WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by German Lopez 09.09.2013
Posted In: News, LGBT at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
evolution of equality

Groups Come Together to Persuade Public on Gay Marriage

LGBT groups, civil libertarians and legislators involved in “big marriage push”

LGBT groups, civil libertarians and legislators are coming together in Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus today to announce Why Marriage Matters Ohio, a new statewide effort to educate and persuade Ohioans to support legalizing same-sex marriage. Evan Wolfson, founder and president of Freedom to Marry, explained the campaign’s purpose in a statement: “Why Marriage Matters Ohio aims to encourage neighbor-to-neighbor conversations across the state, inviting people to talk about their own individual journeys toward support of the freedom to marry and their values of respect for commitment and treating others as we’d all want to be treated. Personal stories are the best conversation starter — and conversation is the best way to help people understand that all loving and committed couples in Ohio, gay and non-gay alike, should be able to share in the freedom to marry and the security and meaning marriage brings.” The campaign involves the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, Equality Ohio, Freedom to Marry and the Human Rights Campaign. The efforts have been endorsed by faith and business community leaders, according to the groups. “Marriage is the ultimate recognition of loving relationships,” State Rep. Denise Driehaus, a Cincinnati Democrat, said in a statement. “It's time for Ohio to get down to business and start respecting all marriages.” In Cincinnati, Driehaus is announcing the campaign with Jim Obergefell, a Cincinnati resident who’s having his marriage recognized on his spouse’s death certificate as a result of a court order in favor of marriage equality. When issuing that court order, U.S. District Judge Timothy Black cited a U.S. Supreme Court ruling earlier in the year that deemed the federal government’s anti-gay marriage laws unconstitutional. Public officials and supporters are lining up in two other Ohio cities to support the campaign: U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown is speaking in Cleveland, and Elyzabeth Holford, executive director of Equality Ohio, is making the announcement in Columbus. According to a statement issued by the campaign, the effort is partly in response to recent public polling. The 2013 Ohio Values Survey from the Public Religion Research Institute found Ohioans evenly divided on same-sex marriage: 47 percent supported it and 47 opposed it. But 51 percent said they oppose amending the state constitution to legalize marriage equality. Still, the survey findings went against previous polls from The Washington Post and Quinnipiac University, which found a plurality of Ohioans now support allowing same-sex marriages in the state. Beyond allowing gay couples to share in the same rights as straight couples, same-sex marriages could also boost Ohio’s economic and job growth. A previous study from Bill LaFayette, founder of Regionomics, LLC, found that Ohio’s gross domestic product, which measures economic worth, would go up by $100-$126 million within three years of same-sex marriage legalization and sustain 740 to 930 jobs within the first year of legalization, 250 to 310 jobs within the second year and 170 to 210 jobs within the third year. The education push comes in time for a broader effort to legalize same-sex marriage. FreedomOhio originally planned to get the issue on the ballot this year, but it delayed the initiative for the 2014 ballot.
 
 
by Danny Cross 05.29.2012
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

The Ohio Supreme Court late last week dismissed a legal challenge by the Campaign to Protect Marriage, which had filed a motion challenging the attorney general’s authority to verify a proposed constitutional amendment that would allow same-sex marriage. The Freedom to Marry coalition is collecting the necessary signatures to put a repeal of the state’s 2004 amendment that only recognizes marriage as between a man and a woman on the ballot in 2013. City Councilman Wendell Young says there’s nothing secret about a plan to combine the region’s water and sewer agencies even though most people assumed to be needed for approval know little about it. The Enquirer today detailed a plan to integrate the Metropolitan Sewer District, Stormwater Management Utility and Greater Cincinnati Water Works, potentially by September, in an attempt to save money. The plan will reportedly be shared with Council June 20. Mitt Romney’s campaign plans to go after the stimulus, while Dems want to know why he won’t renounce questions about Obama’s citizenship (maybe because they came from Donald Trump?). Seems like the John Edwards trial is never going to end. Day seven of deliberations begins today. The U.S. could be one of the countries to benefit from the growth of natural gas use during the next 20 years, potentially reducing the importance of Middle East energy production. Common painkillers might help protect against skin cancer. Bring on the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers such as aspirin and ibuprofen! There was a face-chewing attack in Miami over the weekend. And the chewer was naked. Seriously. Google Chrome was the world’s top browser in May. Thought you knew. If commercial space flights are going to be basting up onto the moon, NASA says they’ll have to stay off the spots where historical things happened.
 
 

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