WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.27.2014 22 hours ago
Posted In: News at 09:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Local prosecutors will investigate Crawford shooting, former Kroger CEO says his pay was "ludicrous" and the sad story of a 9-year-old with an uzi

Morning y'all! After a rough start (a bit more on that later), I'm here and ready to give you the news.Two prosecutors from Hamilton County will lead the state’s investigation into the police shooting death of John Crawford III, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced yesterday.Stacey DeGraffenreid and Mark Piepermeierand were appointed by the AG yesterday. Piepermeierand, of Sharonville, heads the Hamilton County Prosecutor’s office criminal division and has handled many high-profile cases in that capacity. He’s responsible for reviewing all police use-of-force issues in Hamilton County and has done so for the past 15 years.Police shot Crawford inside a Beavercreek Walmart Aug. 6. Another customer called 911 when he saw Crawford with what he thought was an assault rifle. Officers arrived and demanded Crawford drop the weapon, which turned out to be a pellet gun from the store. When he didn’t comply immediately, officers shot him and he died. Crawford’s family, along with activists, have called for answers as to why he was shot.• The state of Ohio has ordered embattled restaurant Mahogany’s closed after it didn’t follow state sales tax rules. The restaurant on The Banks has struggled to pay rent and loans owed to the city and was almost evicted in April. The restaurant was able to catch up on the rent but still owes more than $300,000 to the city in loans. Owner Liz Rogers has said that the restaurant has struggled after $80,000 was embezzled from the establishment and a rough winter kept business slow. Rogers has also pointed the finger toward someone in the city’s administration who she says has been leaking untrue information about the business. Mahogany’s can reopen after it pays back the undisclosed amount it owes the state in sales taxes.• Think sky-high executive pay is kind of absurd? You’re not alone. Former Kroger CEO David Dillion said during a panel on management at the Aspen Ideas Summit last month that his paycheck for leading the company was “ludicrous." A video of that summit is just now trickling out, with Huffington Post covering the statement yesterday.Dillion’s $13 million paycheck last year was actually below the $15 million average for CEOs in America, which makes his compensation “seem a little more responsible,” he said during the summit. “Still you’d argue, I think,” he continued, “it was pretty damn high.” Dillion said his eight-figure pay package started out fairly reasonable but ballooned out of control as Kroger’s stock went up. That’s a terrible problem to have. That dang stock price, that dang paycheck, both just rising and rising and rising like the temperature needle on my poor struggling car as I sat in traffic this morning (yes, my car overheated on the way here and I’m bitter). There’s just nothing you can do about that. If only Dillion had like, RUN THE COMPANY or something, maybe he could have gotten that ludicrous pay rate under control. Oh, wait…• Speaking of big ole billowy clouds o’ cash, former 20102 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is on his way to Kentucky to help make it rain for Sen. Mitch McConnell, who is fighting a tough battle against his Democratic opponent Andrea Lundergan-Grimes. McConnell has been pulling out all the conservative A-listers to raise cash, a sign that he’s seriously worried he could lose his seat in what looks to be one of the most contentious and expensive Senate campaigns in history. It’s certainly the fight of his career, but the stakes go higher than that. Every seat matters come November, when Democrats will struggle to maintain their slim majority in the Senate. Should Republicans take enough seats, they’ll run both that chamber and the House, making President Obama’s last two years in office one big bummer.• Another politician experiencing a big ole bummer right now is Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who was indicted a couple weeks back on some pretty serious felony charges involving abuse of power. It's a long, complicated story that involves a DUI (not Perry's), some backroom dealings, a possibly shady cancer research organization and more. So much more. Anyway, Perry's been kinda sailing through this whole thing, smirking in his mugshot and getting ice cream afterward, the whole deal. He's also played it well politically, refusing public money for his defense team of all-star attorneys. But he recently dropped a comment about that that is less than great PR. He's not turning down public money for his defense because it's the right thing to do, but "to keep folks from grousing about it," he said. The whole Texas-sized imbroglio (gotta love that word) has also hit Perry where it hurts: his holster. • I usually try to end with some weird news to lighten the mood a lil, but this story is just crazy and sad and confusing. A shooting instructor in Arizona died Monday while teaching a 9-year-old girl how to shoot an uzi. The girl lost control of the semi-automatic weapon due to its recoil as she was firing, and the instructor was shot in the head. An investigation is ongoing to determine the exact sequence of events.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.26.2014 48 hours ago
Posted In: News at 08:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

