WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Seeing Double

I was Ewan McGregor’s stand-in, or how I spent my summer vacation

0 Comments · Friday, August 29, 2014
As Ewan McGregor’s stand-in, I was not an actor in Miles Ahead — Don Cheadle’s locally filmed Miles Davis film — but more of a celebrity-shaped prop used only when the camera was not rolling.   
by Jac Kern 07.08.2014 55 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Movies, Music, Humor at 03:34 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Move over, Vincent Chase! DC Comics’ Aquaman will come to life on the big screen in the form of Jason Momoa, aka Game of Thrones’ Khal Drogo, aka My Sun and Stars. Aquaman/Momoa was recently added to the cast of Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, joining Amy Adams (Lois Lane), Gal Gadot (Wonder Woman), Jesse Eisenberg (Lex Luthor) and, of course, Henry Cavill (Superman) and Ben Affleck (Batman) in the 2016 epic comic feature. Just for fun, here’s our pre-Thrones and Aquaman Momoa singing in a scene from his Baywatch days. What a voice! I had no idea Jason Momoa was the lead singer of the Crash Test Dummies.  Miles Ahead filming kicked off Monday. The most recent film to be shot locally stars Don Cheadle as Jazz legend Miles Davis and focuses on the musician’s five-year “silent period,” leading to his 1969 record In a Silent Way. Ewan McGregor and Michael Stuhlbarg (Boardwalk Empire) also star. Scenes will be filmed in dozens of local locations. Movie crews were seen today in Northside, while I caught Cheadle in a bright blue suit topped with Davis’ signature unkempt 'fro filming at Seventh and Elm streets Monday afternoon. Cheadle is making the film with the help of Indiegogo funding. Many of the donation prizes for the film have sold out, but there are still some perks left — for example, for $100 you can catch an advance screening of the film, where The Cheadz (that’s my nickname for him now that we’re basically friends) will be in attendance. He’ll also do a Q&A after the movie. Pretty cool I guess, but in “What are we doing with our lives?” crowdfunding news, this Columbus, Ohio-based potato salad Kickstarter currently has more than $53,000 in pledges. And it’s open for 24 more days. It’s original goal was $10. If you’re confused about how a crowdfunding site relates to picnic side dishes, this description from the project should help:I'm making potato salad. Basically I'm just making potato salad. I haven't decided what kind yet. It’s pretty hilarious until you realize the funds raised for this joke of a project could actually pay off your student and car loans and that no joke Kickstarter you could create will ever be as successful. So just give up already. So I know 2002 will soon be calling, asking for its pop culture references back, but this delicious parody/remix of Eminem's “Lose Yourself” via Gizmodo is winning the Internet right now. The headline Millennials have been waiting for is making its rounds on every news site and blog everywhere: Netflix Will Pay You to Watch Netflix. Harry Potter fans will be happy to know author J.K. Rowling has published a new story in the series on her site Pottermore. The new Potter tale catches up with the wizard and his pals in their adulthood. This is Rowling’s first Harry-centric piece since publishing the series’ final novel seven years ago. New movie trailers to hit the Interwebz: Jimi: All Is by My Side, starring André "3000" Benjamin as Mr. Hendrix; Before I Go To Sleep, with Nicole Kidman, Colin Firth and Mark Strong in what sounds like Memento meets 50 First Dates; and Horrible Bosses 2. Because Hollywood.
 
 

The Impossible

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 2, 2013
The story of a family, with Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts as the parents, that ends up separated during a tsunami. Their struggle to survive and reunite gets a thrillingly dramatic treatment in the hands of Spanish director Juan Antonio Bayona (The Orphanage).  

I Love You Phillip Morris (Review)

True-life con-man story humanizes its criminal protagonists

0 Comments · Wednesday, December 22, 2010
There's something terribly romantic about the bond that develops between Ewan McGregor's and Jim Carrey's gay lovers in a con-man story not far removed from a great film like 'Catch Me If You Can.' There's a sincerity in both movies than humanizes its criminal protagonists and celebrates their abilities to outwit the lawmen that tirelessly pursue them. Grade: A-.  

Nanny McPhee Returns (Review)

Sequel a vast improvement over the contrived first installment

0 Comments · Friday, August 20, 2010
A vast improvement over the 2005 franchise introduction of co-writer/actress Emma Thompson's Mary-Poppinsish household savior, Nanny McPhee Returns finds modern-day meaning in its World War II-era English trappings. Grade: B.  

The Ghost Writer (Review)

Polanski returns with flawed but entertaining thriller

0 Comments · Thursday, March 4, 2010
Co-written by Roman Polanski with political journalist Robert Harris, upon whose novel the film is based, 'The Ghost Writer' is full of plot holes yet still entices. Ewan McGregor plays an unnamed English writer who takes up a surprisingly dangerous job as a ghostwriter/autobiographer for Adam Lang (Pierce Brosnan), a former British prime minister accused of war crimes. Grade: B-.  

Men Who Stare at Goats (Review)

George Clooney satire too vague for its own good

0 Comments · Friday, November 6, 2009
Director Grant Heslov and screenwriter Peter Straughan adapt Jon Ronson's nonfiction book, turning Ronson into reporter Bob Wilton (Ewan McGregor), who heads to the Middle East in 2003 to cover the Iraq War. Instead, he finds Lyn Cassady (George Clooney), who was part of a 1980s military program launched by idealistic Vietnam veteran Bill Django (Jeff Bridges) to develop "Jedi Warriors" — soldiers with psychic abilities. Grade: C-plus.  

Angels & Demons (Review)

Everyone takes Dan Brown way too seriously again

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 13, 2009
Tom Hanks (sans his greasy 'Da Vinci Code' mullet) is back as Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, summoned by Vatican officials to help deal with a potential crisis. Though Dan Brown's 'Angels & Demons' book was written before 'Da Vinci,' a few knowing references here make it clear that the events in the movie post-date 'Da Vinci' and therefore the Church understands that Langdon knows his stuff. At its core, though, this is a movie about people racing around Rome trying to prevent an anti-matter explosion. Grade: C-.  

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