WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

The Church with The Sharp Things

Sunday • Woodward Theater

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 3, 2015
In the late ’70s, Australia exported a fair amount of bracingly unique Alternative Rock that rivaled anything produced by America or Great Britain.  

Justin Townes Earle with Gill Landry

Tuesday • Southgate House Revival

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 3, 2015
When you are Justin Townes Earle and you are the son of the famous musician Steve Earle, the bonus of name recognition soon gives way to overt scrutiny.   

The Life and Times with Ashes and Iron

Thursday • MOTR Pub

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 3, 2015
Indie Rock power trios are as common as crime, but the ones that rise to the top of the form defy the limitations of their numbers by sounding more expansive than the standard guitar/bass/drums set-up.   

Iris DeMent with Pieta Brown

Thursday • 20th Century Theater

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 3, 2015
In the Folk/Gospel/Country realm, few singer/songwriters are as acclaimed, respected and beloved as Iris DeMent by devoted fans as well as her adoring peer group.  
by Jac Kern 02.06.2015 26 days ago
Posted In: Music, TV/Celebrity at 12:29 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Lamb Watch 2015

Weekly 'American Idol' recap featuring Cincinnati's Jess Lamb

With the news of local musician Jess Lamb competing on the 14th season of American Idol, I’ve been watching and waiting for the initial audition episodes to end so we can really get into the competition and see more Jess. This week was the first half of Hollywood rounds, where some 200 contestants that received golden tickets during the aforementioned auditions before the judges — Keith Urban, Jennifer Lopez and Harry Connick, Jr. — converged under one roof. The musicians and singers will perform solo and as groups for the judges, who will gradually dwindle the crowd down to the top 24 finalists. Unfortunately for locals (Spoiler Alert), we got about 30 seconds of Jess Lamb air time between this week’s two episodes. But on the upside, she’s still in the game! On Wednesday’s episode, the judges surprised a room full of contestants, telling them a select few would be called onstage to perform right then. For viewers at home, we’ve seen these folks before — they’re the ones we saw audition and receive golden tickets (but keep in mind there were many more than what we saw), the judges’ “most memorable auditions.” But they don’t know that. For those in the crowd, it seems like random contestants were pulled up to perform in front of their competition with no immediate feedback from the panel of mega-stars. And the judges were continuously bewildered as to why these kids were coming up scared shitless. Highlights: First up was Jax, who looks like a PG-13 Ke$ha that got puked on by Forever 21, but gave a really cool cover of “Toxic” by Britney Spears. Walking New York stereotype Sal was also called. According to the show he’s 19, but this man is definitely at least 45 judging by his voice, appearance and penchant for standards (his name is Sal for crying out loud). Afro’ed Adam — who gave a boisterous performance of “Born to be Wild” in his audition — surprised everyone with a softer side that the judges didn’t seem to like. Fast-forward through what