WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

You Can’t Always Get What You Want

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Hillary Clinton is suffering so acutely from the Clinton Dynasty Syndrome she cannot see straight enough to come within the ZIP code of the right thing.  
by Nick Swartsell 02.04.2015 53 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
p.g. sittenfeld.nar

Morning News and Stuff

Answers in Genesis could sue Kentucky over ark park; Polls mixed for Kasich prez run; the 21-mile walk to work

What’s up, all? That’s a rhetorical question. News is what’s up, and here it is.Answers in Genesis, the Christian organization based in Northern Kentucky that is building a Noah’s Ark theme park in Grant County, has said it will sue the state of Kentucky over tax credits the state rescinded in December. The state took back the tourism-related credits after controversy over Answers’ hiring practices, which stipulate potential employees must sign a statement of faith and other religious measures. Those violate employment discrimination laws and preclude Answers from getting taxpayer money, state officials say. Answers, on the other hand, says they have a right to require their employees fit with their religious values. They’re suing Kentucky for infringing on their religious liberty. The group also says that because the tax credits are sales tax rebates that originally come from the pockets of visitors, they don’t involve taxpayers from the state as a whole. The group has released a video outlining their side of the debate, which you can watch here. Warning: It’s like, almost half an hour long and is mostly a dude in an ill-fitting blazer talking to a lawyer while both sit in folding chairs. The group looks to build a 500-foot long ark and surrounding theme park, which it says will attract more than a million visitors a year.• Here’s your morning dose of creepy: Hamilton County lawyers would like to limit testimony about the sexual behavior of Kenneth Douglas, a former county morgue employee who is accused of sexually abusing more than 100 corpses at the morgue from the 1970s to the 1990s. Currently, a federal district court is hearing the case against the county brought by the families of three of the deceased whose bodies were abused. The families say the county was negligent in allowing the abuse to happen. The county is attempting to block some testimony about other instances of abuse, including information Douglas gave to law enforcement about the number of bodies he abused. The county’s lawyers say testimony beyond the three abuse cases in question could be confusing and misleading for the jury. The families suing the county for millions say the other incidents show a clear pattern of behavior Douglas’ supervisors should have known about.• Cincinnati City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld has introduced an initiative to expand the city’s vacant properties registry. Currently, that registry keeps track of bank-owned properties that are currently empty and makes sure the banks aren’t letting them fall into disrepair. But there are loopholes in the system that Sittenfeld would like to close so the city can better hold property owners holding onto vacant buildings accountable. He’d also like to use some of the revenues from the program, which amounted to about $700,000 last year, for hazard abatement and stabilization work. • Here’s more buzz, and some lack thereof, about a potential presidential bid for Ohio Gov. John Kasich. A recent Quinnipiac University poll found Kasich nearly even with prospective Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in Ohio. Hillary took 44 percent of the poll. Kasich took 43 percent. The quintessential swing state, Ohio is shaping up to be very important for presidential hopefuls in 2016, as it has been in past elections. But how much of the above poll’s results are home field advantage, and how much does the poll say about Kasich’s primary chances? A lot and not much, it would seem. Another poll of GOPers in the state had Kasich with a lead over fellow Republicans, but not by much. Kasich led with 14 percent of the poll, followed by Scott Walker, who had 11 percent and Jeb Bush and Sen. Rand Paul, who each had 10 percent. That lead isn’t much to go on at this point, but it’s still quite early and Kasich could consolidate some of other potential nominees’ support as the herd thins. More troubling for Kasich, however, is the fact that in other Quinnipiac polls around the country, he barely makes a blip. He finished 13th out of 13 candidates in Florida, for example, and tied for 9th in Pennsylvania, his native state. In contrast with other potential nominees in his party who have national stature for one reason or another — Jeb Bush, Rand Paul, Rick Perry, Ted Cruz — Kasich will need to significantly expand his visibility in the coming year if he hopes to compete for his party’s nomination. • Finally, you may have already seen this story about the Detroit dude who walks 21 miles a day to get to work. I think his situation is infuriating and sad but find his attitude inspiring. As a fellow pedestrian commuter (note: my walk is only about a mile and a half, I make it by choice, and only on days when it’s too cold to ride a bike) I think James Robertson is something of a hero. I think the issues raised by Robertson's daily trek are especially pertinent in Cincinnati; a city with a serious love of cars and a hardworking but less-than-ideal transit system. I couldn't help thinking about folks who have appeared in some of our recent stories about the working poor when I read this. Seriously, check this story out if you haven’t already.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 01.29.2015 59 days ago
Posted In: News at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sherrod brown

