WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Jac Kern 10.10.2014 45 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Food at 11:14 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ddd

Vine Street Restaurants Featured on Food Network Tonight

Taste of Belgium, Bakersfield and Senate on 'Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives'

Remember when Guy Fieri and his Flavortown mobile came to Cincinnati this summer to film Diners, Drive-ins and Dives? The Food Network star made appearances at several area restaurants from Corryville's Island Frydays and Northside's Melt to a bevy of spots in Over-the-Rhine. Melt and Island Frydays' segments have since aired; tonight, a special OTR-centric episode of DDD premieres.Vine Street eateries Senate, Bakersfield and Taste of Belgium will all be featured in this "One Street Wonders" episode. Typically three restaurants from three different cities are compiled in each episode; tonight, the entire episode will be devoted to OTR's Gateway Quarter. Tune into Food Network at 10 p.m. Go here for additional showtimes and recipes from Senate and Taste of Belgium.Diners Drive-ins and Dives is no stranger to Cincinnati. Before this summer's filming, Fieri had visited Terry's Turf Club, Blue Ash Chili and Virgil's Cafe for the show.
 
 
by German Lopez 11.12.2013
Posted In: News, Streetcar, City Council, Mayor at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Streetcar Supporters Launch Campaign to Save Project

Residents, business owners rally to lobby new mayor and council

Dozens of residents and business owners gathered in Over-the-Rhine on Tuesday to launch a campaign that seeks to persuade Mayor-elect John Cranley and the newly elected City Council to support the $133 million streetcar project. Attendees included Ryan Messer, who used his life savings to renovate his home in Over-the-Rhine; Derek Bauman, co-chair of Cincinnatians for Progress; Jean-Francois Flechet, owner of the Taste of Belgium; and Derek dos Anjos, owner of The Anchor. “We’re here today to keep the conversation going outside of political rhetoric and partisan politics,” Messer said. “Simply put, the streetcar is a component of Cincinnati economic development, and it’s a project that grows the whole city — not just an urban core, which, by the way, is an important part of developing this region.” The group intends to lobby Cranley and the newly elected council, which appear poised to cancel the project when they take office in December. At least three of nine elected council members — P.G. Sittenfeld, David Mann and Kevin Flynn — have told media outlets that they want a full accounting of the project before making a final decision. Another three — Chris Seelbach, Yvette Simpson and Wendell Young — are on the record as supporting the project. The final three — Christopher Smitherman, Charlie Winburn and Amy Murray — adamantly opposed the project in the past. Members of the pro-streetcar group invited Cranley and all elected council members to join them at a town hall-style meeting on Nov. 14 at the Mercantile Library, where supporters will discuss their path forward. So far, supporters have publicly discussed a concerted lobbying effort, a referendum if council passes an ordinance undoing the streetcar project and possible legal action. As CityBeat first uncovered, the costs of canceling the project are currently unknown, and some of the costs could actually fall on the operating budget that pays for police, firefighters and human services instead of the capital budget that is currently financing the streetcar project. Much of the uncertainty falls on ongoing construction for the streetcar, which has continued despite the newly elected city government’s intent to stop the project. As of September, the city spent $23 million on the project and contractually obligated $94 million, some of which city officials say will need to be paid back even if the project were canceled. The U.S. Department of Transportation also told city officials in a June 19 letter that nearly $41 million of nearly $45 million in federal grants would need to be returned if the project were terminated. Supporters also claim Cincinnati would be giving up a 2.7-to-1 return on investment over 35 years if the city abandoned the streetcar now. That estimate is derived from a 2007 study conducted by consulting firm HDR, which was evaluated and supported by the University of Cincinnati. Project executive John Deatrick says the HDR study is now outdated and the city is working on updating the numbers. Still, Deatrick says the project is intended to spur economic development, not just provide another form of public transportation. The Nov. 13 issue of CityBeat will give a more in-depth look at the campaign to save the streetcar and some of the people involved in the movement.
 
 

Symbiotic Systems

Kyle McGrath and Brad Ostendorf of URBTank strive to produce healthy, all-natural ingredients using aquaponics

2 Comments · Wednesday, July 17, 2013
Two 23-year-olds growing plants in an Over-the-Rhine basement sounds like the beginnings of a Seth Rogen blockbuster, but housed in a six-story Apex warehouse on McMicken Avenue is the newest contribution to Cincinnati’s sustainable agriculture initiative.    

It’s the Great Pumpkin, People

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 24, 2012
I just read in New York magazine that pumpkin is the new bacon. They may be on to something. Listen to this shopping list a friend just posted on Facebook: pumpkin coffee, pumpkin oatmeal, pumpkin cream cheese, pumpkin butter, pumpkin cider and pumpkin-chip biscotti. Eat that and you’re likely to start glowing all orangey.  

Waffles of Freedom!

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 20, 2011
Did you even know that there was a café at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center? Neither did Jean Francois Flechet until he had a chance to propose opening a satellite site of his Belgian waffle empire there. Well, maybe Taste of Belgium hasn’t reached empire status, but it’s certainly growing in local impact.  

Market Tested, Market Approved

Feasting at Findlay Market is time well spent

0 Comments · Monday, March 29, 2010
If you haven't been to Findlay Market lately, you're in for some surprises. Sure, if you're a home cook or even a professional chef, the market is a great place for fresh, local ingredients. Now more than ever, though, the market has become a place to eat, with ever expanding options for ready-to-eat meals, either at home or on the spot.  

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