seemed like a million 15-year-olds that made me feel like a stale prune… And it was nice to see Garret, the blind cowboy with a voice of a thousand Country angels. He so needs to be in the top 24. After making their way through the list, the judges called everyone who performed that day to the stage — around 38 hopefuls. Again, clearly many more performed than what we had seen in the episode — including our homegirl, Jess Lamb! Despite some shaky performances, they were all immediately advanced to the next round. We didn’t get more of than a glance at her, but Jess is safe this week! Everyone else in the audience — about 175 kids who were mostly convinced at this point that they were garbage people — were also off the chopping block for the moment, and would be performing later. When these contestants returned, they lined up onstage 10 at a time to perform for the judges. One by one, they gave a little spiel and gave a quick performance. After each group of 10 performed, eliminations were immediate. The group of 175 was cut in half. Cue the crying footage! At one point toward the end of Wednesday’s episode, we saw JLo have a DIVA MOMENT (OK, not really) and talking about how cold she was in the theater. Up pops “19-year-old” Sal again, offering a coat he’s got back at his hotel room. “I have a wonderful 2011 Merlot. We could split it,” he said. Can we please investigate this guy, Idol? If 28-year-old Jess is at the end of the age spectrum, middle-aged men should be prohibited. And if he is 19, the kid's got hooch in his room! Thursday’s episode unfolded last night, and still no real airtime for Jess. It opened with the remaining contestants (the non-memorable auditions — wah, waahh). Alexis Gomez, a 22-year-old Dayton, Ohio resident, was shown performing — she advanced to the next round. In an off-stage scene, it looks like there’s a budding romance between Jax and Dreadlock Pirate a.k.a. Qassim (why why why is this happening). All remaining contestants after cuts are brought onstage and asked to split themselves into groups of four. With around 100 people, this was udder madness and horrible planning that resulted in one person — another Alexis (Poor Alexis D.G.) — left with NO ONE. So sad! I feel for you, Alexis D.G.! But don’t worry, Sal came to the rescue and invited her to join his group to make a fivesome. The groups of four were given a song to perform a cappella-style and had one night to perfect it. Some of the groups eventually went to their hotel rooms but many stayed up all night preparing — something apparently none of these people had done before. They were so loopy! The next morning, the foursomes began to take the stage. At this point, I have a lot of questions: Are we cutting down to the final 24? Will these people go through another round of cuts before the live shows begin? Does anyone else want a reasonable timeline?  Sal’s group was about to go on when Alexis D.G. had some kind of panic attack or fainting spell — seriously, none of these people have ever gone without sleep before — and got real dramatic about it. She pulled herself together to go on with the group but immediately got wobbly and needed to be carried off stage. Another DIVA MOMENT! And that’s where the episode ends. Hope you’re OK, Alexis! But we’ll have to wait to find out until next time [Ryan Seacrest voice] on…American Idol. Check out Wednesday’s episode here; Thursday’s here.
 
