WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Kelsey Kennedy 02.17.2014 66 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 01:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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'Downton Abbey' Season Four, Episode Seven

Bringing the latest in uppity British television

Upstairs: Upstairs is busy with rigidity and drama this week, and it’s about what it’s always about: bribery and corruption. The big pig debacle is teaching all of the upstairs cast about life and hard work. Mr. Blake and Mr. Gillingham are in the same room with Mary, and things get heated. Mr. Blake finally exits, but not without leaving a trail of sexual tension behind him. Nobody knows how Robert is “getting on” in America because he is slowly becoming an insignificant character on the show and in the family. Mr. Blake handles Mary’s child (what’s his name/he’s never around) and Mary is obviously super turned on by that, as told by the widening of her eyes. Edith and Mary have been rather nice to each other lately, but oh how I miss the rotten cattiness. Isobel Crawley is encouraging Branson to find socialism again, but he finds Sarah Bunting instead. Bunting, the political teacher with a pretty smile, seems to be a fitting replacement for Sybil. Maybe. As always, I am still grieving over Sybil and Matthew, and it might still be too soon for me. Too. Soon. Aunt Rosamund, who is usually an ice cold bitch, is keeping Edith’s secret baby a secret. Which is really, really hard for her. Still no word from Michael Gregson, and the Dowager Countess finds out about the secret baby because that woman doesn’t miss a beat. Rosamund reassures Edith with, “You are not happy, but at least free”. Cousin Rose is caught with Jack Ross in public again, and Branson’s feathers seem ruffled. Remember when Matthew used to swoop in and rescue Rose (and the entire family) from insufferable embarrassment? This time, however, Rose is not just partying and making a fool of herself. She seems to truly enjoy Ross’s company (or at least the thrill of it). When Ross seems weary of the situation, she comforts him by saying, “Isn’t it time people knew there are bigger and better values than the mean spirited ones they live by?” Later, when she finally reveals she is ENGAGED, it seems she only wants to get married to a black guy to piss her mother off. Downstairs: Is anyone else getting sick of how bitter Daisy has been over Alfred? Now Alfred wants to marry Ivy, and Mrs. Patmore is tweakin’ about handling this much drama. Ivy is in the exact same situation as Daisy was with William in seasons one & two. Minus World War I and awkward family guilt trips. Mrs. Patmore has become somewhat of a guidance counselor and authority figure for the younger staff, and it’s an enjoyable dynamic. She may pretend to hate it, but on the inside she loves being that maternal figure in Daisy and Ivy’s life. After Daisy says goodbye to Alfred, Mrs. Patmore expresses her pride: “If you were my own daughter, I couldn’t be prouder than I am now.” Anna finally confesses to Mary that Lord Gillingham’s valet Mr. Green, was her rapist. Lord Mary’s realization gave me chills, mainly because I’m not used to seeing that much of a reaction from her. After some sleuthing, Mr. Bates totally knows Mr. Green was the one who raped his wife, and he plans to do something about it. Mary Convinced Mr. Gillingham to relieve Mr. Green from his duties, but HE’S DEAD AND BATES PROBABLY KILLED HIM. Mr. Molesley and Miss Baxter share a tender moment about feeling “fragile” and their loyalties to Thomas, the mischievous under butler. Until next week, “Life kicks the stuffing outta ya sometimes, doesn’t it?" – Molesley
 
 
by Jac Kern 05.28.2013
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 09:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
colonel

'Antiques Roadshow' Offers Behind-the-Scenes Look at Cincinnati Episode

Episode to air on CET June 3

CET will premiere behind-the-scenes footage from Antiques Roadshow’s Cincinnati episode (taped at Duke Energy Convention Center on July 21, 2012 and aired April 1-15, 2013) at 8 p.m. Monday, June 3. When it was announced in February 2012 that Antiques Roadshow would return to Cincinnati to tape another episode of the PBS show locally, the response was resounding. More than 37,000 people across the country registered for free tickets to the live taping July 21, 2012. Attendees are chosen at random. The PBS appraisal show, a favorite among old people and stoners who refuse to pay for cable, travels to different cities with a team of staffers, appraisers and volunteers to meet with the thousands of locals and visitors who believe their junk, inheritances, yard sale finds and other antiques are worth a pretty penny — and some who just want to be on TV. The recent Cincinnati episodes featured Rookwood pottery, Colonel Sanders’ suit, an 1846 map of the western United States and much more. This behind-the-scenes episode will show more of how an event of this magnitude is run so smoothly, but maybe you’ll also get a peek of your neighbor getting his creepy doll collection appraised! Tune into CET at 8 p.m. Monday to watch.
 
 
by Jac Kern 07.19.2012
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 10:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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'Antiques Roadshow' Filming in Cincinnati

PBS Series shooting around town this week; appraisal event Saturday

Popular PBS series and appraisal show pioneer Antiques Roadshow has come to Cincinnati to film an episode locally. Film crews can be seen at various area landmarks such as Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, the American Sign Museum and the appraisal site, Duke Energy Convention Center.Host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Lark Manson were scheduled to visit the zoo today to discuss the rhino population crisis and its relation to antique trading. The crew will stop by the American Sign Museum Friday with Walberg and appraiser Leila Dunbar to cover 20th century vintage signage and get some vibrant shots of the local attraction.Saturday is the big day for the lucky 6,000 expected guests in attendance. From 8 a.m.-5 p.m., more than 70 appraisers will be on-site at the Duke Energy Center to assess the value of more than 12,000 vintage toys, antique furniture, knick-knacks and plenty of other items. Of all stops on Antiques Roadshow's six-city tour, Cincinnati's show received that highest number of ticket requests (more than 37,000). Antiques Roadshow attendees are selected at random prior to the event.The episode is set to air on PBS in 2013. The show previously filmed an episode in Cincinnati in 1998. Watch July 21st, 2012 -- ROADSHOW Comes to Cincinnati, OH! on PBS. See more from Antiques Roadshow.
 
 

Beasties, City Limits and Radiohead

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 5, 2011
It’s hard to be an aging Hip Hop artist. You can retain your dignity and status only so long before some young whippersnapper MC conjures up the most destructive dis of all: “You’re old.” So kudos to Ad-Rock of The Beastie Boys for somehow managing to not completely embarrass himself or his bandmates during a recent appearance on Quilting Arts TV … er, rather Top Chef: Just Desserts.  

Middletown (Review)

Icarus Films, 1982, Not Rated

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 9, 2011
Middletown, a 1982 PBS documentary series about everyday life in Middle America has had a troubled history. Produced by Peter Davis, it was meant as a return to the searing, revelatory, verite-style reality television that PBS pioneered with 1973’s An American Family.  

Austin City Limits, Iggy Pop and Ozzy

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 6, 2009
The best music show on TV, PBS's "Austin City Limits," has announced the lineup of artists for its 35th anniversary season, which starts Oct. 3. The roster is another great mix of established artists and relative newcomers and includes Cincinnati's own Heartless Bastards, who have relocated to Austin.  

Appalachia: A History of Mountains and People (Review)

PBS series looks at the region's history and mystery

1 Comment · Wednesday, April 8, 2009
Appalachia is a mystery in the heart of America. But a new four-hour PBS series tries to provide some answers, showing Appalachians as having been badly exploited, even dehumanized, by our capitalist economy. The rich industrialists who bought up the resources saw the "workers, like the land, (as) simply tools for profit." Grade: C.   

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