WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Rick Pender 05.23.2014 131 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage

Stage Door: Fringe and More

The really big show this weekend happens tonight when the The Cappies of Greater Cincinnati present their eighth annual awards for high school theater productions and performers. Our local program is one of the most established, right up there with programs in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and beyond. Our local awards are presented at the Aronoff Center's Procter & Gamble Hall. In addition to the recognition of high school student performers, the evening offers excerpts from a dozen or so schools plus ensemble numbers featuring kids from all over the region — more than 20 schools participate in the program. An especially exciting aspect (at least from my point of view as a critic) is the fact that an element of the Cappies involves students attending one another's performances and writing about them. Tonight will open with a recognition of the outstanding boy and girl critics, and wrap up by citing the top team of high school critics. I'll be onstage at the Aronoff to present that award, as well as something new: An award for the "top critique" by a student writer. I had the privilege of choosing the winner, which will be posted on CityBeat's arts blog after the award ceremony. And to show how profoundly CityBeat is committed to cultivating arts coverage, we're inviting that winner to cover a high school Fringe Next production in the Cincinnati Fringe Festival, which kicks off next week. No award for me, but I'm honored to be asked to hand out this recognition to the next generation of theater writers! Speaking of the Cincinnati Fringe Festival, I should remind you that it kicks off with a special party hosted by CityBeat on Tuesday. Performances begin on Wednesday evening (continuing through June 7). You can read my overview of the Fringe here touching on the many aspects of creativity, talent, emotion and flat-out fun that will be happening at venues throughout Over-the-Rhine and the northern edge of Downtown Cincinnati. For more information: www.cincyfringe.com. It's Memorial Day weekend, which is sort of the end of the local theater season, but there's still plenty to see. Size Matters, Ray McAnally's entertaining one-man show about his career as a "hefty" actor gets its final performance on Sunday (CityBeat review here; box office: 513-421-3555), and the Cincinnati Playhouse's taut drama The North Pool is still available on its Shelterhouse Stage (CityBeat review here; box office: 513-421-3888). One last tidbit: After many years of producing shows aboard the Showboat Majestic, Cincinnati Landmark Productions has pulled into port to stage its summer productions on dry land. They just opened a production of Jerry Herman's classic musical Hello, Dolly!, the kind of show that people have flocked to see on the 'Boat for decades. The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts is an interim stop: By next summer, CLP intends to steam into its new facility, The Warsaw Federal Incline Theater. If that name is unfamiliar, it's because it's just been announced. The savings and loan has been a West Side institution since 1893, and it's lending its venerable moniker to the brand-new 220-seat performing arts center, slated to break ground this summer. The fundraising effort seeking $5.6 million for the project is nearing completion. In the meantime, catch Hello, Dolly! between now and June 1. Tickets: 513-241-6550.
 
 

Size Matters (Review)

Ensemble production is thoughtful, funny and engaging

0 Comments · Monday, May 12, 2014
This simply staged, entertaining piece of theater will make you like a guy you might have otherwise dismissed.  
by Rick Pender 05.09.2014
Posted In: Theater at 08:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
the north pool @ cincinnati playhouse - eli gelb and ted deasy - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Thoughtful Performances

There are quite a few good options for theatergoing this weekend. First and foremost, I'd point to The North Pool at the Cincinnati Playhouse. It's a newish script from Rajiv Joseph (his play Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo was a runner up for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize), and it's a very timely piece, set in 2007 in a large public high school. Just two characters: a slightly disgruntled, tightly wound vice principal and a student of Middle Eastern descent who's been called in on the eve of spring break for a "conversation." What starts out as awkward but mildly amusing takes numerous twists and turns (the show is about 85 minutes long) and will keep you guessing as more and more is revealed. The teacher says people are like onions: You can keep peeling, but you never quite get down to the essence. You will arrive at a surprising — and moving — conclusion, likely not what you'll be suspecting. That's the kind of writing and performance to be found in this production. Through June 1. Tickets ($30-$75; $25 for teens and students, with the proviso that the show has strong language and mature themes): 513-421-3888. For lighter entertainment, I recommend Size Matters at Ensemble Theatre. It's a premiere by actor Raymond McAnally, who performs the one-man show. He's a big guy in the theater, literally: 300 pounds. plus. He's used his weight to his advantage to find acting gigs, but he tends to be typecast — fat slobs, geeks and so on. Not great for self-esteem, but hey, it's work. However, it can wear on one's confidence, and when he sees his young nephew going down a similar path, well, it's food for thought. There's nothing terribly profound about this script, but McAnally is a very adept performer — he takes on the roles of his father, his nephew, even his wife, with the assistance of projections and sound effects. McAnally says that this is 95 percent material drawn from real life, and it has the ring of truth. It's not likely that this show will be produced elsewhere unless McAnally does it himself, so here's a chance to see a one-of-a-kind performance that will keep you laughing and make you like a guy you might have otherwise dismissed. Through May 25. Tickets ($39-$43; half-price and $15 student rush tickets starts two hours prior to show time if seating is available): 513-421-3555. Cincinnati Music Theater opens its production of the classic musical Peter Pan at the Jarson-Kaplan Theater tonight (it runs through May 17). This top-notch community theater typically does a commendable job with big musicals, and this family-friendly piece is likely to be a big attraction, what with flying and local actor Joshua Steele in the title role. Tickets ($20-$24): 513-621-2782.
 