 

The Main Event

OTR’s new music venue and event space aspires to re-energize Main Street

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Vine Street in Over-the-Rhine usually receives all of the hosannas — and Guy Fieri’s overwhelming presence — but that’s about to change when The Woodward Theater opens on Main Street this month.   
by Charlie Harmon 10.14.2014
Posted In: Music History, Local Music at 12:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sudsys

These Walls Have Heard It All: Sudsy Malone's

When researching Bogart’s for the first of these columns, I discovered a place that used to be its side-stream neighbor. Sudsy Malone’s, which sat just across the street from Bogart’s until 2008, may be a well-known name to older Cincinnatians, but to those of my generation I imagine it’s a legend unheard. Sudsy’s, as those who knew it well referred to it, was more than just a bar or music venue. It was a laundromat. A gathering place of locals who fancied having a beer and hearing a tune as their clothes turned over in bubbly cleanliness. And while it was only open for a fraction of the time many of the big venues around here have been, it occupies a deep space in the history of Cincinnati and its local music scene. Refined searches and several page scrolls through Google turns up hardly anything on the former venue. I finally found a memorial Facebook page that further fascinated me, still only offering a brief and general history but filled with posts by former loyal patrons reminiscing of great times at the bar, offering tales of hilarious happenings along with images, videos and old posters to fill it all in with color. I wanted to know more in hopes of giving Sudsy’s its due place in Cincinnati music history. To understand where it all started and where it went from there, I talked to Janine Walz, a former managing partner who was around during the establishment’s heyday. Sudsy’s was originally owned by John Cioffi and opened in 1986. As I understand it, the idea was inspired by similar businesses popping up in the region such as Dirty Dungarees in Columbus. They serve beer, so you can sip some foam while listening to the groan of washers and dryers, but Dungaree’s was never quite a bar. They served drinks in more of a refreshment center style. Cioffi’s vision for Sudsy’s was different. The decision for the name came from a lot of scrawling and scratching by Cioffi and his family. “They just had a long list of names that they would write down as they were brainstorming, and then they started crossing names out until it was down to Soapy Tucker’s or Sudsy Malone’s,” Walz says. Michael Sharp, the highly adored Renaissance man known for his ballet career in Cincinnati and who sadly just passed away in September, designed the character logos. Soapy Tucker was a sort of motherly figure, whereas Sudsy Malone was a true gangster. He became the face of the place, with his one-eyed look, suds-filled beer and coin-flipping hand becoming the calling card of the bar’s sign. Upon walking in the front door guests faced a 40-foot bar. “We would have competitions to see who could slide a mug full of beer the furthest down the bar without spilling it,” Walz recalls with a smile. They had little round cocktail tables covered with dark blue tablecloths and standard bar stools. The ceiling undulated with the movement of fans under which each had a globular light, providing a sort of soft ambiance to the bar. At the back of the building sat the laundry area, a brightly lit room where the fluorescent lights glinted off dozens of top-of-the-line washers and dryers. “I remember some of the bands complaining after a while about the laundry room lights because they would glow into the bar and kill the mood for the crowd,” Walz says. “We strung up some Christmas lights and would just turn those on instead when bands were on stage at night.” When the place first opened, however, the stage didn’t exist. Live music had never even been part of the idea. “It was only intended to be a laundromat with frosty-mug beer,” Walz says of the original plan. Walz recalls being the second laundry customer when Sudsy’s first opened. She worked at the Perkins just up Short Vine, and happened to be John Cioffi’s waitress the day he sat down to get food with the liquor agent that was supposed to be approving Sudsy’s license. “When they were finishing lunch he asked me to come a few doors down to talk to him about a job,” she says. “I figured it was the same distance from home and might pay better, so I went. Next thing I knew I was hired on as a manager.” In other words, she was there from the start. Walz watched the bar being built, and she knew it when it was just a place for people to wash clothes and have a drink, the crowd rarely exceeding 10 people. Only months after the place opened, a local band called The Thangs approached the owners with the idea to play music. Essentially, they just wanted a place to gig when nowhere else would let them. After some hesitation, Sudsy’s let them do it, and much to their surprise the first show was packed with about 100 people. Sudsy’s wasn’t expecting this, and they completely sold out of every drop of beer they had stocked at the time. With such outrageous success, The Thangs wanted to come back. Before long, music became the detergent to Sudsy’s suds, responsible for consistently bringing in large crowds. At first they charged a very minimal cover, mostly so they had something to give the band, and offered a free soft-drink ticket with entry for additional incentive. By ’87 they were charging a $5 cover, although they would still let people in for free if they had a basket of laundry. This often resulted in washers full of abandoned clothes the next day, as people brought the clothes to get in and then simply forgot about them in the excitement of music and merriment. Over time, Sudsy’s developed a massive collection of forsaken threads. This memory sparked another for Walz: “I remember