Why Not Sherrod Brown for Prez?

Staunch progressive seems a logical choice for Dem nominee but says he's not interested

If you’re a spectator of Democratic Party politics right about now, you’ve probably watched the 2016 presidential election sweepstakes unfolding with interest. Dems probably won’t get close to the huge stable of potential nominees the Republican Party is currently wrangling with, and Hillary Clinton seems to have the nomination locked up, so much so that she's not even started her campaign yet. But there are other viable candidates. Vice President Joe Biden is also, uh, bidin’ his time (sorry). And then there’s progressive firebrand Elizabeth Warren. She says she’s not running, but she’s got a vocal fan base who have continued to push her name into the conversation in a big way. One question you may have asked yourself at this point: If Warren, why not Sen. Sherrod Brown? Or maybe, if you’re like some of the prominent progressive political operatives in this Washington Post story, that possibility hasn’t entered your mind. But as that story asks, why not?Ohio’s senior senator has the deep progressive bonafides of Warren plus a heap more experience, an easy-going way about him and a high profile in the nation’s highest deliberative body. Plus, if we haven’t already said this (we have), Ohio’s so hot right now. Our other senator, Rob Portman, had been considered a potential candidate for the Republican nomination before he dropped out in December. Fellow GOPer Gov. John Kasich’s name has been floated a lot as well, though he’s been coy about his intentions. And there’s a good possibility all three political conventions will be converging on our vital swing state in 2016. A presidential candidate from Ohio could wrap the state up for either party. So why not Brown? Is it the perception that Democrats are ready to elect the first female president after Barack Obama's history-making election? Is it Brown’s own reluctance, or outright refusal, actually, to play along? Is it the fact that he sounds like the Dark Knight when he talks? (The Post says Tom Waits. I consider either an asset.) Brown says he's focused on doing the job he has now, but they all say that, right?“I don’t think you can do your job well in the Senate if you’re looking over your shoulder wanting to be president,” Brown tells the Post. Earlier in the article, he says, “I know you don’t believe this, but I don’t really think about it all that much.”
 
 

The Backstabbers

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 12, 2014
President Obama now appears as a pariah, a lone wolf.  
by Nick Swartsell 10.30.2014
Posted In: News at 10:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

Council passes a bunch of stuff; Sheriff Jones' not-so-excellent adventure; Grimes hangs out with Hillary

