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Who’s on Board?

Upcoming Dennison Hotel demolition vote highlights the importance of city board appointments

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 18, 2016
The contested fate of a historic building downtown is in the hands of an appointed seven-member board — and that makes preservationists nervous.    

No Streetcar Budget Just Yet

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 20, 2016
Just six months before the streetcar is scheduled to start gliding passengers around downtown and Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati City Council almost passed the transit project’s first-year operating budget April 13.  
by Danny Cross 04.19.2016 36 days ago
at 07:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cranley

Morning News & Stuff

Cranley + NAACP or Cranley vs. NAACP?, Dennison vote on hold, new crime lab plan moves ahead

Mayor John Cranley yesterday offered his support for involving the local NAACP in ongoing talks between the University of Cincinnati Police Department and Cincinnati Police Department, but it wasn't necessarily the do-gooder tale it might seem. At least that's how the NAACP sees it.UCPD has been mired in issues since the shooting death of unarmed black motorist Samuel DuBose by UCPD officer Ray Tensing last year, including revelations that its former chief encouraged officers to increase enforcement within a "no-fly zone" and then mislead investigators after the shooting. Stops increased by 400 percent during the year leading up to the July 19 shooting of DuBose. Rather than graciously accepting the invitation, however, Cincinnati NAACP President Rob Richardson, Sr. questioned the mayor’s motives, The Enquirer reported yesterday. Richardson, Sr.’s son, Rob Richardson, Jr., is the UC Board of Trustees chairman who some believe could be mulling a mayoral run next year.Richardson, Sr. says he hasn’t heard from the mayor about many other issues and suggested that Cranley could be playing politics.In true Cranley fashion, the mayor said that surely is not the case, then offered a well-crafted sound bite that kind of sounds otherwise:"If the NAACP doesn't think this is important enough to be involved, then that speaks volumes given that his son is the chairman of the UC board," Cranley said. "If the NAACP doesn't want to be involved, that's fine. We can ask the Cincinnati Black United Front and local National Action Network, and the invitation is always open for the NAACP."• In other clearly non-politically related news, the Historic Conservation Board yesterday rescheduled the vote on whether or not the Joseph Auto Group family will be allowed to demolish the historic Dennison Hotel building on Main Street.  Joseph’s attorneys had asked for more time to respond to a report issued by Cincinnati Urban Conservator Beth Johnson, who was highly skeptical of their demolition application. That doesn’t mean Johnson can single-handedly stop it, however. The conservation board is comprised of seven members, five of whom were recent appointments made on Mayor John Cranley's watch. Among those appointments, made by City Manager Harry Black, is developer Shree Kulkarni. The developer in the past has butted heads with the very board on which he now sits — because, as we noted in Morning News yesterday, he wanted to tear down historic buildings on Fifth Street to build a parking lot. The vote has been rescheduled for May 26.• Meanwhile, The Enquirer has the details of infighting among the Joseph family itself. Sixty-four-year-old Marie Joseph has sued big brother and Joseph Auto Group CEO Ron Joseph, accusing him of cutting his siblings out while consolidating the company’s holdings. Apparently, this is not the first time these two Josephs have fought it out in court. The Enquirer detailed a few other rich people problems plaguing the siblings in this paragraph: “Pineridge LLC, an entity controlled by Ron Joseph and his wife Marcia, filed a lawsuit in Hamilton County Municipal Court last year to evict Marie Joseph and her son Derek from a Mount Lookout home it planned to sell. The lawsuit claimed she'd rebuffed requests to leave since summer 2014. The home is located one block from where Ron and Marcia Joseph live.” You can read more about all of this here. • Hamilton County could finally be on track to update its outdated crime lab. County Commissioners yesterday accepted a proposal to build a new facility, which could cost around $40 million. Attempts to get a plan approved that would have renovated a former hospital in Mount Airy fell through. Coroner Lackshmi Sammarco has long advocated for a new facility, as the department currently works in a 40-year-old building in need of major upgrades, which she says inhibits productivity. The coroner’s office tests all of the county’s DNA, drug, ballistics and other forensic cases, as well as similar services for more than a dozen other municipalities. • The Banks has some new tenants lined up, including a luxury bowling alley and live music venue. • The Supreme Court seems to be divided on President Obama’s executive action on immigration, which would temporarily grant quasi-legal status to undocumented immigrants whose children were born in the U.S. Around 4 million people could be shielded from deportation if it is upheld. The court could end up split 4-4, however, which would uphold a lower court’s decision that has kept the actions from going into effect. Doubt this sort of thing has anything to do with why Republicans refuse to allow a confirmation hearing for Obama’s Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland no matter how bad it makes them look. • The sponsor of a controversial Tennessee transgender bill has pulled it until at least next year. Advocates from both sides are geared up for a fight over the legislation, which would require students to use the bathroom that corresponds to their gender at birth. Perhaps the decision to table it for now might have something to do with the $1.3 billion in Title IX funding the state’s attorney general says could be in jeopardy if it passes. • Also in Tennessee, family movie night at the Tennessee Titans football stadium got a lot more fun when the field’s sprinkler system came on. • Also in bathroom news, hand dryers are apparently spraying viruses up into the air, though manufacturers note that this wouldn’t happen if people would wash their hands correctly before drying them with their space-age technology. • This guy wants to know why society spends tax money on things that not everyone uses. In this case, he’s mad about the $4.2 million a year the city will pay to operate the streetcar, but probably not upset about things like this.
 