this guy that would show up about once every year driving a station wagon. He would take the clothes people had left over time and pack every inch of his car, literally. He would do something with them, I think donate them.” As the place continually packed in people like foam to the top of a mug — thanks to the highly praised booking magic of Dan McCabe (Now of MOTR Pub) — problems inevitably occurred that now seem laughable. The carpet in the bar area became so matted and disgusting that it resembled tile, so Walz had it ripped out and replaced with wood. The men’s bathroom was a story of its own. Widely known as “Worst Men’s Bathroom,” Walz said she wouldn’t go near it, even almost buying stainless steel sheets to layer on it so she could just hose it down at night. At one point the fire department came in and completely cleared house, although there wasn’t a single flame or wisp of smoke. The building’s stated capacity was far under how many people they would pack in, and one night they had to count the crowd back in, one by one. Eventually they completely stopped the music for a period of time to get the building up to code. Despite its small size, Sudsy’s brought in now-major acts that were rising at the time — Beck, Smashing Pumpkins and Red Hot Chili Peppers — while also helping breed local acts like The Afghan Whigs and Over The Rhine. Almost all the music was original, save some special events like Grateful Dead night. Even on nights they weren’t playing themselves, members of bands could always be found among the crowd. The music scene at the time was like a circle, made up of bands and fans that truly appreciated music and enjoyed simply watching people express themselves creatively. Bands would come out and support other bands. Non-musicians would out come and support them all. Even bands and celebrities that were too big to play there live in the storybooks. Popularly known folks like Jackson Browne, "Weird Al" Yankovic and James Taylor stopped in to wash clothes or use the phone. Kate Pierson (B52s) and Chrissie Hynde (The Pretenders) came by during their Tide protest to pass out literature in affiliation with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Walz recalls the afternoon before a Jefferson Airplane concert at Riverbend when the bar was pretty empty and there were four guys hanging out doing laundry and drinking a beer. They were worried about their cab not showing up and frantically trying to figure out how to get to their hotel — so Walz drove them. Only after dropping them off did she realize the reason the dudes were so worried about being late. Walz showed me the blueprint of the building, and again lit up when she pointed out the wash sink in the laundry room. “Some crazy celebrity took a bath in that sink one night,” she says. “I’m pretty sure it was Marilyn Manson.” And these stop-ins aren’t the only “celebrity” claims to fame for Sudsy’s. The bar itself was given awards throughout the years from Cincinnati’s former alternative weekly Everybody’s News, from “Best Looking Staff” to “Best Rock Club,” and even “Best Place to Ditch a Blind Date.” They were also named the best bar in Ohio in ’93 by Creem magazine, courtesy of The Connells. However, all the press, awards and celebrities aside, Walz says what really made the place special were the local patrons. “It was like a family, people were loyal,” she says. “They would look out for others, and for the bands, and would always defend Sudsy’s no matter what. Without the people, everybody, the people that watched the bands, the bands themselves, Sudsy’s was nothing.” The bar would even cater specifically to bands they knew well, for example stocking extra Hudy Delight when The Thangs would come back because their crowd loved to drink it. There were also folks she referred to as “family bums”. There was Archie Harrison, a local homeless man who would help clean at night for a little money. During the days he would just hang out, always being jolly and telling jokes sharing what little bit of anything he might have had that day to share. Then there was Sonny, a good-hearted man who hid behind a hulk of a body. Sonny would guard the back door, despite never being asked. “I remember one time one of the dryers was broken and the glass wasn’t in there to cover the hole,” she says. “We had an out of order sign but, you know, I guess it disappeared. No surprise there. Anyway, we had given him some money to do laundry and he used that dryer, just picking up the clothes as they fell out of hole and throwing them right back in. It was hysterical. When we asked him why he didn’t switch dryers he said he didn’t want to bother us and cause trouble.” As the Millennium rolled around, a lot of the core patrons began settling down and showing up less often. The crime in the area would keep people away, and the decline in the laundry business lowered their numbers even further. Walz had just put $12,000 into a new sprinkler system, still trying to keep the building code-worth, but she, too, was moving toward settling down. “I was pregnant at that pointm too, and I was just kind of done working in the bar business,” she says. That, along with clashes between Walz and McCabe about making money versus booking acts that would be huge for the scene led to Walz selling the establishment by 2002. While it seems that Sudsy’s wasn’t as glorious after that time as it once had been, the venue remained open until 2008, at which time it closed its doors for good. The old building at 2626 Vine Street remains a boarded up relic. One of the most revealing things Walz said during our talk about Sudsy’s was, “If you were there, you were part of the reason you are here talking to me today.” It saddens me that I didn’t have to opportunity to be there, but for all those who were, as well as for the others that might not have known what this place ever was, this is just a small piece of the big apple pie that was Sudsy Malone’s Rock n’ Roll Laundry & Bar.      
 
