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Rebels Of An Older Mold

Night Beats blaze their own trail by following a few already blazed

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 8, 2012
Carving your own upward path in the perpetually congested music biz is an intimidating enough prospect on its own. Yet Danny Lee ā€” the driving force behind Seatlle Psych Rock trio Night Beats ā€” has opted to one-up this great dare: He wants not just to create his bandā€™s own fanbase but also his own scene. Kinda. Maybe.   
by mbreen 10.22.2011
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 09:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
spindrift blog

Squeeze the Day(s) for 10/22-23

Spindrift, Bettye LaVette and The Sounds, plus This Weekend in Music

Music Saturday: There's a clinic on modern Psych Rock music at the Southgate House as three disparate practitioners team up for a  9:30 p.m., all-ages show. Headliners The Black Angels touch on the Velvet Underground brand of psychedelia, with droning hypnotics, as well as later artists like Spacemen 3 and Jesus and Mary Chain. D.C.'s Dead Meadow have been working their brand of hard-rocking trippiness for the past 13 years, while L.A.'s Spindrift make soundtracks for desert vision quests, influenced by the likes of The Doors, Hawkwind and Electronic music pioneer, Bruce Haack. The band's cinematic sound has been used to soundtrack several film projects (including the Tarantino-produced Hell Ride), and, this spring, the group released Classic Soundtracks Volume 1, featuring 14 themes from various scores, which were made into short films by various directors, touching on everything from Bollywood to film noir (the films, music videos and trailers from the project have been screened to a national audience on the IFC network). Check out a few examples from Spindrift's soundtracks project below. Tickets for tonight's show are $18 at the door.

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Desolation Angels

The Black Angels tweak their droning Psych Rock style on new album

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 13, 2011
The Black Angels’ music often sounds as if the world is coming to an end, which is just how singer Alex Maas likes it. The Austin, Texas-bred band has been spreading its ominous, reverb-drenched drones for more than five years now, along the way converting a flock of passionate followers who likewise believe that 1966 was popular music’s creative apex.  

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