All right! So I’ve got some great Halloween parties lined up and it’s really hard to sit still and focus on important things. But since that’s pretty much what being a grownup is about, and since they pay me to (kind of) be a grownup around here, let’s talk about news for a few.• Though most of the action happened in committee meetings, City Council made final a bunch of things it has been working on, including funding the mayor’s Hand Up initiative. The jobs program has been controversial since the funding will come in part from other programs. Get the back story on that here. Council also gave the thumbs up for City Manager Harry Black’s proposals for the city’s $18 million budget surplus. The city will stash most of it away in savings or emergency accounts for weather and such, give some to a new data analysis office, use some to fight infant mortality and to repay neighborhood programs.  Council also gave final approval to an ordinance that would make getting expungements easier for those convicted under Cincinnati’s old marijuana law. Lingering criminal records for a number of city residents mean difficulty finding jobs and getting school loans, something the new law looks to address.Finally, council passed new regulations on Uber and Lyft. You can read more about that here. Busy day. • A while back I told you about outspoken Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones taping an interview for The Daily Show. Well, this probably goes without saying, but… it didn’t go so well. It’s gotta be hard when you’re diametrically opposed to the viewpoints of the show you’re going on, and they have all the editing power, but still. It was rough. Jones, who made his way down to the belly of the liberal beast, Austin, Texas, for the taping, continually insisted that illegal immigrants get all sorts of free stuff the rest of us aren’t privy to. I’ll let you watch the results yourself if you haven’t already.• Also a while back, and also something you should watch — the Cleveland Plain Dealer editorial meeting at which Gov. John Kasich more or less ignored beleaguered challenger Ed FitzGerald. I also, because I’m thoughtful like that, linked you to a page with a video of the exchange, or, well, lack thereof. Only the Plain Dealer later took that video down, which is weird, right? So here it is again. Warning: strong language in the article accompanying the vid, including the terms "douchecanoe" and "asshat."• Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes is getting more help from the Clintons in her nail-biter of a challenge to Sen. Mitch McConnell. Hillary Clinton will appear with Grimes today in Louisville and Saturday in Covington at 11th-hour campaign rallies. No word what their Friday plans are, but I’m going to some great Halloween parties if y’all are reading and interested.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.16.2014
Posted In: News at 09:03 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

Greenpeace P&G protester dies; King James comes to Cincy; is Grimes done for?