 
by Jessica Baltzersen 01.28.2014
Posted In: Local Music at 04:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
hanna puthoff

Local Guitarist Wins Master Class with Synyster Gates of Avenged Sevenfold

For most musicians, a trip to Hollywood to train with a legendary Rock star would be nothing more than a dream, but for local guitarist David Puthoff, it’s a reality. After winning a nationwide competition, the 19-year-old was one of 10 top prize winners chosen to be flown to Los Angeles to attend a VIP “Master Class” with Avenged Sevenfold’s lead guitarist, Synyster Gates.   The Master Class with Synyster Gates of Avenged Sevenfold Contest, presented by Guitar Center, was a nationwide search to find the country’s most talented and creative guitarists. More than 1,500 contestants downloaded the provided signature Avenged Sevenfold backing tracks of their choice, to which they were challenged to re-write and add their own original guitar performance. The competition was assessed in two parts: the popularity of fan growth over social media and the skill of the contestant’s performance, originality, style and technique by a panel of judges. For his entry, Puthoff wrote and performed a refreshing duo combining both acoustic and electric guitar. The unique marriage of his classical guitar knowledge with his heavy-metal background worked in his favor, as it was not only a fan favorite, but was hand chosen by Gates himself in the final decision making process. “It truly is a dream come true,” Puthoff says. “When I got the call that I had won, my heart dropped. I was completely speechless. With Avenged Sevenfold’s City of Evil album artwork inked on Puthoff’s forearm, it’s evident that the group is his favorite band. The seductive dark tone of the Hard Rock/Metal band allured Puthoff in the sixth grade and the rest was Rock history. “I always admired the band’s extreme uniqueness and use of tonality,” Puthoff says. But it was Gates’ rapid riffs and rhythms that mesmerized then-12-year-old Puthoff, making him his ultimate guitar hero. “He’s the reason why I wanted to play and get good at guitar,” he says. In addition to the trip, which has been delayed due to weather, Puthoff won a Schecter Synyster Gates Special electric guitar, a behind-the-scenes tour of the Schecter factory and an Ernie Ball accessory prize pack. Although the bells and whistles are an added bonus, he’s really just looking forward to meeting and learning from his idol. “I really want to take in everything he teaches us,” Puthoff says. Puthoff wants every piece of advice he can get, especially when it comes to how Gates got his start and achieved success. As lead guitarist of his own band, The Requiem, Puthoff is looking to use this trip as an opportunity to get an insiders point of view on how to make it in the music industry. Puthoff and the other four members of The Requiem have been working hard to make a name for themselves here in Cincinnati. Performing at venues across the Tristate area and winning second place in a local battle of the bands competition, they’ve already built up a heavy amount of fan support and are currently working on recording and releasing their first album. Although Puthoff’s skilled playing looks effortless, he’s been perfecting his craft and technique for over a decade. Fueled by countless hours of practice, dedication and hard work, he’s always strived to be the very best. At age 8, Puthoff started taking guitar lessons at Keller Music on the Westside of Cincinnati. In 2005, when the owner wanted to sell the store, Puthoff’s parents stepped in to purchase and take over as owners. As a Westside favorite for more than 40 years, they wanted to keep the business running so their son and daughter could continue to take lessons at their beloved childhood music domain. In 2012 Puthoff joined forces with the family to become a teacher at Keller Music. The new and improved business recently renovated and expanded their store where they sell retail and offer lessons in guitar, bass guitar, drums, piano, mandolin and ukulele to adults and children of all ages. “The youngest student I taught was 5 years old, and the oldest was 75,” Puthoff says. Although Puthoff enjoys teaching, his real love is performing. His dream is what any musical artist’s is: trying to make it big. He hopes for The Requiem to catch their big break, move to the innovative land of California and tour the world as full-fledged signed musicians. Although the starry-eyed guitarist has dreams of his “big breakthrough,” it truly is the music that ignites his passion and love for what he does. “Music to me is a shoulder to cry on or a friend to celebrate with that will always be there for me,” he says. "It’s one of the very few ways where I can put my true emotion into something and hopefully have others feel the same way I feel.” Check out Puthoff’s winning entry video here.
 
 
by Zohair Hussain 12.19.2013
Posted In: Interview, Local Music at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
snapshot

