What should I be doing instead of this?
 
 

Appreciating the Art and Soul of Film Criticism

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 24, 2016
Last week, I joined the legion of readers descending, en masse, upon bookstores and Amazon for a chance to delve into New York Times film critic A. O. Scott’s Better Living Through Criticism: How to Think About Art, Pleasure, Beauty, and Truth.   

On Second Thought...

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 22, 2015
Liberal commentators in diverse news media with whom I generally agree tend to suffer SSDD (Same Stuff, Different Day). Conservatives, however, are endlessly creative when it comes to their abilities to stoke anger and fear.  

Media Musings From Cincinnati and Beyond

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 15, 2014
New York Times in-house critic, public editor Margaret Sullivan, says the Times is re-embracing jingoism that supported America’s attack on Saddam Hussein 11 years ago.   

Peeking Inside the Department of 'Corections'

0 Comments · Monday, October 11, 2010
My favorite reading includes corrections. Everyone errs. Some admit it and correct their errors. Graphs, maps and percentages figure prominently in corrections, but names of people and places most often seem to trip us up. Get a name wrong, and it becomes journalism history if not local legend. Unless it's corrected, others reporters may rely on that spelling and get into all kinds of trouble.   

Does the Media's Obsession With 24/7 Breaking News Compromise Law Enforcement?

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 11, 2010
In the Good Old Days, journalists generally held a story if authorities said it could compromise the stakeout, chase or anticipated capture of a suspect. Even if we knew where agents were headed or or stood with them outside a motel where a kidnapper and victim were hidden, we responded with silence. These issues arose again when the 24/7-obsessed news media unthinkingly helped the Times Square bombing suspect almost escape.   

The Most Dangerous Man in America (Review)

Daniel Ellsberg/Pentagon Papers documentary has disturbing parallels to current day

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 17, 2010
This Oscar-nominated documentary looks at the events that compelled Daniel Ellsberg, a former Marine and defense department staffer, to leak the Pentagon Papers to The New York Times in an effort to stop what he deemed an unjust Vietnam War. Ellsberg's articulate first-person narration and unique personal history give the film an intimacy and emotional depth lacking in most political/historical documentaries. Grade: A-.  

2010 Predictions for the World of Media

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 5, 2010
Local journalists aren't exempt from the love/hate generated by the command to compile lists of top stories at the end of each year or decade. More than anything, it's a chance to remind everyone how smart they were when they wrote the first draft of what's become history. But rather than remind you of my failings in the past year or decade, let me suggest what 2010 might hold for the news media.  

Does Free News Content on the Web Still Make Sense?

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 29, 2009
Let's make this column local local or, as the new conventional wisdom sometimes puts it, hyperlocal: How much would you pay to read The Enquirer online if it quit being free? Or, if the main news section remains free online, which features would you pay for: Op-ed columnists? Tweets? Blogs? Moms? Are you willing to give The Enquirer your credit card and let them nick you for every article you pull from behind the pay-to-read wall? Lots of other dailies are gingerly sticking their toes in the roiled water of paid online content.  

AP, Daily Newspapers Trying to Make Web Freeloaders Pay

0 Comments · Tuesday, August 18, 2009
However you get your news online, you have an interest in moves by the Associated Press and others to prevent other online sites from using their content without paying. Fittingly, AP plans to use the technology that promotes wide freeloading to a general crackdown. It will tag and track its online content. That should discomfit aggregators and others who use AP stories, summaries or links to draw eyeballs and advertisers without paying or sharing ad revenue.  

Putting Journalists in Danger, Enquirer Firings and the Death of Robert McNamara

0 Comments · Monday, July 20, 2009
NBC's show 'The Wanted,' unites a reporter with a former U.S. Navy Seal and a former Army Green Beret in a hunt for fugitive war criminals and terrorists. Dumb. Too many people already see journalists as the enemy to be kidnapped, taken hostage or killed.  

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