What should I be doing instead of this?
 
 

Event: Northside Art in the Park

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 4, 2016
Northside Art in the Park brings together more than 50 area artists to sell their handmade and hand-crafted products while you enjoy family-friendly activities and bites from some of the city’s best food trucks.   
by Katherine Newman 03.23.2016 61 days ago
Posted In: Arts community, Culture at 11:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
12370724_10153402893926443_4080419450865252684_o

Nonprofit Spotlight: Visionaries + Voices

Visionaries + Voices is a nonprofit organization operating in Northside. The purpose of V+V is to provide space and opportunity for artists with disabilities to thrive, giving exhibition opportunities, studio space, supplies and support to more than 125 artists with disabilities. “Our mission is to provide artists with professional, creative, and cultural opportunities,” says Hannah Leow, volunteer coordinator at V+V. The artists were creating before they come to V+V so they just keep doing their own thing. “They keep their vision and their style, we just support them,” Leow says. Visionaries + Voices achieves its mission in three ways, the first being the studio program where artists can come and spend time working on their art. The exhibition program gives opportunities for them to show their work with five exhibits a year in the Northside gallery. The final piece is the Teaching Artist Program, which allows artists to go into the community and teach their style of creativity. Volunteer: Volunteers are needed Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and occasionally on evenings and weekends. The biggest need is for people in the creative field who are interested in making art and want to work collaboratively with artists. “The biggest need I’ve seen is creative folks, or folks who aren't creative and are interested in learning about creativity, being in the studio working with the artists,” Leow says. Service learning days at V+V are great for high school groups. They can come in and do organizational tasks for a little while, which is very helpful to the organization. Then they have the chance to work with the artists and combine their creative ideas.Opportunities outside of creative work include organizational projects, cleaning and providing technical support. There are volunteers at V+V who come frequently and have been there for a long time, but there are also volunteers who don't come so often. There really isn’t a requirement for the type of commitment you need to make. Anyone interested in volunteering can reach out online. Before starting as a volunteer, expect a short introductory session with a tour of the studio and general information about the organization and its goals, a questionnaire and background check. “It’s a pretty quick process,” Leow says. Some of the resources available to volunteers include articles about working with adults with disabilities. This isn’t really focused on during the brief training because Leow believes it’s something you learn as you go. “The biggest thing for me is that it’s an experience based training,” Leow says. There is no real precursor to being a good fit at V+V. Decisions are made on a case-by-case basis “We feel it out with each person,” Leow says. It is about connecting and accepting the artist. They have a wide variety of volunteers from many different creative backgrounds. Donations: Art supplies are in high demand at V+V. You can find a list online detailing what is needed. Some of the items include permanent markers, ink pads, buttons, sewing needles and glitter. One unique program promotes giving the gift of stocks. Consider donating stocks that have already been acquired and increased in value. Financial advisors are able to transfer stocks from private parties to Visionaries + Voices. In return, the organization will issue an acknowledgement of the gift. For more information on VISIONARIES + VOICES visit visionariesandvoices.com.
 
 
by Cassie Lipp 02.24.2016 89 days ago
Posted In: COMMUNITY, Culture at 04:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
building_value_logo

Slice of Cincinnati: Building Value

Customers entering Building Value in Northside are greeted by a yard of bathtubs, sinks and other home furnishings. It might seem like a graveyard for building materials, but these old home fixtures are awaiting a new life. This is confirmed by the set of child-sized lawn chairs by the store entrance. Upon closer inspection it’s clear that the chairs are actually repurposed shopping carts. Inside, customers bustle around the store through aisles of cabinets, shelves and other furniture looking for a new home. All of the goods available for purchase at Building Value are either donated by homeowners who no longer use them or salvaged from demolished homes. Anything bought here can be given a new life in another home rather than sitting in a landfill. While two men get out a tape measure to see if their dream cabinets will fit inside their kitchen, the store cat Bella Value perches atop the checkout counter as the clerk asks a customer to sign a donation form. “With or without the cat’s help?” he asks. Bella seems indifferent to the man’s signature as he signs off on the goods he donated to the store.“Bella doesn’t actually itemize or give customers value for their stuff,” store manager David Daniels says. “She is on payroll to take care of the mice.” Building Value’s main mission is to employ people with disabilities and other workplace difficulties and give them the training needed to obtain positions in the construction field that pay livable wages. Those who complete Building Value’s training program develop basic deconstruction skills. They may then be hired by companies like Messer Construction, a partner of Building Value. “A combination of our program and our store work hand in hand,” Daniels says. “The deconstruction part tears down buildings and brings it back to the store; the store sells it so that we can make money to fund our mission.” Instead of completely knocking a house to the ground, Building Value works to take it apart piece by piece so that almost all parts are salvageable and able to be resold in the store. All proceeds benefit programs at Easter Seals, a nonprofit dedicated to creating opportunities for those with disabilities or disadvantages to realize their full potential. The tristate chapter of Easter seals founded the store in 2004. “We’re trying to carefully remove items so that it can come here and get a second life as the same thing or maybe repurposed,” Daniels says. “Our biggest component here is how much stuff we divert from the landfill.” The cheapest way to demolish a building is to completely raze it and dump all of the components into a landfill, Daniels says. Although Building Value does not demolish homes this way, having the service done by them may be comparable or cheaper because the items salvaged for resale are tax-deductible donations. “The thing that separates us from another business is that all the material that comes back to the store is an actual tax write-off to the organization that offsets their bill,” Daniels says. Daniels says Building Value will take the bricks, wood floors, windows, staircases, mantles and nearly any other part of a house. Customers could almost build a house from the store’s materials. While this provides a low-cost alternative for customers, it is also ideal for those who own older homes who may not be able to find the parts they need at stores like Home Depot or Lowe’s. Building Value’s inventory is more eclectic because it is sourced from donations and changes every week. The customers who shop at Building Value are contractors, house flippers and those looking to repurpose old items — a group Daniels proudly calls “the Pinterest crowd.” Since the key to making money off these ventures is finding cheap materials, Building Value is an essential shopping destination for these customers. Before Daniels became the store manager, he flipped old houses and was a frequent customer himself. He combines his skills from managing a Walgreens store with his knowledge of what homebuilders need to run Building Value. “[At Walgreens] I was working a lot of hours, but I was never inspired,” he says. “This job inspires me — I come in on my day off every week.” Daniels says rather than working hard to help Walgreens profit, he is now working hard for a better cause. ”This store is a win-win situation,” he says. “The customers win, the company wins, the environment wins. Nobody is getting a bad shake out of this.” For more information on BUILDING VALUE, visit buildingvalue.org.
 