Brick, Melody and Mortar: The Rise and Enthrall of Molly Sullivan

It was sometime back in September that I stumbled upon the story of Chvrches’ Lauren Mayberry, and her piece in The Guardian about the unfortunate realities she faced as a female musician. Only days later, I heard the stories of classical composers wearing their own diadems of misogyny. All these forces were crumbling away at what I once believed to be the most progressive industry we had at our hands.  With such revelations came a personal desire for truth at a closer proximity. I honed in my lens and turned it on the state of our own music scene, and the circumstances of female musicians in the Queen City. I may have stumbled a bit the first time I saw Molly Sullivan perform. It could have been the champagne. It could have been the wine. It could have been the sheer, uprooting shock of such a sneakily sultry voice filling all the quiet corners of a room. It was 2011 and the setting was a birthday party at the neo-historic Marburg Hotel, and local heroes Shadowraptr had just finished their set in the basement — a lush and operatic performance of their usual brand of psychedelic Prog-Rock, with Jazz sensibility. They didn’t disappoint with an expectedly raucous presentation, and we didn’t back down as an ever energetic crowd. It was in a quiet aftermath, among friends and fellows just as imbibed as our beer-soaked shirts, that I wove my way through a hallway maze and sauntered into a living room with an organ against its back wall. At its helm sat Molly Sullivan. As she would come to tell me nearly three years later, “Going back to when I first started playing out as a singer songwriter, I always felt this extreme pressure and insecurity of being a female musician…whose music was tending to be more on the delicate side of things, an emotionally driven side of things. It required a little stillness from the crowd.” But back looking back on that night in March 2011, stillness was inevitable. Warm from wine and an approaching spring, the handful of us that sat in the living room did so with an active passivity.  But even as heads lolled against neighbors’ shoulders or against the walls at our backs, there was an intensity in every pair of eyes that I glanced into; all were watching, focused, as Molly struck a chord and then another, taking us through the coziest part of the evening with two or three ballads of life, lovelorn. It was an intimacy that couldn’t have escaped those of us even if it had tried, and only a brief, drunken sampling of where Sullivan had started her story, rising to the ranks of the recognized, respected and regaled. Before that, she was front woman for the electronically infused No No Knots and a few months after that, she would play out as a solo artist with a backing band, making a stop at The Heights Music Festival and a New Year’s Eve show at the Southgate House Revival in 2012, before a brief hiatus kept her choruses hushed. Sullivan admits that a lot of the anxious cogs of her earlier years were weighed on heavily by being a female musician in a primarily male-dominated scene. “I feel like it’s a lot easier for men as artists,” Sullivan Says, “generally, because you have the potential to be the heartthrob, and also it’s not necessarily a sissying thing to go to for a guy. So I feel like there’s more of an audience inherently built in.” In the later months of 2013, however, she re-emerged, armed with a loop-accentuated sound and a solo confidence that she speaks fondly of. Crafting songs, sonically clad with vocal layering and solid to the string guitar work, Sullivan took her one-woman symphony on the Cincinnati circuit, to high acclaim — winning the solo artist bracket of FB’s local “Last Band Standing 2013” battle of the bands, and earning herself a spot on one of the participating MidPoint Music Festival stages. Sullivan had dedicated time to playing earlier shows in spots she would normally not perform, in venues and around crowds she would normally not consider being her primary audience. She says she found new courage in taking these risks. Though initially unsure about even participating in the event at FB’s, Sullivan came to find her hesitation was unnecessary. “I made some assumption about the clientele there – it’s kind of known to be like a bro bar,” Sullivan explains. “I was thinking, ‘They’re not gonna get my art.’ That ended up not being true.” When asked about the progression of her performance presentation, Sullivan says, “I think I’ve actually come to learn — just by doing it when I’m in a bar and everybody is silent — just like recognizing that there’s something captivating about the simplicity and the emotion of being present with your songs. It’s a really empowering thing when people are dedicated to listening and joining you in that experience.” Sullivan also recognized the power of community, and the part that earnest encouragement from within the Cincinnati scene played in her career as a musician. One pillar in her support group is claimed by The Daughters of The Midwest, an ensemble stage set of premier, female musicians dominating the Cincinnati area. “I’ve definitely kind of geared my energy towards being supportive of other female musicians,” Sullivan says, “supporting Kelly (Fine), Mia (Carruthers), Maya (Banatwala). And now that I’m back out there again, because of the support that I’ve been shown.” “I think it’s a really powerful thing to have a female