WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

The Oxygen of Publicity

0 Comments · Friday, September 19, 2014
A photo of children being buried after an attack in Ukraine led the Sept. 9 New York Times. I looked at it repeatedly, turning away, then returning. No gore. No bloody bandages. No hovering physicians. A few grieving relatives and neighbors.  

Larry Flynt Was Right

0 Comments · Thursday, September 4, 2014
Buried in old files from decades of teaching reporting and journalism ethics is a flyer mailed to local homes by pornographer Larry Flynt.   

George Clooney vs. the Tabloids

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 29, 2014
Here’s a twist on the old “Don’t pick a fight with someone who buys ink by the gallon.” That was when print ruled. Now, it’s don’t pick an online fight with an immensely popular actor and a respected lawyer who come from journalism families: George Clooney and fiance Amal Alamuddin.   

Who Guards the Guardians?

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Barack Obama’s Justice Department remains at war with reporters, invoking national security so often we should check to see if the sky is falling.   

Government Must Not Define Who Is a Journalist

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 11, 2014
Developments at the U.S. Supreme Court and Colorado legislature demonstrate how government restricts our access to news.   

Reporters and Ill-Advised Security Reporting Tactics

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 28, 2014
There’s something about a WET PAINT sign that overwhelms good sense and manners. We have to test it.    

Article Highlights Cost-Effective Charities

1 Comment · Wednesday, February 22, 2012
Years ago, after speaking at a local Catholic high school on the students’ duty to give intelligently when they donate to charity, a student grabbed my arm en route to lunch of grilled cheese s  

Photographing Police is a Dangerous Business

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 23, 2011
Are increasingly militarized local police — helmets, assault rifles, black uniforms and boots, etc. — using excessive force more often than previous generations? Or has technology — cell phones and YouTube — made any use of force, whether excessive or justified, easier to document?  

Criminalizing Photography Is Worrisome

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 14, 2011
Until the other day, I thought Cincinnati police officers were too bright to confiscate cameras in a public place at a public meeting to which the public was invited. Hell, the owners of the cameras weren’t disrupting the meeting or photographing coppers using excessive force. But I was wrong. One of Cincinnati’s finest took two voters’ cameras on orders from U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Westwood) or people working for Chabot. It was a town meeting and Chabot was the speaker.  

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