WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Media Musings From Cincinnati and Beyond

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Obviously, the editor who wrote the headline on Wednesday’s Food cover page for the Enquirer didn’t read Polly Campbell’s story about the Woman’s City Club.    

Worst Week Ever! July 08-14

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 8, 2015
Many Americans grew sick and tired of University of Kentucky fans bragging and acting like they were the ones boxing out and draining three-pointers during the Wildcats’ impressive undefeated run through the regular college basketball season this year.  

Media Musings From Cincinnati and Beyond

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 17, 2015
It can’t be ignorance; I introduced an Enquirer reporter to the recently reopened Clifton Natural Foods on Ludlow months ago and told him how it was a return to almost the same spot after decades in Clifton Heights exile. But according to a co-owner of Clifton Natural Foods last week, the Enquirer hasn’t written a thing about this business success story or a merchant returning to her old neighborhood.  

Media Happenings at The Enquirer, WXIX & More

0 Comments · Monday, March 16, 2015
Lots of good stuff happened during the past fortnight. Rick Green returned to the Enquirer. He’s the new publisher. That puts a solid, veteran journalist and news executive at the top of our Sole Surviving Daily.  

The Enquirer's Fine Line Between Advertising and Journalism

0 Comments · Thursday, December 18, 2014
Holiday joy must be tinged with renewed survivors’ guilt at the Cincinnati Enquirer.   

Worst Week Ever!: Oct. 29-Nov. 4

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 5, 2014
For hundreds of years many people have looked to revered religious figures with big hats for guidance on how to be good people.  

Worst Week Ever!: Oct. 1-7

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 8, 2014
City of Cincinnati administrators are currently working on a parking plan to accommodate all the rich suburban folk who moved into Over-the-Rhine in the past few years.   
by German Lopez 11.04.2013
Posted In: News, Media at 01:08 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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'Enquirer' Circulation Declines Again

Numbers down more than 10 percent over the past year

Many of Ohio’s major newspapers, including The Cincinnati Enquirer, lost thousands of readers in the past year, but some managed to beat trends and gain in certain categories, according to a circulation audit from the Alliance for Audited Media. The audit found The Enquirer’s average daily circulation, which excludes Saturday and Sunday, down to 117,754 from 132,076 between September 2012 and September 2013. Sunday circulation fell to 235,515 from 262,876. The numbers represent a 10.8 percent decline in average daily circulation and 10.4 percent on Sundays.The Akron Beacon Journal and Youngstown Vindicator also saw negative trends, with average daily and Sunday circulation dropping. Cleveland’s The Plain Dealer lost some of its Sunday circulation, but comparable statistics weren’t available for average daily circulation because the newspaper transitioned from daily delivery to three-times-a-week delivery earlier in the year. But The Toledo Blade and Dayton Daily News actually increased their average daily and Sunday circulation. The Columbus Dispatch also upped its average daily circulation, but Sunday circulation fell.For newspapers, dropping circulation coincides with more readers getting their news from the Internet and alternative sources over the past few years. The alternatives have cost newspapers around the country readers and advertising revenue, and many have responded with cutbacks in staff and overall news coverage.  In August, The Enquirer moved and laid off staff from its Kentucky and West Chester offices. The layoffs came as parent company Gannett dismissed more than 400 workers around the country, according to estimates from Gannett Blog.Other media outlets appear to be taking advantage of the new vacancy. The Business Courier reported on Monday that Cox Media’s Journal-News is increasing its presence in Butler and Warren counties to compete with The Enquirer. The move follows Cox Media’s decision to merge its Hamilton and Middletown newspapers into a single entity that covers both cities and counties.
 
 
by German Lopez 08.02.2013
Posted In: News, Media at 02:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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‘Enquirer’ Restructures Kentucky, West Chester Offices

Parent company Gannett lays off 400-plus around nation

Although it’s moving staff out of its offices in Kentucky, The Cincinnati Enquirer intends to continue publishing a daily Kentucky edition with unique content for Northern Kentucky. Editor Steve Wilson was among those laid off from The Kentucky Enquirer yesterday. He will remain at the newspaper for four weeks, along with several colleagues who were also laid off. Wilson told CityBeat that The Enquirer isn’t backing away from its commitment to northern Kentucky, but acknowledges problems posed by the layoffs. “Clearly, all things being equal, you want to have reporters based in the area they’re covering. That just makes sense. Everybody would agree with that,” Wilson says. “But in this case, they apparently had their reasons that made sense to them.” Wilson won’t speculate on the reasons, but he cites cost concerns as an ongoing problem. “Gannett, like most companies, is very bottom-line-driven, and they had to do something to reduce expenses,” he says, pointing to the continuing trend of downsizing in the news industry. Following the demise of The Cincinnati Post in 2007, The Cincinnati Enquirer and its Kentucky edition made strides to appeal to northern Kentucky readers. One example: The newspaper stopped referring to the region as “Greater Cincinnati,” instead adopting “Greater Cincinnati and northern Kentucky” — a lede-unfriendly moniker that was meant to show The Enquirer was serious about reaching out.But a source close to The Enquirer who asked to remain anonymous questioned the success of those efforts, given yesterday’s layoffs. Gannett Blog claims 23 people were laid off at Enquirer offices, but it’s difficult to confirm the report because of Gannett’s secrecy with staffing issues. More than 400 people lost their jobs at Gannett newspapers around the nation, according to the blog. Based on information gathered so far, the local layoffs span through the Cincinnati and Kentucky versions of The Enquirer, Community Press and Community Recorder. A source close to the situation told CityBeat that eight reporters, two editors and one photographer are moving from the Kentucky offices to downtown Cincinnati, with the remaining Kentucky staff members laid off. Staff members were also moved from the newspaper’s West Chester office, which covered Butler and Warren counties.Original reports claimed the Kentucky and West Chester offices were closing, but they will apparently remain open for reporters in a limited capacity. The source gave the names of five people who were laid off: Wilson; Bill Cieslewicz, a mid-level editor; Jackie Demaline, theatre critic and arts writer; Paul McKibben, breaking news reporter; and Ealer Wadlington, listing coordinator. When asked about the layoffs, Gannett spokesperson Jeremy Gaines told journalism industry blogger Jim Romenesko, “Some USCP (U.S. Community Publishing) sites are making cuts to align their business plans with local market conditions.” The nationwide layoffs come a couple weeks after Gannett CEO Gracia Martore proudly claimed on July 22, “We are accelerating our transformation into the ‘New Gannett’ every day.”Updated on Nov. 4 at 12:03 p.m.: Added final layoff numbers from Gannett Blog.Updated on Aug. 6 at 11:13 a.m.: Added the latest layoff numbers from Gannett Blog.Updated on Aug. 6 at 10:47 a.m.: Reports now say that The Enquirer will keep its Kentucky and West Chester offices open in a limited capacity. The story was updated to reflect the latest news.
 
 

More Layoffs at ‘The Enquirer’

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 7, 2013
Although it’s moving staff out of its offices in Kentucky, The Cincinnati Enquirer intends to continue publishing a daily Kentucky edition with unique content for Northern Kentucky.   

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