musician community to support each other,” she continues. “And as soon as I got back into it, it made it a lot easier to go with the flow and be excited for people wholeheartedly.” And looking outside of the just the female musician community, Sullivan vehemently recognizes the support of Cincinnati as a whole. Sullivan expresses an appreciation for her time playing with The No No Knots, as well as the support she received from the members of Cincinnati’s Marburg Collective. As she explains, "There’s mostly positive reinforcement floating around. There’s kind of this really solid to the earth community here that exists that wants to support." She admits that what hides outside of Cincinnati is what scares her most. We traded stories and conversations about recent revelations of ignorance and misogynistic skeletons in some of contemporary music’s most renowned scenes, tales of classical composers saying woman have no place in conducting pieces. Sullivan acknowledges being weary of “the whole, big wide world,” with such possibilities floating around in clouds of reality. “Cincinnati scares me in its own ways,” she says. “Almost what scares me more is beyond what’s Cincinnati, just the competitiveness that can be fruitful if you’re successful in the game. And I think part of me has been afraid of success, because with that success, you know what’s gonna come: it’s gonna be that banter online, all those anonymous people hemorrhaging bullshit…Why bother?” Even with such uncertainty for outside markets, Sullivan exhibits an insight and strength that propels her forward, even more so because of her acknowledgements of the bad that can come with the good. She says she’s learning to navigate her way around “the hemorrhaging bullshit.” Her awareness of everything that can dampen an otherwise well lit stage is what makes her voice so definitive on the conversation about the regressive mentality of misogyny that can still exist in our present day music-scape. There exists within Molly Sullivan a partnership between community appreciation and individualistic impetus. She acknowledges the power of community backing, saying it’s a “powerful thing to have a female musician community to support each other.” And she recognizes the groundwork that’s been laid out in years past. “We’ve seen the rise of a few female fronted bands come through,” Sullivan says, “and people are more willing to be excited for that and support it.” (She cites the Seedy Seeds and Wussy as pioneers for female musicianship.) Sullivan is aware of where we’ve been and where we are. But what’s more, she’s ready to take us to where we need to be. And she’s ready to do that with a self-made spirit. “I’m getting to a point where I don’t give a fuck really,” Sullivan says. It was with a new impetus that she’s approached her musicianship. “I’ve grown stronger as a female musician,” she says. “Now I’m just kind of like, well, if you don’t want to listen to it then fuck you, you don’t have to be here. It took me a long time to get to that point, and I still kind of have some insecurity about it. But most of the time I’m just like, ‘Molly, grow a pair, get over it.’ ” Sullivan also explains the intentionality behind her current solo-set performances. Much in the same vein of playing in new venues, under possibly uncomfortable lights, she exhibits a drive to explore her boundaries, and expand past her limitations. “I’ve chosen to do these things by myself,” she says. “If I’m going to play with a band later, I need to be OK playing solo first. It’s been really empowering, doing all of that.”  She proves herself to be relentless and, though hurt, unscarred by the outside forces of misinterpretation and misogynistic pressures. It’s with a knowing, weathered paddle that she navigates these future streams. And it seems she couldn’t be more pleased with the direction she’s headed. “So far, it’s been really lovely being back.” She takes a moment, at the end of our conversation, to reflect out loud. “Would you look at that? I did that. And I don’t need anybody else. I’m all about collaboration, but it’s really good to know that I don’t need anybody. I’m capable.”
 
 
by Mike Breen 02.08.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cheyennemariemize1

Squeeze the Day for Feb. 8

Cheyenne Marie Mize at MOTR, plus Today in Music with OutKast and a James Dean musical tribute

Music Tonight: Louisville Indie/Folk singer/songwriter Cheyenne Marie Mize has been on a fast track in the music biz over the past year. A member of a couple of rootsy acts in the rich Louisville music scene, once she broke out on her own, she began to draw increased attention for her lovely, ethereal sound. Last year when Mize performed in town, she was on the verge of releasing a new EP, but it was delayed … for good reason. Mize had inked a deal with Yep Rock Records (home to Nick Lowe, Liam Finn, Fountains of Wayne, John Doe and Paul Weller) and that EP, We Don't Need, became her first release for the label. Just released Jan. 24, We Don't Need fleshes out Mize's wispy sound (particularly with some creative rhythmic additives), but that dreamy, ghostly soul still hovers above each of the five songs. Click here to read more about Mize then head to MOTR Pub tonight to catch her free show (with special guest Margaret Darling of The Seedy Seeds). Below, enjoy a session Mize did recently for LaundroMatinee.com.

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