City to offer transgender benefits; Sen. Brown: eat at Wendy's; newsflash: Americans don't trust cops

Hey all. It's morning news, and I'm earlier than usual. I'm as surprised as you are.The city of Cincinnati has announced it will cover medically necessary transgender surgery for employees under its insurance plan. A majority of city council signed a letter urging the change, which was then initiated by interim City Manager Scott Stiles. The city will be the first in Ohio to do so, joining only Berkeley, Calif., Portland, Ore., San Francisco and Seattle offering the benefit. A mental health professional will have to agree that the procedure is necessary for an employee before it is covered. The change will kick in next year and is a way for the city to stay competitive and attract the best job candidates possible, said Councilman Chris Seelbach. Many large companies, including P&G, offer transgender-inclusive benefits. • Oops again. Duke Energy revised their estimates for the amount of diesel fuel it spilled into the Ohio River last week up to 9,000 gallons. The company previously reported it thought about 5,000 gallons had spilled when an oil transfer valve was left open Aug. 18 at the company’s New Richmond power plant. On the positive side, the cleanup of that spill is almost complete, and no adverse affects to wildlife or residents living along the river have been reported.• A shifty fast-food sovereign looks to leave the country he rules for cold northern lands to save a few gold coins. Meanwhile, Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown really wants you to grab a Frosty and a Crave Case this weekend in protest. Brown is up in arms about a proposed merger between Burger King and Canadian-based Tim Horton’s. The deal would create one of the world’s largest fast food conglomerates and see the king abdicating his burger throne in Miami, Florida for Canada. That part rankles Brown, who says the merger could well be a corporate inversion, or a move from the U.S. meant to evade corporate taxes. He’s encouraging his constituents to grab some grub from Ohio-based companies like Wendy’s or White Castle.“Burger King’s decision to abandon the United States means consumers should turn to Wendy’s Old Fashioned Hamburgers or White Castle sliders,” Brown said in a press release that contained little hint anyone responsible was aware how hilarious that sounds. I’m going to avoid all this royal intrigue and continue to get my burgers from the grill outside of Avril-Bleh’s downtown.  • A national gun control group called Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense has started a petition asking Cincinnati-based Kroger to ban open carry in its stores. The group cites recent violence in the company’s stores, including a Georgia murder-suicide in June and another shooting incident in the same state that left two people injured. Kroger has said that the safety of its customers is important and that its policy is to follow prevailing state law. Open carry laws vary by state, with some states like Ohio placing few restrictions on your right to tote a deadly weapon around while you’re picking out breakfast cereal or cilantro for a nice homemade pico de gallo. Moms Demand Action received criticism recently when it was revealed the group received $50 million from noted gun control advocate and ex-New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who, anonymous sources reveal, is not in fact a mom.• A national Pew Research poll released yesterday found that Americans have very little faith in law enforcement’s ability to hold its officers accountable for misconduct, engage in good race-relations practices and use an appropriate level of force. This distrust held true for respondents of all races but was especially marked among those in the black community, where nine out of 10 respondents said the police do a “fair” to “poor” job. The poll comes as the police shooting of Mike Brown, an unarmed black teen in a St. Louis suburb, has set off a national debate over police conduct, especially as it relates to race. • Finally, this new photography project by the New Orleans Times-Picayune is worth a look. You can slide between photos of New Orleans just after Hurricane Katrina and recent pics of what the same areas look like today to get a powerful look at how the city has — and in some places hasn’t, really — recovered from the disaster.
 
