WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Class of '83

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 14, 2013
When that summer was over we got our black asses on the bus. We expected the worst. We rode the bus stiff-backed, ready for all-out race war. We weren’t comforted by our white bus driver’s choice of WEBN on the radio.  

The Kids Aren’t Alright

Group working to develop free anti-bullying program

1 Comment · Tuesday, May 1, 2012
In the idyllic world of TV sitcoms, bullying among school-age youth usually entails some name-calling and maybe the exchange of a few punches. The problem is fixed within 30 minutes or an hour, usually with some sage words of wisdom dispensed by an adult. Cue commercial. Bullying in the real world, however, isn’t so easily remedied.   

Differing Forecasts

Union: CPS using faulty budget model to make cuts

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Cincinnati’s beleaguered public school system, faced with a projected $43 million budget gap for next year, slashed 10 percent of its teaching staff April 17. In a special session, the school board voted unanimously to eliminate at least 237 jobs, saving the district around $20 million.    

'Bully' Shines a Cold, Harsh Light on Social Blindness

5 Comments · Tuesday, April 17, 2012
To say that we need to address the topic of bullying in our schools, communities and society at large should mean that the Weinstein Company’s efforts to drum up controversy (and publicity) surrounding their battle with the MPAA over the rating of Lee Hirsch’s documentary, Bully, have worked.    

Class Is In Session at School of Rock Mason

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 11, 2012
The latest edition of the School of Rock franchise — which has 80 other schools for young, aspiring Rock musicians in the U.S. and Mexico — opens this weekend in Mason. Like the other facilities, School of Rock Mason provides lessons for students ages 7-18, including the chance to play real venues in front of real audiences.    
by Hannah McCartney 03.08.2012
Posted In: Education, Governor at 12:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
kasich1

School Director Says Re-Testing Teachers Won't Help Schools

Kasich mandate to affect 10 percent of Ohio public schools, cost $2.1 million

Gov. John Kasich’s budget plan called for several large reforms to fill an $8 billion hole in the state budget, but it appears teachers are facing the brunt of Kasich’s larger changes. Aside from cutting funding statewide for K-12 education, the plan mandates a reform not seen by educators in any other state: required licensing tests for already-employed teachers at schools ranking in the lowest 10 percentiles of Performance Index (PI) score come September. The PI of a given school is measured by its students’ achievement and Ohio General Test (OGT) test performance for grades 3 through 10. Schools with the lowest PIs (the scale ranks from 0-120) are designated on “Academic Watch” or “Academic Emergency,” which suggests that an overall student population is not meeting the state’s performance expectations. Core subjects examined include reading, English language arts, math, science, government, economics, history, fine arts, foreign language and geography. The next state report cards to monitor PI will be released in August. Find old report cards here. Kasich says that re-testing teachers is a way to hold them more accountable for their performance and help school administrators highlight ineffective teachers for removal. Those who oppose the reform say Kasich is placing too much weight on the teachers, when other factors in performance include community, family life and the students themselves.  PACE High School, a charter school focused on dropout recovery in Bond Hill, is one of several Cincinnati schools ranking in that bottom 10 percent, meaning it will fall under Kasich’s mandate. PACE achieved a 20.9 percent graduation rate during that 2009-10 school year, which nearly doubled since 2007-08 year, when rates sunk to 10.9 percent. Still, every teacher at PACE will face re-licensing. “If this testing is supposed to somehow automatically make our schools better, I don’t get that,” says Steven Hawley, Executive Director at PACE. "I know what it is politically — to look good. They think there must be some reason why these kids can't succeed." Historically, Hawley says, schools with student populations of higher socioeconomic statuses and different demographics rank higher. And he has a point — schools with high performance index rates around Cincinnati include Mariemont City Schools, Indian Hill Exempted Village and Lakota Schools. The Ohio Department of Education's State Report Card system compiles data from every school in a given district to create a district report card. PACE's Performance Index score in in 2010-11 school year was at 40.4. Cincinnati Public Schools earned an 87.3. Hawley insists PACE is full of wonderful kids, but that they're extraordinarily needy. Students come to PACE years behind schedule, he says.  “Gov. Kasich is all about the ‘American dream,’ ” Hawley says. “Most of our kids don’t even know what the American dream is." “There’s very little opportunity for people to have meaningful dialogue to talk about why [schools like PACE] aren’t succeeding. ... I’d invite the governor to live in the inner city. If we’re all going to be measured the same, we’re all going to live the same,” Hawley says.   It’s still unclear whether the state of Ohio would pay for the tests or have districts and charter schools fund the testing, but the Ohio Education Association Teachers’ Union expects the tests to cost around $2.1 million to administer to about 6,000 teachers across the state.
 
 

Feb. 1-7: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 8, 2012
A recent Enquirer story leaves out the fact that the Mormon church outlawed polygamy all the way back in 1890, prohibited black people from priesthood until 1978 and reportedly only overturned it once senior church members found out that the New Orleans Jazz would be moving to Salt Lake City.   

Sept. 9-15: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 16, 2009
Anyone who has ever been caught by their parents stealing stuff from a store knows how much it sucks when they drag you back in there to apologize and give back the Skittles. U.S. Rep. Joe Wilson (R-South Carolina) knows this type of embarrassment, only he doesn’t have a shiny wrapper and eye-level product placement to excuse his actions.  

Seasonal Disorder

Sensory experiences and memories of autumn

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 16, 2009
It all starts with the smell. Every year we blurredly get spun around like we’re playing a game of pin the tail on the donkey and stumble from summer into fall. It’s an emotional time.  

REACHing for More

Program encourages college for low-income and at-risk students

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 19, 2009
As summer draws to a close and families with schoolage children begin preparing for the coming semester, the leaders of Project REACH are gearing up for their second year of work. The program, which provided intensive college-prep guidance in five Cincinnati Public Schools high schools last year, hopes to expand to two more schools for the 2009-10 year.   

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