopefully, Mike, Sean and Aaron picked, bowed and bellowed their ways into some new hearts, as well. Their show sealed the deal on The Tillers being one of the many reasons why I love Cincinnati. We’re the kind of people where their kind of music can be properly loved and respected for exactly what it is and never expected to be anything more.Those were the highlights of my day, but I’d say the whole experience was a good one. Musically, there were really only two downsides to the fest and they were both pretty personal. To begin with, I think Neon Trees really lose their appeal in the daylight. They are everything that’s glowing, neon or flashing. They sing songs that, when sung along to, require sassy facial expressions and overly dramatized hand gestures. These are things that are best done in the dark. I also wasn’t thrilled with Death Cab for Cutie, though I know I’m in the minority on that one. Here’s the thing, though:  “I Will Possess Your Heart” is really freaking creepy and “I Will Follow You into the Dark” is the exact opposite of the kind of love I want. I’m fairly certain anyone who’s ever been the person least committed to a relationship will understand my sentiment.Still. Those things were minor. Most important is that Sunday was a good day and Bunbury, in my summation, was a huge success.Writer’s note: There were a few things I thought worth mentioning but not worthy of the effort of a more fluid insertion into the above review. I’d like to add the following whimsy, as long as I won’t be sacked. Otherwise, just leave it off. (Editor's note: These are hilarious. You get a raise — two free movie passes next week!)• Apparently making cut-offs from Mom jeans is a fashion trend. I reject this.• Next year I’d like to rent a boat and spend one afternoon experiencing Bunbury from the river with the rest of the freeloaders.• Seriously. I’m really proud of you for not puking in public.• To the lady in the wheelchair with her legs stuck directly out in front of her: Are you sure you couldn’t find an even less convenient position in which to ride? (Editor's note: This may be offensive; see me.)• I saw a New Kids on the Block tattoo and I still have no idea how I feel about it.• Can we try to get an ice company to sponsor a stage next year? I really hate my beverage lukewarm.• I’d still prefer a festival that took place in December or January. (Name suggestions: Bit Nipple-y Concert Series and Freeze Your Balls Off Fest)Click here for our photo gallery by Jesse Fox featuring over 150 shots from Bunbury weekend. And keep checking the music blog for more post-game coverage. Sorry for the delay — r tender li'l brains got a bit frieded dis weakened.
 
 

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