WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Bluegrass for a Good Cause

Plus, King Records Month continues and more

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 18, 2013
Bluegrass for Babies, featuring local artists Wild Carrot and Comet Bluegrass All-Stars, returns to Sawyer Point Saturday to raise money for the Perinatal Institute at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Plus, King Records Month continues, CityBeat hosts a pre-MidPoint Music Festival party, Jerry's Little Band turns 20 and Abiyah Presents Hip Hop @ The Comet presents a special "open mic" edition.  

The Cla-Zels Rock on Second LP of 2012

Plus, Robthebank returns, Play It Forward presents photo show and Mark Ultey nests in Price Hill

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 5, 2012
Diverse local foursome The Cla-Zels release their second full-length album this weekend, Robthebank returns with new LP after decade-plus break, Play It Forward presents a Rock & Roll photo show at The Redmoor and Mark Utley nests in Price Hill with some of his very talented friends.   

Eilen Jewell

Sept. 6 • The Redmoor

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 4, 2012
To her infinite credit, Eilen Jewell has never been tempted to churn out a sanitized and commercially viable version of Country with a view toward success and fame.  
by Deirdre Kaye 02.21.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Reviews at 03:31 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
mikedoughty_432-large

Review: Mike Doughty at The Redmoor

There are certain musicians that have such unique, stirring voices, sometimes I want to press my fingers to their necks and feel the vibrations. Mike Doughty has one of those voices. He has a natural reverberation that makes every syllable sound like it traveled up through a canyon in his throat. That’s why Soul Coughing was such a success and, undoubtedly, a big reason for the packed-in crowd at Mount Lookout club The Redmoor Sunday night. Billed as a "concert/reading/Q&A tour," when Doughty wasn’t bringing the room to near silence during his songs, he was happy to keep the crowd laughing. He read portions of his memoir, The Book of Drugs, sharing stories about his bandmates, tour life and run-ins with a clown and some Mexicans in California. He answered “gnarly questions” about Soul Coughing (his former band), shamed a drunk guy and heckled hecklers.Doughty rose to fame in the late ‘90s with Soul Coughing. By the 2000s, the band had broken up. After battles with his former band members, drugs and alcohol, Doughty set out on his own. The Book of Drugs tells of those battles, while his latest album, Yes and Also Yes, takes Doughty on a path to further distance himself from those former demons. He no longer performs Soul Coughing material, but Doughty's entertaining presentation didn't need those old songs. He performed with only his guitar and one-of-a-kind voice to a room full of perfectly content fans.Following every one of the dozen or so songs he performed, Doughty expressed his gratitude with a “Thank you very much.” He accepted shouted comments graciously, but shied away from what appeared to be the beginning of a long-winded comment by assuring everyone that the show wasn’t about him. It was about the crowd and entertaining them. Doughty had no hearts to win over with his humor, sincerity or flawless show -— this adoring crowd already belonged to him. But he put his heart into his answers and his music, anyway. Mike Doughty treated his fans like his friends, which is the kindest way to treat a human.On behalf of everyone there: Thank you, very much, Mike Doughty.
 
 

Patty Larkin

April 14 • The Redmoor

0 Comments · Friday, April 8, 2011
If you surf the web and scan the blogosphere with enough regularity, you’ll find chat-box commentary from testosterone-addled mooks professing that women are incapable of being great guitarists. Patty Larkin certainly heard it enough times over the course of her long career and, even though she’s disproved it with every single note she’s ever played on every album she’s released, she found it necessary to find some equally, differently and exquisitely gifted women and compile them in a 2005 collection she titled La Guitara.  

Lucy Kaplansky

May 21 • The Redmoor

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 18, 2010
Lucy Kaplansky's musical journey began in 1978, when the Chicago native chose to skip college and then carved out a niche for herself in the Greenwich Village Folk scene, where she met and worked with budding stars like Shawn Colvin, Suzanne Vega and Richard Shindell. Working as a part-time session musician, she finally recorded her debut solo album, 'The Tide,' in 1994 (assisted by Colvin). With the great notices that followed, Kaplansky's path was set; she shuttered her psychology practice and became a full-time musician.  

Wade to Go

Wade Baker's submersion into the local Jazz scene (and beyond) has made him a key part of it

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 8, 2009
Wade Baker recently nabbed his first CEA nomination in the Jazz category, but he's a pervasive presence throughout Cincinnati's music scene. In addition to playing trumpet with a rotating cast of Jazz luminaries in the Wade Baker Jazz Collaboration, he's toured with Hip Hop/Jazz/Jam locals Eclipse, provided bass for Blues cat Jon Justice for the past three years and has a regular gig with the veteran Blue Birds Big Band. And that's just a partial list.  

entheos (Profile)

Trip Hop/Electronic trio returns with new EP and an honest vision

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 8, 2009
Entheos' sophomore EP, 'Sense,' was recorded by a slew of talented sound engineers. Sister-and-brother Alison and Carl Shepard share vocals, pushing out soaring angelic harmonies, altering leads. With more electric guitar and Justin Webb's drumming on this release, the overall feel is fuller and more intense than their previous work.   

Bobby Broom

Aug. 20 • The Redmoor

0 Comments · Monday, August 17, 2009
Guitarist Bobby Broom might not have the kind of high profile that some of his Jazz contemporaries enjoy, but he has the kind of résumé that would make a good many of them green with envy. He's worked with an astonishing array of Jazz greats while maintaining an acclaimed solo presence on the road and in the studio with his two groups, the Bobby Broom Trio and the Deep Blue Organ Trio.  

0|1
 
Close
Close
Close