 

Group Asks Kroger to Support Farm Workers

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 1, 2014
A national group working to convince companies to change the way they buy produce picketed Kroger’s annual shareholder meeting June 26.  
by Nick Swartsell 06.26.2014 62 days ago
Posted In: Labor Unions at 01:52 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Group Asks Kroger to Support Farm Workers

Coalition for Immokalee Workers pushes for higher wages, better treatment

Oscar Otzoy, center left, stands with fellow protesters outside a Kroger shareholder meeting at Music HallNick Swartsell A national group working to convince companies to change the way they buy produce picketed Kroger's annual shareholder meeting Thursday.About 100 activists showed up, holding signs and chanting as shareholders filed into the meeting at Music Hall. Some were local, while others came from Columbus, Florida and elsewhere.The group organizing the event, Coalition of Immokalee Workers, is based in Immokalee, Fla., and pushes for higher wages and improved working conditions for farm laborers. A large amount of produce production takes place in Florida and throughout the South, and the industry is rife with complaints of worker exploitation and mistreatment.Hundreds of thousands of farm workers labor in Florida, and many make just pennies per pound picked, meaning it can take picking a couple tons a day to make a living wage. That’s if they make any money at all. Florida has prosecuted a number of cases of slave labor in the agricultural industry in the past decade and a half, leading to the discovery of more than 1,000 people being exploited for unpaid slave labor. The adverse conditions affect people of color disproportionately. A study by the Center for Racial Justice Innovation found that 50 percent of low-wage workers in the food industry are people of color, and that 65 percent of low-wage farm workers are Hispanic.CIW started in 1993 as a small, local coalition working to improve these conditions, specifically working with tomato pickers. The group began near the city of Immokalee in southwest Florida, known as “the tomato capital of the world.” The organization had big success pushing for higher wages and better treatment and has grown to become a national-level organizing group for workers.Oscar Otzoy picks produce and advocates for farm labor rights. He’s working in Columbus now but lived in Immokalee for eight years before that. He's been involved in the coalition to improve farm workers’ rights that entire time. He says before the coalition, working days in the fields were long, and workers had little recourse when they were mistreated. “Back then, you’d work long, hard hours, and if you were abused in the fields, if you were a victim of sexual harassment, as many women are, there was no system,” he said. “If workers wanted to complain, they would be fired on the spot. That’s all changing now.” Otzoy says the life of a farm laborer can be hard, especially without groups like the CIW. “You wake up very early in the morning, usually about 4 a.m., and then get on a bus to the field to work,” said Otzoy, describing a typical day before he joined the coalition. “But when you get there, you usually don’t start working until about 10 a.m., when the pesticides have dried and it’s safe to enter. All the time in between is unpaid.”Protesters picket as Kroger shareholders enter Music HallNick SwartsellThe CIW’s Fair Food Program, an effort to address some of the hardships of work in the produce industry, pushes for an extra cent per pound paid to workers, supports a code of conduct for companies and educates workers about their rights. CIW says the Fair Food Program has resulted in $12 million in extra pay for workers since it was first instituted. McDonalds, Burger King, Taco Bell, Subway, Chipotle, Trader Joes, Whole Foods and Wal Mart, among other large companies responsible for billions of dollars in the produce trade, have all participated in the Fair Food Program. Some staunch holdouts include Wendy’s and Publix, a Southern grocery store chain. Kroger is another company that has yet to join in. “We’ve been here every year, and we’re trying to grow our numbers,” said Sameerah Ahmad, a local organizer working with CIW at the protest. “We’ve been organizing these protests for a few years. We want to show escalation and pressure and show we’re not going way. Kroger is the nation’s largest grocer after Wal-Mart, with total sales of more than $34 billion. The chain has not yet responded to calls to join fair food efforts. While the company itself hasn’t participated directly in any known agricultural injustices, Ahmad said that as part of the produce industry, the company should make sure it’s sourcing its food ethically. “Kroger can take a big step by supporting workers’ rights in the fields,” she said.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 06.27.2014 61 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
p.g. sittenfeld.nar

