WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by John Hamilton 05.04.2015 123 days ago
at 12:46 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Reel Redux: The Revenant

The most recent recipient of the Best Director Oscar, Alejandro González Iñárritu (Birdman), will have a new film for 2015 —The Revenant. This movie tells the true story of early-19th entury frontiersman Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio), who was mauled by a bear during a trapping expedition and is left for dead by his hunting partners (Tom Hardy, Will Poulter, Domhnall Gleeson). But it turns out that he’s alive and is now on a quest for revenge. Some of you are probably tilting your head and wondering why I’m talking about this film instead of something like the new string of Disney live action adaptations that are coming up. The reason is because this is essentially a remake of a 1971 Richard Harris (the original Dumbledore) movie called Man in the Wilderness. It’s a similar story but with names changed, more characters added and the main character, Zachary Bass, is only targeting one person, Captain Henry (John Huston). I think Man in the Wilderness is an underrated gem from the ‘70s about a man’s struggle for survival and what motivates him to continue his quest. But even though this is a film that I like a lot, I don’t have a problem with it being remade. First of all, it is trying something a bit different with the story and style. For one thing, Iñárritu seems to be sticking closer to what actually happened. He’s keeping it to just about Glass and his three hunting companions, which I’m sure will be very engaging. In the original film it just kept the drama between the relationship with Bass and Henry all the while trying to juggle more than a dozen members of the expedition; with this small group of characters we get a chance to get engaged with all of them. One interesting aspect that Iñárritu is doing is that apparently he is filming in natural light — no studio lighting, no artificial lighting or anything. This could add a really nice flavor to the movie. This could help emphasize the survival aspect especially given the fact that it’s in the summer time in a rather untamed part of the country. Now, as for the casting choices, I’m mixed when it comes to the choice of Leonardo DiCaprio as Hugh Glass. I mean, there’s nothing really about him that screams mountain man or frontiersman. But then again this could a very good role for him; it’s very different from his usual parts where he typically plays an overly confident one-percenter type or a wide eyed dreamer. It could be right up there with his performance as Calvin Candy in Django Unchained as something different and surprisingly suiting. Though I still would have preferred the original casting choice — Christian Bale. As of right now, this is a film I’m really looking forward to seeing. Yes, I do recommend the original Harris film, but this new retelling may inspire those in the future and may bring in a whole new audience. Remakes/retellings are not always a bad thing, people, it’s best to keep an open mind. 
 
 

Django Unchained

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 26, 2012
Much like Inglorious Basterds, his revisionist take on Jewish revenge on the Nazis, Quentin Tarantino tackles the curious American institution of slavery in Django Unchained.  
by Jason Gargano 11.11.2011
at 03:59 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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Friday Movie Roundup: Lighten Up, Leo, Edition

When will Leonardo DiCaprio lighten up? It doesn't look like it's going to happen anytime soon. Asked recently if he would consider doing something besides the heavy dramatic lifting of recent years (see Gangs of New York, The Aviator, Blood Diamond, The Departed, Body of Lies, Revolutionary Road, Shutter Island, Inception and now J. Edgar), the 37-year-old actor responded with this to-the-point rebuttal: “Why would I want to do something I would consider a profound waste of time?" Alright, then.

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Inception (Review)

Christopher Nolan gives the gift of another brainy blockbuster

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 14, 2010
'Inception' finds writer/director Christopher Nolan in familiar territory as his previous reality-bending works ('Memento,' 'The Prestige,' 'The Dark Knight'), and the result is something almost as thrilling to contemplate as it is to watch. Even if you now know a little about what 'Inception' is about, you don’t even know the half of it. Grade: A.  

Hubble 3-D (Review)

IMAX gem zips audience through vastness, beauty and colors of space

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 17, 2010
Leonardo DiCaprio effectively narrates this 43-minute IMAX 3-D journey into the farthest reaches of outer space. The film follows the Space Shuttle Atlantis on its 2009 rescue mission, and the eye-popping views of space shift into warp drive when the Hubble telescope substitutes for the IMAX camera lens to provide incredibly clear images of galaxies, stars and nebulae millions of light years away. Grade: B-plus.  

Shutter Island (Review)

Scorsese and DiCaprio score again with complex and engrossing mystery

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 17, 2010
Martin Scorsese's latest is a gorgeously stylized psychological thriller full of darkly lush horror that torments its obsessed protagonist. As a former World War II veteran and U.S. Marshal, Leonardo DiCaprio hits every psychological mark that Scorsese dynamically orchestrates against a vast metaphorical natural and unnatural setting. Grade: A-.   

Revolutionary Road (Review)

Strong performances by Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio drive look at '60s suburban life

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 14, 2009
This is not the sentimental romanticism of the two lead actors' 'Titanic.' In fact, it is much harder-edged and much less compassionate than its director Sam Mendes' previous 'American Beauty,' which mixed humor and a hallucinatory dreaminess into its similar tragic theme. Grade: B.  

Body of Lies (Review)

Russell Crowe and Leonardo DeCaprio provide espionage thrills without digging too deep

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 8, 2008
Throughout David Ignatius’ 2007 novel Body of Lies, you can feel the potential for creating something ... deeper. While the surface markings were those of an age-of-terrorism espionage thriller, there were also hints of Mystic River author Dennis Lehane: the portrayal of a world in which moral decision-making was virtually impossible and the best a soul could hope for was to make the least immoral decision.  

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