WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by German Lopez 09.09.2013
Posted In: News, Privacy, 2013 Election, Energy at 09:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
mikedewine

Morning News and Stuff

Facial recognition program insecure, mayoral primary tomorrow, startup innovates cooking

Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office is taking steps to secure Ohio’s facial recognition program against hackers after potential problems were found. The program allows law enforcement and other public officials to use a simple photo to search driver’s license and mugshot databases to get contact information. In the past, officials needed a name or address to search such databases. But the program apparently wasn’t following proper security protocols and lacked typical requirements for passwords, including a mix of upper- and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters, according to The Cincinnati Enquirer. Previously, Gov. John Kasich compared the program’s potential for abuse to breaches of privacy made through federal surveillance programs such as the National Security Agency and Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Tomorrow is the day of the mayoral primary, in which voters will decide between Democrat Roxanne Qualls, Democrat John Cranley, Libertarian Jim Berns and Independent Sandra “Queen” Noble. The two winners will move on to a head-to-head face-off on Nov. 5. Currently, Qualls and Cranley are widely seen as the frontrunners. It’s difficult to predict how many people will turn out to vote, but only 21 percent of Cincinnati voters participated in the mayoral primary in 2005. A Cincinnati entrepreneur is aiming to innovate solar energy through his GoSun solar cooker, which will use solar collectors traditionally seen on solar panels to cook food. Patrick Sherwin launched a Kickstarter campaign for the project on Sept. 5. He says his original interest in solar energy came from a desire to move away from harmful fossil fuels that are warming the planet, and this project gives him a chance to inspire a small cultural shift.Councilman Chris Seelbach will today introduce new legislation that will help crack down on cellphone theft by making it more difficult to sell stolen devices. The initiative will require the hundreds of dealers who currently buy cellphones second-hand to get licensed with the city and keep full records of the transaction, including a serial number of the device, a photocopy of the seller’s ID and other contact information. Seelbach has likened the requirements to existing regulations for pawn shops. The hope is that cracking down on dealers will make stolen cellphones more difficult to sell and less lucrative to potential thieves. Four finalists remain in the search for Cincinnati’s new police chief: acting Chief Paul Humphries; Jeffrey Blackwell, deputy chief of the Columbus, Ohio, Police Department; Michael Dvorak, deputy chief of the Mesa, Ariz., Police Department; and Jerry Speziale, deputy superintendent of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police. Butler County turns away more veterans seeking aid than any county in Ohio. In 2012, veterans asked for help 432 times; they were turned away nearly 40 percent of the time. Although tax receipts are up, they’re coming in below estimate for the first two months of the new fiscal year. The lower-than-expected revenue could cause deficits in the state budget. Ohio gas prices are rising toward the national average. Human babies are apparently hardwired to pay attention to lemurs. If you’re job searching, remember that a job interview can almost always go much worse:
 
 

Worst Week Ever!: July 31-Aug. 6

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 7, 2013
WEDNESDAY JULY 31: People who say that things are “meta” are usually annoying and prone to trying to make themselves appear way more intelligent and informed than they truly are. That said, there seems to be a debate within the debates when it comes to the upcoming Cincinnati mayoral election.    
by Kevin Osborne 03.07.2012
Posted In: 2012 Election, Congress, City Council at 03:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
noble

God Save the Queen

No matter what you think about her, you’ve at least got to admire her spunk.Perennial candidate Sandra “Queen” Noble has suffered another defeat at the polls. Noble ran in the Libertarian Party’s primary Tuesday to be the nominee for Ohio’s 1st Congressional District seat.Noble received just 20 votes (12.74 percent of ballots cast) and lost to Jim Berns, who got 137 votes (87.26 percent).Berns will face off against U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Westwood), the Republican incumbent, in the November election. Others in the race are Democratic candidate Jeff Sinnard and Green Party candidate Rich Stevenson.For comparison, Chabot got 57,005 votes in Tuesday’s primary, while Sinnard got 4,509 and Stevenson got 91.Regular CityBeat readers are familiar with Noble, who ran as an independent last year for Cincinnati City Council. She received 2,726 votes, and finished in 21st place.During that election, Noble responded to CityBeat’s questionnaire to candidates, but her answers didn’t always connect to the queries posed. For example, when she was asked about a garbage fee proposed by City Manager Milton Dohoney Jr., Noble replied, “He's a morpher, over-charging folks for the grand larceny committed by public and staff officials dipping in the till. In '05, I ran for mayor. I offered a guaranteed cure for male-pattern baldness. I'd still do Mr. Dohoney, damn!”Also, she became known for her unusual public appearances and actions on the campaign trail, such as dressing in a makeshift cat tail and cat ears, and drawing whiskers on her face. In a candidate biography, she described herself as a “fashion designer in Walnut Hills who designs tails, which she wears.”At one memorable candidate forum, Noble left the room by walking across the table tops where people were seated in the audience. She also has a personal injury lawsuit against the “Stolen United States of America,” in which she’s seeking “$994 trillion” in damages.Noble, 56, previously ran unsuccessfully for Cincinnati mayor in 2005, receiving 121 votes; and for Congress in Washington, D.C., in 2010, receiving 785 votes.Additionally, she was a candidate for U.S. president in 2004 and 2008, ran for mayor in Las Vegas and Los Angeles, and ran for Los Angeles City Council, according to Project Vote Smart.
 
 

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