Not-Quite-Morning News and Stuff

Cincinnati startups, downtown grocery and income inequality

So I'm a bit late with news this morning, or the morning was a bit early, one of those. It probably has something to do with CityBeat winning six Cincinnati SPJ awards last night. Though I wasn't part of the team in 2013 when those awards were earned, I did my part by putting in extra hours celebrating. Anyway, enough about us. Here's what's going on in the world.Cincinnati’s startup community got some love yesterday when America Online cofounder Steve Case rolled into town with his Rise of the Rest tour, which celebrates entrepreneurs in American cities. Case praised Cincinnati’s progress in bringing vitality back to its downtown area and credited that renaissance at least in part to the city’s startups and young entrepreneurs. U.S. Chamber of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzger, who is riding shotgun on the tour, also praised the Queen City for the level of access startups have to the large corporations in town. She said what the city needs now is a big hit — a startup that really makes it big and shows the world that Cincinnati is a great place to start a business. Mayor John Cranley was in the mix as well, touting Cincinnati’s strengths as a marketing town. He called the city “the best place in the world” for marketing entrepreneurs. While that’s kind of like your parents talking about how awesome you are to their work colleagues (of course he’s going to say that), Cranley’s point holds some weight — with so many big companies in town needing all sorts of fresh ideas, it can’t hurt to be living at their doorstep if you’re hoping to do some business with them.One Cincinnati startup, called Frameri, got $100,000 from Case and an invitation to pitch their business in Washington, D.C. Frameri, which makes high-style glasses with interchangeable frames and lenses, beat out seven other local businesses in a pitch competition. The company is an alum of OTR’s business incubator The Brandery. No word from Case yet on my business idea, which involves a food delivery service that launches burritos from those pneumatic tubes you see in old bank building drive-thrus. Still waiting for that call, Steve…• In other downtown news, Kroger is adjusting its ideas about starting a grocery store in the Central Business District. The Business Courier reports that Kroger CEO Roger McMullen discussed the chain’s plans for a downtown store at yesterday’s annual shareholder meeting, revealing that less may be more in the company’s eyes. Kroger had been mulling a full-size store here but is now considering something smaller and more specialized.• Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld and other Democrats held an event this morning near UC criticizing Gov. John Kasich and the Ohio legislature for the low level of funding for higher education in the state. Democrats also gathered in Columbus to protest dwindling education spending, which they say make college unaffordable for many Ohio families. One talking point — Ohio’s budget spends less than 10 percent on higher education for the first time in four decades. Gov. Kasich has acknowledged that college affordability is a problem but says schools need to do more to cut costs and make sure degrees lead to good-paying jobs.• The Associated Press reports that Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office is having a difficult time documenting how it goes about choosing law firms for special assignments. DeWine says there’s a rigorous process used to vet firms and decide who gets the lucrative state contracts, but public records request by AP found… nothing. It’s entirely possible that the AG’s dog ate the records or that maybe DeWine just keeps all that info in his head. The revelation comes as allegations are being made that these kinds of contracts are often awarded to firms who donate to the state Republican party. DeWine’s opponent for the AG post, Cincinnati-based lawyer David Pepper, has said DeWine’s office is engaged in a “pay to play” arrangement. DeWine, however, says his office’s choices are transparent and fair.• A study by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found that political polarization, which is at an all-time high, contributes to income inequality. This is kind of like a two-for-one in the “hot political topics” world. The study doesn’t go so far as to nail down why the gap between America’s political ideologies tracks so closely with the gap in rich and poor Americans’ incomes, but it does make a couple guesses, which are worth reading about. Basically, it may have to do with the country’s rightward shift toward policies that tend to benefit more wealthy citizens. Or heck, maybe it’s just a big crazy coincidence and the tea party really will make everything great for everyone if we only embrace their Mad-Max style dreams for a government-less future. Could be.
 
 

Worst Week Ever!: Jan. 1-7

4 Comments · Wednesday, January 8, 2014
Bill Nye to debate anti-science creationist, Chris Finney gets kicked out of law firm and more in the worst week ever.  

Worst Week Ever!: April 17-23

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 24, 2013
WEDNESDAY APRIL 17: The Vermont House of Representatives last week approved a bill that will reduce the penalty for possessing up to an ounce of marijuana. The bill passed by a 2-to-1 margin, which shouldn’t come as much of surprise in the state that Phish is from.   

Cincinnati vs. The World 12.19.2012

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 19, 2012
Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed a measure into law that will crack down on puppy mills — inhumane, large-scale dog breeding operations run for profit, often resulting in severe neglect and abuse. CINCINNATI +1    

Jerky? Sure!

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 18, 2012
I’ve always had some sense of “beef jerky” over my lifetime. It’s always been in gas stations and convenient stores. And I’m certain I’ve eaten jerky before. Not en masse, but a bit. And not on a dare, even.   

March 21-27: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Americans like to multitask, as long as it doesn’t involve trying harder at their place of employment. That’s why driving and texting has become such a problem. The Kentucky Office of Highway Safety states that cellphone use while driving has caused 186 crashes so far this year.  

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