WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Mike Breen 03.19.2012
Posted In: Music Video, Music History at 09:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
mlb/wood

This Date in Music History: March 19

Musicians who died too soon and happy birthday to Terry Hall of The Specials

This date in music history is a sad one, marking the "gone too soon" deaths of several young musicians with a lot ahead of them. • Guitarist Paul Kossoff was the cofounder of British Rock band Free with singer Paul Rodgers and bassist Andy Fraser. The band's 1970 Fire and Water album spawned the band's best-known song, "All Right Now," but the band split by the end of that year. They reformed in 1972 and put out two more albums before calling it quits for good. Kossoff did solo work, played with many other artists and formed a band called Back Street Crawler. The guitarist was in poor health in the years after Free, reportedly due to drug problems and frustration over the demise of his most successful musical project. Kossoff died on a flight from L.A. to New York in 1976 from heart problems. His father spent the rest of his life campaigning against the perils of drug abuse, even doing a touring one-man show about his son. Kossoff's headstone contains the epitaph, "All Right Now."Kossoff was 25. • Thirty years ago today, guitar great Randy Rhoads, who played with Quiet Riot but became legendary for his work with Ozzy Osbourne, died. The day after a concert with Ozzy in Knoxville, the Classical-influenced six-stringer and the rest of the band stopped at an airstrip for some "joyriding." Rhoads was afraid of flying, but hopped on a small plane because he was told they'd do nothing risky (stylist Rachel Youngblood had a heart condition, so the pilot promised to take it easy) and Rhoads wanted to take some photos from the air. The plane buzzed the band tour bus twice, but on its third attempt, one of the wings was clipped by the the bus and the pilot lost control. The plane went through a tree, crashed into a garage and burst into flames. The pilot, Youngblood and Rhoads all died, their bodies burned beyond recognition.  Rhoads was 25. Here's Ozzy, years later, listening to Rhoads' alleged last recorded guitar solo for the first time in pure awe. • When the "Proto Grunge" band Green River broke up in 1988, the band split into two new groups. Mark Arm and Steve Turner formed the influential Mudhoney, while Bruce Fairweather, Jeff Ament and Stone Gossard formed the glammy Rock band Mother Love Bone with young, enigmatic singer Andrew Wood. MLB signed with PolyGram and released an EP. Then, just days before its debut album was to be released, Wood was found passed out by his girlfriend. He had overdosed on heroin. Placed on life support, Wood died three days after being admitted to the hospital, on this date in 1990. (Ament and Gossard would solider on, finding a new singer — Eddie Vedder — and forming Pearl Jam.)Wood was 24. • Drummer Jeff Ward was a successful drummer from the Ministry camp, meaning he worked with bands like Revolting Cocks, Lard and, of course, Ministry. Ward also spent time playing drums with Nine Inch Nails. The drummer (who also worked with a band called Low Pop Suicide) committed suicide on this date in 1993 by locking himself in his garage with the car running. Ward was 30. Here's a track from another Ministry side project, 1000 Homo DJs, featuring Ward on "cop vocals."Click on for Born This Day featuring Bun B, Billy Sheehan, Ricky Wilson and Terry Hall:

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by Mike Breen 02.21.2012
Posted In: Music Video, Music Commentary at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
nina

This Date in Music History: Feb. 21

Happy birthday to the Gibson Flying V guitar and the incomparable Nina Simone

On this day in 1958, the very first "Flying V" guitar shipped from the Gibson factory in Kalamazoo, Mich. The guitar's distinct body — shaped, as the name suggest, like a "V," and made almost to look like it had aerodynamic qualities  — was initially the instrument's downfall. In its first two years available, the pointy axe was a flop; according to Gibson's website and author Larry Meiners' book Flying "V": The Illustrated History of This Modernistic Guitar, fewer that 100 total Flying Vs were ordered in ’58 and ’59.But the odd design was also a draw for at least some musicians. For Blues players Albert King and Lonnie Mack (who, according to Gibson, is said to have purchased his first at Glenn Hughes Music in Cincinnati), the unique aesthetic of the guitar became a part of their image. In the ’60s, the aesthetic suddenly seemed less flashy to Rock guitar gods like Jimi Hendrix, and demand caused Gibson to begin producing the instrument once again in 1967 (Jimi had one immediately). In the ’70s, the guitar's appeal was enough to keep it in production, as everyone from Marc Bolan (T Rex) to Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top) began to sling one. By the ’80s, the Flying V became most identifiable with Metal, used prominently by Ozzy sidekick Randy Rhoads, dweedle-dweedle master Yngwie Malmsteen and players from Judas Priest, Metallica, Megadeth, Scorpions and a bazillion others.Alternative and Modern Rock players also took to the the V  — Bob Mould of Husker Du used his V quite a lot, while the guys in Weezer were perhaps the first to use them "ironically." The instrument's endurance is mostly due to the Flying V's appearance, making it more of a fashion accessory than a guitar specifically picked for its sound (though it was lighter than the usual guitar, at least initially).Here are two clips showing the V in action, the first featuring Lonnie Mack and the second a music video by Jay Reatard, the late cult hero from Memphis. Click the jump for "Born This Day" featuring video of Nina Simone's first time on national television, playing The Ed Sullivan Show in 1960.

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