WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Mike Breen 05.17.2012
Posted In: Music Video, Music History at 09:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
dylan

This Date in Music History: May 17

Bob Dylan deemed "Judas!" and NIN's Trent Reznor's Synth Pop origins

Today is the 46th anniversary of one of the most memorable "heckles" in entertainment history. And the response was pretty classic, too.In July of 1965, Bob Dylan shocked the audience at the Newport Folk Festival (where he was virtually a god after performing the previous two years) by performing "electric" and with his full band. Those who wanted to hear solo, acoustic Dylan booed as the group launched into "Maggie's Farm," though some in the audience cheered the bold move. He finished the set with a solo, acoustic encore. Lore has it that the boos were from those upset Dylan was playing electric, though his organist Al Kooper said it was because the sound sucked. Still, Dylan would deal with such polarized reactions for the next year or so as he continued to rock electrically (the sound couldn't have been bad everywhere, right?) for part of his sets. On May 17, 1966, Dylan played the Free Trade Hall in Manchester, England. As documented on bootlegs, film and the official release, The Bootleg Series Vol. 4: Bob Dylan Live 1966, The "Royal Albert Hall" Concert, which came out in 1998 (the "Royal Albert Hall" referring to the common misconception that the notorious show was in London), one disapproving fan shouted "Judas!" Dylan responded to the reference to the New Testament tale of Jesus betrayer Judas Iscariot by saying, "I don't believe you, you're a liar." The strange yet perfect response may have been a come-back to the "Judas" yelp, but some believe he was responding to another less audible heckle: "I'm never listening to you again, ever!" Which makes more sense. Sorta.The young man who shouted the heckle broke his silence after three decades and did a few interviews, calling the moment "embarrassing" for himself. The man, Keith Butler, was also interviewed right after the concert, footage of which popped up in the Eat the Document documentary. The then 21-year-old told an interviewer, "Any pop group could produce better rubbish than that! It was a bloody disgrace! He's a traitor!" Video of the "Judas" moment was discovered and featured in the biographical documentary film, No Direction Home. Go to the 56-second mark of the clip to hear it.Born This Day: Musical movers and shakers sharing a May 17 birthday include original bass singer for The Spinners, Pervis Jackson (1938); eclectic Blues legend Taj Mahal (1942); drummer for Prog heroes King Crimson and Yes, Bill Bruford (1949); Irish New Age goddess Enya (1961); keyboardist/songwriter for Phish, Page McConnell (1963); hunky New Kids of the Block star Jordan Knight (1970); former Stoner Rock pioneer with Kyuss turned Hard Rock star with Queens of the Stone Age, Josh Homme (1973); original vocalist for Florida Metalcore band Underoath and current frontman for "Southern Metal" crew Maylene and the Sons of Disaster, Dallas Taylor (1980); and Nine Inch Nails founder Trent Reznor (1965).Reznor — an Ohio native — was awarded the ASCAP Golden Note Award last month for his work in music over the past 25 years. Presumably not including his time with the early ’80s Cleveland Synth Pop acts Exotic Birds (which opened for Culture Club!) and Slam Bamboo, which sounds nearly identical to Howard Jones. Pretty fun stuff, actually. The haircuts … not so much.
 
 

The Unknown and the Unknowable

1 Comment · Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Because it is my lot in life as a writer — however anonymous — to speak of things that are entertaining and/or truthful, I find myself often torn. Especially now that I am post-40, going on 60. But I’m an open book, if nothing else. The only remaining question is whether said book’s ending is good or bad.   
by Mike Breen 03.19.2012
Posted In: Music Video, Music History at 09:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
mlb/wood

This Date in Music History: March 19

Musicians who died too soon and happy birthday to Terry Hall of The Specials

This date in music history is a sad one, marking the "gone too soon" deaths of several young musicians with a lot ahead of them. • Guitarist Paul Kossoff was the cofounder of British Rock band Free with singer Paul Rodgers and bassist Andy Fraser. The band's 1970 Fire and Water album spawned the band's best-known song, "All Right Now," but the band split by the end of that year. They reformed in 1972 and put out two more albums before calling it quits for good. Kossoff did solo work, played with many other artists and formed a band called Back Street Crawler. The guitarist was in poor health in the years after Free, reportedly due to drug problems and frustration over the demise of his most successful musical project. Kossoff died on a flight from L.A. to New York in 1976 from heart problems. His father spent the rest of his life campaigning against the perils of drug abuse, even doing a touring one-man show about his son. Kossoff's headstone contains the epitaph, "All Right Now."Kossoff was 25. • Thirty years ago today, guitar great Randy Rhoads, who played with Quiet Riot but became legendary for his work with Ozzy Osbourne, died. The day after a concert with Ozzy in Knoxville, the Classical-influenced six-stringer and the rest of the band stopped at an airstrip for some "joyriding." Rhoads was afraid of flying, but hopped on a small plane because he was told they'd do nothing risky (stylist Rachel Youngblood had a heart condition, so the pilot promised to take it easy) and Rhoads wanted to take some photos from the air. The plane buzzed the band tour bus twice, but on its third attempt, one of the wings was clipped by the the bus and the pilot lost control. The plane went through a tree, crashed into a garage and burst into flames. The pilot, Youngblood and Rhoads all died, their bodies burned beyond recognition.  Rhoads was 25. Here's Ozzy, years later, listening to Rhoads' alleged last recorded guitar solo for the first time in pure awe. • When the "Proto Grunge" band Green River broke up in 1988, the band split into two new groups. Mark Arm and Steve Turner formed the influential Mudhoney, while Bruce Fairweather, Jeff Ament and Stone Gossard formed the glammy Rock band Mother Love Bone with young, enigmatic singer Andrew Wood. MLB signed with PolyGram and released an EP. Then, just days before its debut album was to be released, Wood was found passed out by his girlfriend. He had overdosed on heroin. Placed on life support, Wood died three days after being admitted to the hospital, on this date in 1990. (Ament and Gossard would solider on, finding a new singer — Eddie Vedder — and forming Pearl Jam.)Wood was 24. • Drummer Jeff Ward was a successful drummer from the Ministry camp, meaning he worked with bands like Revolting Cocks, Lard and, of course, Ministry. Ward also spent time playing drums with Nine Inch Nails. The drummer (who also worked with a band called Low Pop Suicide) committed suicide on this date in 1993 by locking himself in his garage with the car running. Ward was 30. Here's a track from another Ministry side project, 1000 Homo DJs, featuring Ward on "cop vocals."Click on for Born This Day featuring Bun B, Billy Sheehan, Ricky Wilson and Terry Hall:

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