 

Council Could Up City Worker Minimum Wage to $15

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 6, 2016
City of Cincinnati employees like health worker Sheila Nash of Price Hill could get a bump in pay if Cincinnati City Council approves a series of ordinances designed to boost wages, increase worker safety and incentivize city contractors to pay employees more.  

Worst Week Ever! March 30 - April 05

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Pollution of America's waterways temporarily produces artificial beauty; Cowboys owner/noted medical genius sees no link between NFL and brain disease; God isn't the only sky creature who has no love for most of the human race and more.   

Stuck in Park

Policy debates over parking permits leave OTR residents caught in the middle

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 27, 2016
That struggle carries a number of consequences for OTR residents, advocates say, influencing decisions about grocery shopping, childcare, work and even whether long-time community members feel welcome in or are able to stay in the neighborhood.   

Debate Over Property Tax Rollback Rolls On

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 13, 2016
Mayor John Cranley last week vetoed a tax budget passed by Cincinnati City Council Jan. 6, touching off an argument about a unique Cincinnati property tax practice.  

Worst Week Ever! Jan. 13-19

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 13, 2016
Maine governor debuts plan to combat heroin epidemic with old-fashioned racism; record Powerball jackpot is chance to become God, despite what haters say about odds; streetcar hours pique interest of argumentative Cincinnatians and more.   
by Nick Swartsell 01.08.2016 138 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
yvette simpson

Morning News and Stuff

Could Simpson oppose Cranley in 2017?; Griffey will wear Mariners cap in HOF plaque; economy grows, wages do not

Good morning all. Here’s your news for this morning.First, let's go to something we’ve been talking about here at CityBeat HQ for a little bit now: Who might oppose Mayor John Cranley in 2017? One of the top names on a lot of people's lips (and someone we’ve speculated might launch a campaign) over the past few months has been Democrat Cincinnati City Councilwoman Yvette Simpson. This is kind of a non-news story, but Simpson has said she hasn’t ruled out that possibility. She gave the standard “I’m still focused on my current job” answer when asked by The Cincinnati Enquirer about the possibility but also said she would consider running against her fellow Democrat. Simpson and Cranley have vastly different styles and, at times, very different policy ideas. The two have butted heads often in Council, including over provisions for human services funding in the city’s budget process and former Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell’s firing last year.• It’s official: The Hamilton County GOP has tapped Dennis Deters to fill the Hamilton County Commission seat vacated by outgoing commission head Greg Hartmann. The move has been widely expected since Deters, brother to Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters, filed to run for that slot in the 2016 election. The county GOP named Deters as a temporary fill-in after Hartmann abruptly announced he would not seek reelection and then that he would step down early. The temporary gig gives Deters a better chance at landing the full-time job: He’ll have almost a year of incumbency when he faces off against Democrat State Rep. Denise Driehaus, who looks to be a formidable opponent.• Well, how do you like that? This is the third day in a row I’ve written a blurb about Ken Griffey, Jr., who will be wearing a Seattle Mariners hat in his Hall of Fame plaque. Yes, yes, he spent more of his professional years there, I guess. And scored way more home runs and by every other statistic had his best years there. But come on. Dude went to high school in Cincinnati and played for years with the Reds — as did his dad Ken Griffey, Sr. The Griffey name is a Cincinnati name. Wait, his dad played for the Mariners, too? Ugh. Fine. Take him, Seattle. We have a bunch of Hall of Famers of our own, and we invented professional baseball anyway.• So, extending the theme of surprisingly famous Cincinnatians I’ve drawn out over the past few days, let’s get one more in there before the weekend. Did you know that a Cincy attorney made the cover of the New York Times Magazine recently? And that Rob Bilot, who works for a law firm usually tasked with defending big corporations, is on that cover for aggressively pursuing one of the world’s largest, DuPont, over environmental damage its caused in West Virginia? The story is a very good read and worth a look. • Here’s something kind of unusual: the Ohio Republican Party has voted to endorse Gov. John Kasich’s bid in the GOP presidential primary. That may seem like a no-brainer — Kasich is governor of the state, after all, and one of the state party’s most powerful members — but state-level parties usually stay neutral in primaries so they can support party voters’ choice of candidate better in the general election. Party officials say they’ve made the move because Kasich is popular in the state and has a strong conservative record. The nod could be a big boost for Kasich: Republicans desperately need Ohio to win the presidential election.• Finally, this is the same story nearly every month, but here it is again: the U.S. economy added nearly 300,000 jobs in December. Things are going pretty well, employment level-wise, unless you’re a miner, in which case things are probably not going so well on a number of levels. Mining jobs were one of the few categories that saw losses. But it’s not all good news. Like past positive job gains, this one comes with the caveat that wages remain flat for U.S. workers. There were zero wage gains in the month of December, and pay for employees across the country rose just 2.5 percent in 2015 overall. Annnnd I’m out. E-mail or tweet me story tips or the best gear/tricks for cold-weather bicycling. Also, give me a shout if you have thoughts about the Netflix docu-drama Making a Murderer. I have so many half-baked thoughts about that show.
 
 

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