Good morning Cincy! I’m a little groggy today after last night’s Iron Fork event, which was awesome. If you were at the Moerlein Taproom for the chef showdown and restaurant sampling festivities, you probably saw me with the group that pretty much monopolized the giant Jenga set all night. Sorry ‘bout that. Anyway, on with the news.One of the Greenpeace activists on trial for hanging an anti-palm oil banner from P&G headquarters has died, the Associated Press reports. Tyler David Wilkerson, 27, died Oct. 6, according to an obituary in the Fresno Bee newspaper. No cause of death or other details have been released. Wilkerson was one of eight activists facing felony burglary and vandalism charges in connection with the March protest. A ninth activist took a plea bargain. • Yesterday’s City Council meeting was action packed. Well, maybe not action packed, but interesting and eventful. OK, OK, just eventful, and with more bickering than usual for some reason. Members of council got their feathers all ruffled by the fact that the media knew about Cincinnati’s $18 million budget surplus before they did, perhaps marking the end of new City Manager Harry Black’s honeymoon with the city’s most illustrious deliberative body. Council members found it a bit off-putting that plans were already being made for that money before they even knew it existed. Black promised to make sure every council member is tipped off the next time the city finds unexpected change in the couch cushions.But look at me over here gossiping. Substantive stuff happened as well. • The city will pay $300,000 to help clean up a failed compost facility in Winton Hills affectionately nick-named “Big Stanky.” OK, no one but me calls it that. But it does smell very bad, and that’s caused a great deal of controversy. The company, Cincy Compost, went bust earlier this year, but left something like 80,000 tons of rotting meat and other food scraps behind. The city is chipping in on the cleanup because it has to be done, but Mayor Cranley and a few council members weren’t happy about it. Cranley used the issue as an opportunity to jab at the city’s Office of Environmental Quality and Sustainability, which he blamed for the mess. Other council members, including Chris Seelbach, jumped to defend the office, to which Cranley replied that the office’s “Meatfree Monday” initiative was dumb. Seemed like a bit of a low blow, since Seelbach is a vegetarian, but that’s neither here nor there.• Council also voted to apply for nine HUD grants worth more than $6 million for the city’s Continuum of Care program. The money would be used to provide rental assistance for homeless, low-income people with disabilities. Council also approved a $500,000 loan to Walnut Court Limited Partnership, a Walnut Hills developer. The developer will be rehabbing 30 units in the neighborhood to provide housing for very low income individuals. This deal was a bit more controversial, as Councilman Kevin Flynn questioned how the property, which was overseen by HUD, came to need such extensive renovations and why the city should have to pay for them.• Moving on to market rate developments, there are some new plans for the former site of the historic house that held Christy’s/Lenhardt’s restaurant and bar in Clifton Heights. The house was demolished last year to make way for an apartment building in the university neighborhood. Gilbane Development Co., which was part of initial plans to put a larger development at the site, has come back with some revised, scaled-down ideas. The building was originally going to be eight stories tall with 245 units of housing. It will now be only six stories with 190 units, as well as some commercial space. The project will be part of a larger development effort for the block that should happen sometime in 2015.• A little old, but worth noting: The Hamilton County Public Defenders Office has written a letter to Mayor John Cranley about Cincinnati Prosecutor Charlie Rubenstein, saying he took inappropriate actions last month by getting a judge to sign a warrant that would have allowed him to search the entire public defender’s office over a single robbery case. That just doesn’t happen to private law firms, the defender’s office says, and shouldn’t be allowed. The mayor and the city manager have said they want to work with the public defender’s office to make sure evidence is gathered in the least invasive way possible in the future.• LeBron James was in Cincinnati yesterday for a Cavs preseason game at Xavier University against the Indiana Pacers, and he said he liked the city, calling it “a great sports town.” Despite being arguably the state’s biggest name in sports, James had never played in Cincinnati before. He scored 26 points in the game.• Let’s take a quick jog south and revisit the Kentucky Senate race, shall we? Recent articles have prognosticated that time is almost up for Democrat Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes, who is challenging Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell for his seat. The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, the party’s national arm in the race, stopped spending money on ads in the state this week, leading reporters to say the party is pulling out of the race and that Grimes is ready for the fork, cause she’s done. That appears to have been a premature judgment, however. Potential Democrat presidential candidate Hillary Clinton campaigned for Grimes yesterday in Louisville, urging voters in the Bluegrass State to “put another crack in the glass ceiling” by putting Grimes into office. It also turns out that the DSCC is still running polls in Kentucky and may jump back into the race with more ads before all is said and done. Grimes' campaign also has about $4 million in that cash money in the bank, so don't count her out just yet.  Much has been made of Grimes’ refusal to say who she voted for in the last two presidential elections, and some pundits, including conservative commentator Rich Lowry, have said it has sunk Grimes’ chances in the race. Lowry wrote a deeply dumb rant ostensibly about that subject (though it quickly jumps the rails and becomes yet another boring anti-Obama diatribe about four paragraphs in). Clearly Democrats are still hoping Grimes has a chance, though.
 
 

No Images = No Stories

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 14, 2014
It’s taken almost a month for the story of hundreds of kidnapped Nigerian school girls to gain a foothold in the American news media.   

The Union

1 Comment · Wednesday, January 29, 2014
Just because Hillary Clinton is stalling her official announcement while her supporters scurry about amassing her campaign war chest does not mean the rest of us cannot see what is coming.   

In Defense of Julian Assange and WikiLeaks

2 Comments · Wednesday, December 1, 2010
WikiLeaks recently obtained more than 251,000 secret diplomatic messages from U.S. embassies worldwide. In what's been dubbed "the Sept. 11 of world diplomacy," the latest leaked documents show the candid, private and unflattering assessments of world leaders by U.S. officials and the pressure tactics they use behind-the-scenes to achieve their goals. Tea Party queen Sarah Palin says WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should be "pursued with the same urgency we pursue Al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders" and detained or assassinated.  

Jan. 20-26: Worst Week Ever!

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 27, 2010
It's bad enough to get a text message from your girlfriend when you know she's driving a car, but when your dad hits you with an ROFL while he's on the road driving a big rig, you know several things are wrong (ROFL). That's why the U.S. government today formally banned truckers and bus drivers from texting while behind the wheel.  

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