 
by Rick Pender 02.07.2014
Posted In: Theater at 10:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
stage

Stage Door: Choices Galore

Last evening I went to see Mary Zimmerman's Metamorphoses at UC's College-Conservatory of Music. You can read more about playwright Zimmerman in my column in this week's issue here, and you'll probably figure out that this is one of my favorite scripts. CCM's drama program has created a shimmering, playful production that's getting a brief run (final performance is a 2 p.m. matinee Sunday) at Patricia Corbett Theatre. Guest director D. Lynn Meyers took a break from Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati to travel up the hill and stage this one on the UC campus, and her cast of 18 student performers wholly embraced this unusual show — which requires a pool of water as its central design feature. (Water plays a significant and meaningful role in the retelling of a set of classical myths shaped and recorded by Ovid two millennia ago.) But Dana Hall's scenic design doesn't stop with water; it's elemental, with immense hanging slabs of stone that resonate with the decorative concrete slabs in PCT. Wes Richter's lighting — it really does shimmer — enhances the stories of characters changed by circumstances, good intentions and bad decisions, and Kevin Semancik's sound design brings vivid punctuation to many stories, including a destructive storm at sea. Speaking of sound, cellist Jacob Yates, a senior at CCM, composed moody accompaniment that distills the moving emotional essence of each scene; he performs live from stage left as the tales unfold. Amanda Kai Newman's costume designs complete the visual power of the show, whether they are fluttering around the edge of the pool or from a high balcony upstage from which the gods watch and control the mortals — and even when they are sopping wet from action in the variable-depth pool. Much of the action is beautifully choreographed and delivered with confident physicality. All in all, CCM's Metamorphoses is a total theatrical package that's definitely worth seeing. Tickets are likely available if you call quickly: 513-556-4183.. If you want a two-fer featuring shows staged by D. Lynn Meyers, you can catch her production of Tribes back at her ETC home base. (CityBeat review here.) Nina Raine's script focuses on two young adults who come from different "tribes," families with distinctively separate approaches to deafness. Billy's family wants to approximate normalcy by teaching him to lip read, while Sylvia's parents, both deaf, have used signing. Now that she's going deaf herself and has befriended Billy, these practices are at odds. But this is also a show about family dynamics, love and acceptance — something everyone can relate to. Billy's family is boisterous and rude, behaviors that often exclude him. Sylvia's gentle, thoughtful manner is both solace and revelation to him. Actors Dale Dymkoski and Kelly Mengelkoch (familiar to Cincinnati Shakespeare audiences; she's a company member there) are simply excellent in these two roles, and the balance of the cast creates real, human characters. Tribes has been extended to Feb. 22, a week beyond its announced closing, to accommodate ticket demand. Tickets: 513-421-3555. Other productions worth checking out this weekend are Seminar by Falcon Theater at Newport's Monmouth Theater, a play by Cincinnatian Theresa Rebeck about a writing class with a tyrannical teacher (CityBeat review here; tickets: 513-479-6783); Bruce Norris's Pulitzer Prize-winning Clybourne Park, revealing how attitudes about race and class haven't evolved all that much in 50 years, at Cincinnati Playhouse (CityBeat review here; tickets: 513-421-3888); and Steve Yockey's absurdist drama Pluto at Know Theatre, an inventively told story of contemporary grief (CityBeat review here; tickets: 513-300-5669).
 