 
by Cassie Lipp 02.18.2016 95 days ago
Posted In: Bar at 02:14 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
courtesy of urban artifact

Slice of Cincinnati: Urban Artifact

With sour beers and live music with state-of-the-art audio quality, Urban Artifact brings people together for “wild culture” — its tagline — all housed within a historic Northside church.The craft brewery, which opened in April 2015, offers house-brewed sour beers, including seasonal flavors, as well as five signature staples. Liquor and wine are also offered for those who do not care for sours. If you visit Urban Artifact this month, be sure to try their Abacus gose, which pairs the flavors of raspberry and chocolate for a surprisingly smooth treat. (I am not much of a beer drinker myself, but Abacus is the only beer I have ever liked.) One of Urban Artifact’s four owners, Scott Hand, boasts that it is probably the only beer of its kind in the world. “We like to combine the activity of getting together with great beer,” Hand says. Urban Artifact beer is complemented with live music nearly every night of the week. With a different band playing each night, Urban Artifact’s crowd also changes nightly. The venue invites all different types of artists to play there, but the strongest emphasis is on local and regional acts. The brewery’s taproom and listening lounge are located in the old church basement, unique for its high quality acoustics. Artists who play there are left remarking on how great the sound is. This excellent sound comes thanks to Hand, who used his expertise in designing theater spaces to craft the music venue. Urban Artifact plans to move into the sanctuary part of the church after renovations are complete. Converting this space into the ideal music venue will be the most difficult part of the process, but Hand says he is ready and excited for the challenge. He is currently in the planning phase for this project. The idea for Urban Artifact sprung from Hand’s interest in music. In fact, he started an independent music label while in college at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Art, Architecture and Planning. His label, Grayscale Records, was meant to represent all music in the indie spectrum. After writing a plan about the future of the music business, Hand decided to focus on connecting an audience directly to musicians instead. Beer was added to the mix in order to create the Urban Artifact brand. While Hand moved to Chicago after graduating from UC, he returned to Cincinnati almost five years ago for his family. Here, he met the right business partners to bring his vision to life. He remarks on how Cincinnati is the ideal city for a project to sprout. “You can do everything here,” he says. “You can come here with a dream and good business plan and make it happen.” Urban Artifact’s location within the city is also ideal. The old church was chosen because it was in the middle of a neighborhood, which Hand says has been fantastically receptive to the new venue. “While I would love to be a tourist attraction, it’s great to be appreciated by the locals,” he says. At first, Hand was apprehensive about housing Urban Artifact in an old church. “I thought the church thing was going to be a deal breaker, but almost everyone who comes here thinks it’s hilarious,” he says. This includes a group of 18 priests who came into Urban Artifact dressed in their full traditional garbs to drink one day. Check artifactbeer.com for complete music listings. Visitors can also look forward to URBAN ARTIFACT’s one year anniversary party April 23 and special events housed above the bar and music space. Drinkers in Dayton and Columbus can find Urban Artifact beers at select distributors throughout the area.
 
 

Tickle Pickle (Review)

Northside’s Tickle Pickle walk-up window serves Rock-themed burgers and shakes

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Back-alley, Earth-conscious, locally sourced Rock & Roll burgers are exactly the kind of thing one would expect to find in Northside. When driving down Hamilton Avenue on a recent Tuesday afternoon, I decided to try Tickle Pickle, which happens to serve just that.   

Fighting Fear

Activists in Northside take to the streets to protest increasing violence against women

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 14, 2015
In the early morning hours of Oct. 2, two teenagers approached a woman near the corner of Chase and Virginia avenues in Northside and assaulted her. The terrifying incident wasn’t an isolated occurrence in Northside, which has seen a spike in reports of of violent rapes and sexual assaults.  

Staying in Character

Northside community members tap help from the feds hoping to keep the neighborhood affordable and accessible

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 16, 2015
On a sunny day in late August, a group from the Northside Community Council gave four representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency, in from Washington, D.C. and the federal agency’s Region 5 office in Chicago, a winding tour of the neighborhood.   

Nerds in Northside

Arcade Legacy: Bar Edition serves up vintage arcade games, alcohol and gourmet hot dogs

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Northside’s got itself a new arcade-bar. Arcade Legacy: Bar Edition is home to an expertly curated selection of retro video games, beers, cocktails and gourmet hot dogs.   

Arcade Etiquette

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 16, 2015
So you’re at a arcade-bar for the first time and you’re overwhelmed by the hordes of drunken youth, flashy lights and Space Invaders sound effects.  

Event: McMicken FreeSpace Grand Opening

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 2, 2015
A first-of-its-kind community infoshop for books, zines and events opened two years ago in Northside. It’s now reopening at a new location in Brighton Saturday and expanding its breadth of public services.  

0|1
 
Close
Close
Close