WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Andy Brownfield 08.31.2012
 
 
city hall

City Council Cancels First Half of September Meetings

DNC causes first week's cancellations, Council to resume Sept. 19

After taking a two-month summer break — with a week for some committee hearings and a council meeting — Cincinnati City Council has canceled its meetings for the first half of September. The council meetings for Sept. 6 and 12 have been canceled, along with all committee meetings for the first week of September and the Job Growth Committee meeting for Sept. 10. Jason Barron, spokesman for Mayor Mark Mallory, said the council meetings were canceled due to the Democratic National Convention, which is occurring in the first week of September. Barron said many of the Democratic officials in the city are delegates to the convention. Asked why the City Council meeting was canceled for the second week of September, Barron said he didn’t know.Council did meet once in August, where they approved a ballot measure to lengthen council terms from two to four years, as well as a plan to undo the sale of the Blue Ash airport. All of the committee meetings for the week of the DNC were canceled as well. Strategic Growth Committee chairwoman Laure Quinlivan is not a delegate to the convention, but is attending, an aide said. Council members Roxanne Qualls and Cecil Thomas, who chair the Budget and Finance and Public Safety Committees respectively, did not respond to CityBeat’s requests for comment as of Friday afternoon. A special meeting of the Rules and Government Operations Committee is meeting on Sept. 10 — the first committee meeting after the summer break. An aide to committee chairman Wendell Young says the committee is meeting to receive a report from a task force charged with recommending ways to put grocery stores in so-called “food deserts” — neighborhoods where fresh food isn’t readily available. The Livable Communities Committee and Major Transportation & Infrastructure Sub-committee are meeting during the second week of September, but the first full council meeting isn’t until the 19th. Council still has a few big-ticket items it is expected to deal with this year, including proposed budget cuts from City Manager Milton Dohoney (expected to be laid out in November) and the approval of a new city plan, which shifts development emphasis from downtown and Over-the-Rhine to the city’s other 50 neighborhoods. More on that plan here. 
 
 

Clean Exchange

Local advocates have a needle exchange program ready to treat a recognized epidemic. Will authorities give it their blessing?

1 Comment · Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Two local advocates are in the process of securing private funding to operate a syringe exchange program called the Cincinnati Exchange Project. But even though the program is approved, it still faces one major stumbling block — Ohio’s laws regarding drug paraphernalia possession.  

City Officials Protect Tillery’s Sweetheart Deal

2 Comments · Wednesday, June 8, 2011
People who closely follow the budget troubles plaguing City Hall for the past couple of years know that Cincinnati City Council had to make numerous cuts to services last winter to avoid a $54.7 million deficit. Those cuts originally included eliminating residential yard waste collection, ending funding for nurses in public schools and keeping most of the city-owned swimming pools closed this summer.  

Cincy’s Streetcar Is the Little Engine That Could

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 11, 2011
If Ohio’s execrable new governor thought he was going to stop Cincinnati’s long-planned streetcar project by blocking $51.8 million in state funding for the project, he’d better think again. Led by Mayor Mark Mallory and City Manager Milton Dohoney Jr., city officials last week unveiled a new, shorter Phase One for the proposed system. The revised project now will be comprised of a four-mile initial segment from downtown’s Fountain Square to Findlay Market in Over-the-Rhine, at a cost of $95 million.  

Peeking Inside the Department of 'Corections'

0 Comments · Monday, October 11, 2010
My favorite reading includes corrections. Everyone errs. Some admit it and correct their errors. Graphs, maps and percentages figure prominently in corrections, but names of people and places most often seem to trip us up. Get a name wrong, and it becomes journalism history if not local legend. Unless it's corrected, others reporters may rely on that spelling and get into all kinds of trouble.   

Police Chief Mulls Officer's Fate Amid Squabbling

1 Comment · Wednesday, March 31, 2010
After a seven-month internal investigation, the Cincinnati Police Department finally released its findings last week from a probe into whether Lt. Col. Michael Cureton, an assistant police chief, improperly offered a free police escort for R&B singer Jamie Foxx in exchange for 40 concert tickets.   

Peeking into the Minds of Local Conservatives

1 Comment · Wednesday, March 10, 2010
CityBeat recently obtained a copy of an e-mail written by Brad Beckett — chief of staff to Cincinnati City Councilman Chris Monzel and a right-wing activist involved in anti-tax and anti-abortion causes — outlining the agenda of a secret conservative group called the Vanguard. We were fascinated by the wording the e-mail used about prominent public figures and what it might reveal about the members' outlook for the 2010 elections.  

Jan. 6-12: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 13, 2010
We at WWE! realize that in 17 years things will be a lot different — technology will be increasingly difficult to use and people who are 10 right now will be able to kick our asses. Another thing that’s going to suck is that the $1.9 billion Cincinnati Retirement System is going to be broke unless fundamental changes are made soon.  

Politicians Scurrying To and Fro

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 23, 2009
President Obama and his supremely obnoxious chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, should be more honest. The $871 billion health care reform bill passed by the U.S. Senate Dec. 21 after eight long and tedious months of debate is, by all indications, almost the exact bill that both men had in mind when they began this process. It's clear that so far this isn't the president most of us signed up for.  

Conservative Policies and Progressive Voices

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 2, 2009
As Mayor Mark Mallory and the new City Council are sworn in this week, the city says goodbye to two of its trusted progressive allies, David Crowley and Greg Harris. With the return of hard right-winger Charlie Winburn, council's conservative coalition now owns a 5-4 vote margin. It's now time for them to step up and offer a more inspiring plan than their current "No."  

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