WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Rick Pender 07.18.2014 4 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
route 66 - commonwealth theatre company - photo tyler gabbard

Stage Door: Kentucky's the Place for Theater this Weekend

The Commonwealth Theatre Company's production of Route 66 continues its dinner-theater run at Northern Kentucky University. It's about a band traveling from Chicago to the West Coast in the 1960s along one of America's most legendary highways. Along the way, they meet a lot of colorful characters and see a lot of America. Wes Carman, Roderick Justice, Dain Alan Paige and Joshua Steele make up "The Chicago Avenue Band," who make stops at juke joints, diners, cheap motels and curio shops in this coming of age story. Through July 27. Dinner and the show ($30): 859-572-5464.Last Saturday evening I ended up at Highlands High School in Fort Thomas to see teacher Jason Burgess's production of The Addams Family featuring a herd of high school kids from all over Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. It's a perfect musical for the program Burgess has created (C.A.S.T, the Commonwealth Artists Summer Theatre), bringing together a ton of students who are in love with theater. Surrounding the central characters in The Addams Family, nicely portrayed by Aaron Schilling as Gomez, Lindsey Gwen Franxman as Morticia and Harrison Swayne as Uncle Fester, are 18 ghostly "ancestors." Each one is costumed (designer Laura Martin) from various periods with a clearly evident character; together they sing and dance as a coherent company. (Amy Burgess served as the production's choreographer, and Alex Gartner is the music director — in creepy makeup.) Through Sunday at 2 p.m. General admission ($10) at the door or online via www.showtix4u.com.Monday evening at 8 p.m. brings the third installment of Serials! at Know Theatre (1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine). It's a wacky summer-long set of a half-dozen episodic plays by local playwrights. So far we have seen meat falling from the sky, an NSA spook monitoring a contentious couple, a kid refusing to go to a funeral, a philosophical fetus, a suicidal pair competing over techniques and more. Each 10-15 minute episode is preceded by a clever recap to catch you up, even if it's your first time there. Rest assured there are cliffhangers — not to mention Know's well-stocked Underground Bar. Admission is $15. Tickets: 513-300-5669.
 
 
by Rick Pender 06.20.2014 32 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 10:14 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage

Stage Door: Keep the Groove Going

Probably the most entertaining thing onstage right now is Private Lives at Cincinnati Shakespeare. It's been selling so well that 2 p.m. matinee performances have been added this Saturday and June 28. (It closes on June 29.) It's the story of honeymoons going bad when a feisty divorced couple decide to reunite rather than stick with their new spouses — when they find themselves coincidentally in adjacent hotel rooms in Southern France. (CityBeat review here.) Cleverly staged by Ensemble Theatre's Lynn Meyers, using four of Cincy Shakes best actors. Of course it's all improbable and overdone, but that's a Noël Coward play for you — witty, silly and lots of fun. Tickets ($22-$31): 513-381-2273. You'll find laughs elsewhere with the Covedale Center's just-opened production of The Sunshine Boys by Neil Simon, a master of comedy. It's about a pair of vaudeville partners who spent 40 years working together and ended up not speaking. But they're being coaxed to come together to re-stage one of their old routines for a TV special. Rehearsals don't go well and the actual live broadcast spirals down from there. Simon is a master of one-liners, and this show has a million of them. Tickets ($21-$24): 513-241-6550. If Monday leaves you still looking for something onstage, Know Theatre is ready to open its doors for something entertaining: Serials! All summer long at two-week intervals (starting Monday) there will be 15-minute episodes of plays by local writers. This week you'll get to see pilots of Mars vs. The Atom by Trey Tatum, Flesh Descending by Chris Wesselman, The Funeral by Jon Kovach, The Listener by Mike Hall and Fetus and the God by Ben Dudley. These stories are open-ended and audience response will be a factor in where they go. If some of those names sound familiar, it's because most of them are veterans of the Cincy Fringe. If you had a good time there earlier this month, here's a way to keep your groove going. Tickets ($15): 513-300-5669.
 
 
by Rick Pender 04.25.2014 88 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 4-25 - venus in fur @ cincinnati playhouse - greta wohlrabe & pj sosko - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Options Abound

