WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Art About Town

Focusing on 2012's visual arts highlights

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 26, 2012
This may seem a strange way to start a review of the year in Cincinnati’s visual arts, but the piece that stays with me the most — haunts me, really — doesn’t even fit any traditional definition of art.  
by Steven Rosen 12.12.2012
at 10:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
krisrucinski2

A Star is Born at CCM

After previewing for CityBeat the recent American Voices XIV: Celebrating John Cage at 100 concert at UC’s College-Conservatory of Music, I attended the crowded event to see the group I had featured, Percussion Group Cincinnati, perform Cage’s Music for Three while the CCM Philharmonia played Cage’s Ranga. It was as charming and strange, as enigmatically mysterious, as one expects of Cage.But what was completely unexpected — and absolutely, breathtakingly, thrilling — was the performance before that, CCM student Kris Rucinski’s mastery of the four movements of Lou Harrison’s Piano Concerto. Harrison, who died in 2003, had written the concerto in the 1980s for Keith Jarrett. The online Arts Journal has called this sweeping, complex and majestic half-hour piece “as formidable as any ever composed by an American.” And with good reason — its fiery passages erupt and tumble like lava; its quieter and more reflective moments are transcendent.It would seem a piece for a mature virtuoso, yet Rucinski showed stunning, sustained accomplishment, at peak fast-paced moments striking and pounding the keys, hand over hand, like Cecil Taylor. At others, he was as confidently elegant as any seasoned classical soloist.Pursuing a Master’s in Piano Performance, Rucinski already has several videos on You Tube. He’s a phenomenal talent, someone I suspect could some day become of CCM’s many most illustrious students. Maybe very soon.
 
 

Cage Re-Engaged

Special John Cage Centennial concert features past collaborators

1 Comment · Wednesday, November 28, 2012
John Cage fearlessly explored how any sound could make for beautiful “music.” This included silence — Cage’s most famous composition, “4.33,” connotes the duration of minutes and seconds during which an orchestra or musician makes no sounds.   

Carl Solway Celebrates John Cage Centennial

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 24, 2012
Carl Solway, celebrating his 50th year as a Cincinnati gallerist, was speaking recently to arts patrons in the residence at Hamilton’s Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park about the milestone that is his new show. He’s presenting a John Cage show, he said, because Cage was the 20th Century’s greatest artist.    

Silent Night, Anti-Semitism and Just Plain Racist?

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 6, 2010
Those prankster Brits are scheming to “fix” the No. 1 UK single at Christmastime once again. Last year, an online campaign allowed Rage Against the Machine’s 1992 track “Killing in the Name” to win. This year's John Cage's "4'33'" is in the running. The song is 4 minutes and 33 seconds of silence.  

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