 

Tribes (Review)

Can you hear me now? 'Tribes' at Ensemble Theatre

0 Comments · Friday, February 7, 2014
Nina Raine’s award-winning play Tribes is overtly — and creatively — about people living with deafness. But it’s also a story of families and the human need to connect.   
by Rick Pender 01.03.2014
Posted In: Theater at 09:34 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage copy

Stage Door: Couple of Classics

Truth to tell, midnight has already passed and Victorian adventurer Phileas Fogg thinks he's missed the deadline for getting "around the world in 80 days." But his faithful servant Passepartout (played with manic energy by the always amusing Michael G. Bath) saves the day by sorting out travel across time zones. Your deadline has not quite passed, since Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati's inventive staging of a musical version of Jules Verne's classic Around the World in 80 Days continues through a 2 p.m. matinee on Sunday. (CityBeat review here.) If football and cold weather aren't your preferences, maybe you should head to the Over-the-Rhine theater for a final volley of holiday entertainment. Tickets: 513-421-3555. While you're thinking about theater, you should be making plans to see Shakespeare's greatest tragedy (some say it's the greatest play ever written), Hamlet, which opens next week at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. Once you've taken that one in, you'll be ready to head back in mid-February for Tom Stoppard's other-end-of-the-telescope version of the show (using the same actors), Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. Tickets: 513-381-2273. Happy New Year!
 
 

Local Stages Kept Things Interesting in 2013

0 Comments · Monday, December 23, 2013
How was 2013 as a year for plays and musicals in Cincinnati? From where I stand — or sit, since I’m most often in a seat at one of our local theaters — it stacked up pretty well.  

Around The World in 80 Days (Review)

Entertaining, Charming and Heart-Warming

1 Comment · Monday, December 9, 2013
Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati opened a revamped version of the delightfully spirited Around The World in 80 Days on Dec. 4 to a full house. The production is exactly what you would hope for from a family-friendly holiday show.  
by Rick Pender 10.11.2013
Posted In: Theater at 09:28 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_onstage_raptureblisterburn_ryankurtz

Stage Door: Solid Choices

Several great choices for theatergoing this weekend. At the top of your list should be Rapture, Blister, Burn at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati. I was at the opening of Gina Gionfriddo's 2013 Pulitzer Prize runner-up on Wednesday, and it's another fine example of the kind of excellent production we've come to expect from ETC. Lynn Meyers has a knack for finding exactly the right actors for her shows, and she's assembled a perfect cast for this one, the story of a twisty relationship between three one-time college friends. Two women, played by Jen Joplin and Corinne Mohlenhoff, were roommates back then, and Mohlenhoff's character had a charismatic boyfriend. She went off to a renowned academic career and Joplin's character ended up marrying Don, played by Charlie Clark. Twenty years later they're back in close proximity, and neither woman is feeling fulfilled by her life. Don is a willing player in trading places, which makes for some amusing drama. Mohlenhoff's character offers a summer seminar in feminism, film and pornography which plays out some interesting theorizing among the show's female characters about the roles women play. It's a great stew of talking and experimenting, which takes some interesting turns along the way. Definitely watchable and entertaining. Onstage through Oct. 27. Tickets: 513-421-3555. At the Playhouse you'll find Martín Zimmerman's much more serious Seven Spots on the Sun, a story set in a Latin American nation torn asunder by civil war. (CityBeat review here.) We see the drama played out between several characters whose lives are tragically intertwined and who struggle to understand how to continue in light of past decisions and tragedies. It's a powerful story that offers small glimmers of hope, not to mention some magical turns that lead you to speculate about fate and hope. Zimmerman is a playwright whose name will become increasingly familiar in the future; the Playhouse is offer his script in its world premiere. Onstage through Oct. 27. Tickets: 513-421-3888. If you're looking for a different kind of theater experience, check out New Edgecliff Theatre's annual fundraiser, "Sweet Suspense," back for its sixth year with a one-time performance on Sunday evening. Playwright Catie O'Keefe has adapted Mary Shelley's classic monster tale of Frankenstein into a radio adaptation, complete with creepy sound effects. Since NET is homeless this season, the event is happening at Know Theatre at 7:30 p.m. The "sweet" part of the evening is a dessert buffet at intermission with treats from many local bakeries, including Holtman's Donuts, the hot new sweet shop on Vine Street in OTR. Tickets are $35 (hey, it's a fundraiser) for adults, $20 for kids 13 and under. Seating is limited, so ordering tickets in advance is advised: 513-399-6638.
 
 

Finding a Niche in Local Theater — and Seeking More

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 17, 2013
In recent columns I surveyed Cincinnati theater companies that came and went during the past 20 years. Some stumbled because their founders had more passion than management expertise; others simply lacked the focus to keep audiences coming back. The truth is it’s hard to identify a niche and settle into it  

0|1
 
Close
Close
Close