There's ample evidence at the Cincinnati Playhouse as to why David Ives' Tony-nominated play Venus in Fur is the most produced script in America this season. I saw the opening performance last evening, and it's an entertaining attention-grabber. Inspired by an erotic Victorian novel, it's the story of a playwright who's adapted it for the stage but despairing of finding the right actress — until Vanda appears. Despite the initial impression she makes, she proves to be almost too good to be true. Greta Wohlrabe is a marvel in this role, flipping between being an ambitious, over-enthused wannabe and a commanding, demanding, sophisticated paramour who knows the character she wants to play and how to get what she wants. It's sexy and funny — and a great evening for grown-ups. Through May 17. Tickets ($30-$75): 513-421-3888. Want to try something new this weekend? A new theater company, Women in Theatre (WIT) is staging Joe Calarco's Walter Cronkite Is Dead at St. John United Church of Christ in Bellevue, Ky. Two women stuck in an airport together end up sharing a table: One, from Washington, D.C., is reserved and educated, yearning for peace and quiet; the other is a chatty Southerner who can't stop talking. Their conversation, according to the show's publicity, is "funny, difficult, deeply revealing and astonishingly frank." Through May 3. Tickets: 859-441-6882. Stacy Sims, my CityBeat colleague, thought that New Edgecliff Theatre's production of Other People's Money was pretty good. (CityBeat review here.) Jerry Sterner's 1989 play remains timely, the story of a rapacious business guy who stands to destroy a small town when he buys a company that is pretty much the sole livelihood of the residents of a small Rhode Island town. Stacy called the show "good entertainment" and added, "it just might provoke you to consider whom you are listening to today." It's onstage at the Aronoff's Fifth Third Bank Theater through Saturday evening.  Stacy liked Know Theatre's production of The Twentieth-Century Way enough to give it a Critic's Pick in her CityBeat review here. It's two actors playing two actors in 1914 who are hired to play gay men in Long Beach and entrap "social vagrants" — that is, gay men. It's a multi-leveled script, playing with concepts of what's real and what's "enacted." Heady but fascinating, and it features two excellent actors, Jens Rasmussen and Michael McKeough. You won't be bored if you go to see this one. Through May 3. Tickets ($15 in advance; $20 at the door): 513-300-5669. Two productions that will appeal to audiences who like old-fashioned theater remain onstage. With its final performance on Sunday, Mary Chase's gentle comedy, Harvey, at the Carnegie in Covington, is about Elwood, a guy who's a little off-kilter — who sees a six-foot-tall white rabbit that no one else believes is real (except the audience). Tickets ($17-$24); 859-957-1940. The classic musical Gypsy — full of great show tunes — continues at the Covedale through May 4; it's about Rose, the pushy stage mother who launched her rather unwilling daughter into a burlesque career as Gypsy Rose Lee. (CityBeat review here.) Tickets ($21-$24): 513-241-6550.
 
 
by Rick Pender 04.11.2014 102 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door

Stage Door: Green Day and More

If you follow music coverage in CityBeat (hey, isn't that really why you pick up the paper?), you're certainly aware of Green Day's 2004 recording American Idiot. But since you're reading my weekend theater previews, you must be interested in other kinds of performance, so here's a tip: For two nights only, Green Day's American Idiot, a stage version of the powerful Punk score, will be onstage at the Aronoff. That's right — Friday and Saturday only, just three performances, much shorter that Broadway in Cincinnati's two-week presentation of touring Broadway musicals. I can vouch for this one, since I saw it a year ago during a similar tour stop in Dayton. It's the story of three disaffected guys who take different downward spirals when confronted with the numbing boredom of everyday life — "alien nation" — as they sing in the opening number. The recording was conceived as a "Punk Rock Opera" and turned into a Tony Award-nominated Broadway show in 2010, with a lot of involvement by Green Day's lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong (who actually appeared onstage in New York at various performances; that's not happening here in Cincinnati). There's a day-of-performance lottery for a limited number of $25 tickets; you need to show up two-and-a-half hours before the performance you're hoping to see (8 p.m. Friday, and 5 and 8 p.m. on Saturday) with a valid photo ID. Complete an entry form and wait 30 minutes to find out if you're a winner. If you prefer to just go ahead and buy your seats ($38-$91), you can call the Aronoff box office: 513-621-2787. In the classic musical Gypsy, Rose has very concrete ideas regarding how to turn her daughters into stars (long before Green Day was punking out, to be sure): Back in the 1920s and ’30s she pushed her kids onto vaudeville stages whether they liked it or not. Things never went quite as she imagined, which was really a desire for her own fame and stardom. It's one of the great musicals, and the role of Rose has been compared to King Lear. That might be a bit of a stretch, but she's a tragic character who's fascinating to watch. There's a ton of great music, composed by Jule Styne with lyrics by a very young Stephen Sondheim and lots of humor along the way, especially the hilarious number by three strippers, "You Gotta Get a Gimmick." Cincinnati Landmark opened its production Thursday night, and it will be onstage at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts through May 4. Tickets ($21-$24): 513-241-6550. Mary Chase's comedy Harvey won the 1945 Pulitzer Prize and had a four-year Broadway run (1,800 performances). The story of Elwood P. Dowd and his invisible friend, a 6-foot tall rabbit named Harvey, is perhaps best known for the 1950 movie featuring Jimmy Stewart in an Oscar-nominated performance. That's all well and good, but it's a show that audiences love to see live and in-person, and you can do just that at Covington's Carnegie for the next three weekends (tonight through April 27). It's directed by Buz Davis, who produced shows at the Carnegie when it was a dilapidated wreck back in the ’80s and ’90s. Now he's returning to stage Harvey in the beautifully renovated Otto M. Budig Theatre. (Tickets ($17-$24): 859-957-1940.) Davis has assembled a strong cast for this family-friendly comedy, you can catch a few of them in this charming promotional video:Still onstage are several recommended productions: The Mountaintop at Ensemble Theatre (final extended performance is Saturday evening; 513-421-3555); A Delicate Ship at the Cincinnati Playhouse (through April 20; 513-421-3888; CityBeat review here); and The Twentieth-Century Way at Know Theatre (through May 3; CityBeat review here.) And if Monday comes and you want still more: Check out True Theatre's next installment — True Dating (7:30 p.m. at Know Theatre). This round of monologues of real experiences will feature stories of dating that led to true love, and some that went off the tracks along the way. Tickets ($15): 513-300-5669.
 
 
by Rick Pender 02.13.2014
Posted In: Theater at 09:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
andrew hungerford - know theatre

Know Introduces New Artistic Director

Andrew Hungerford announces four coming productions

Know Theatre formally introduced its incoming artistic director, Andrew Hungerford, before a full house on Wednesday evening. He might not approach the boundless energy of his predecessor Eric Vosmeier (more on his half-dozen years at the helm here), but Hungerford has a kind of boyish enthusiasm for the job he's taking on that feels fresh and infectious. The crowd of supporters seemed enthusiastic about his engagement and were especially pleased as he filled in details about coming productions for the months ahead in 2014. Calling Know's 17th season "Adaptation," he stressed that shows he's selected are adaptations of literary works, of different genres for the stage, of people struggling with changing circumstances and — by the way — of a theater company adapting to a new artistic director. He announced four shows. The Twentieth-Century Way by Tom Jacobson (April). Two actors play more than a dozen roles to recreate the true story of how, in 1914, police in Long Beach, Calif., hired two actors to entrap gay men in the crime of "social vagrancy."  Know Serials (Summer). Inspired by episodic TV series, Know will present 15-minute slices of six "series" every other week, commencing during the Fringe (in early June) and proceeding through the summer. This promises to be a playground for local artists to connect with audiences returning for more during the summer months on Know's Underground stage, with the bar nearby — and popcorn promised.  Harry and the Thief by Sigrid Gilmer (August). The story of a guy with a time machine and a plan to go back to the Civil War era, find abolitionist Harriet Tubman and give her guns. Hungerford describes this play "a socially conscious riot of a play that uses a form of a Michael Bay action movie to tell a story full of adventure, social relevance, and answering the call of destiny."  Moby Dick (October). This one was previously announced, a stage version of Herman Melville's immense 19th-century American novel about an obsessive sea captain and a "great white whale." Hungerford will co-direct Julian Rad's script with "local theatrical rabble-rouser" Michael Burnham (recently retired from the drama faculty at CCM). The production mixes sea shanties and inventive physicality with a text that explores issues of youth, friendship, duty and how far a man like Captain Ahab will go. It's an intriguing lineup, one that seems likely to keep audiences returning for doses of Know's brand of off-kilter but engaging theater.
 
 

Pluto (Review)

Crossing Wires Between Reality and Fantasy: Pluto

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 29, 2014
Know Theatre is presently staging Steve Yockey’s new play Pluto, the second of four “rolling world premieres.” The work is not easy to describe, to watch or to like. That’s not to say it’s not worth seeing — but it’s challenging.  

Local Stages Kept Things Interesting in 2013

0 Comments · Monday, December 23, 2013
How was 2013 as a year for plays and musicals in Cincinnati? From where I stand — or sit, since I’m most often in a seat at one of our local theaters — it stacked up pretty well.  
by Mike Breen 11.21.2013
Posted In: Local Music, Music News at 04:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cincymusic_photo_showcase_website_size

Concert Photography Celebrated at Know

CincyMusic.com hosts a happy hour party featuring locally-shot live music photography

Tomorrow (Friday) at Over-the-Rhine’s Know Theatre of Cincinnati, a special photography collection will be on the display, showcasing some of the best work of local photographers who especially shine when shooting live music events.    In the spirit of the Reverberation: Capturing the Live Music Experience exhibit presented by FofoFocus at the Art Academy of Cincinnati this past September leading up to the MidPoint Music Festival, the photographers whose work is published at the great local music site CincyMusic.com have put together a collection of some of their favorite shots. The photos — by Jacob Drabik, Brian Bruemmer, Kelly Painter, Phil Dawson, Julia Huber, Matt Steffen, Mike Clare and Sarah McDermott — were all taken at club shows, festivals and concerts in the Cincinnati area (including ones from MidPoint and the Bunbury Music Festival).  CincyMusic.com hosts tomorrow's free event at Know, which kicks off at 5:30 p.m. and runs until 8 p.m. There will be light appetizers and the venue’s lower-level bar will be open for business. And if you're up for a little theatre afterwards, tickets are still available for Know's 8 p.m. staging of Bull, a play about adult bullying (timely!). Rick Pender reviewed Bull in CityBeat earlier this month, writing, "You won’t like anyone you see onstage in this savage tale. You’ll probably question your own enjoyment of the show’s dark humor and vicious actions. But the acting and staging of Bull make this a riveting piece of theater." Get tickets here or at the theatre if any remain.
 
 

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