WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Cincinnati vs. The World 10.10.2012

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 10, 2012
The nurse who was the famous receiver of the lip-locking depicted in the iconic 1945 “Kissing Sailor” photo from Times Square symbolically marking the end of WWII attests she was actually manhandled against her will by the sailor, who was a complete stranger; by modern standards, that’s an instance of sexual assault that’s been glorified. WORLD -2    
by Andy Brownfield 09.17.2012
 
 
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Obama Announces Trade Action against China at Cincinnati Stop

Local Republicans criticize president's record on deficit in counter-rally

President Barack Obama announced a new trade action against China during a Cincinnati campaign stop on Monday, where he also took the opportunity to attack Republican challenger Mitt Romney. The U.S. filed the case at the World Trade Organization on Monday and claims that China offers “extensive subsidies” to native automakers and auto-parts producers. The Chinese government filed its own complaint before the WTO on Monday, challenging tariffs the U.S. imposes on Chinese products ranging from steel to tires. The tariffs are meant to protect American manufacturers against what the U.S. government claims are unfair trade practices by China. “(The U.S. action is) against illegal subsidies that encourage companies to ship auto part manufacturing jobs overseas,” Obama said before an estimated crowd of 4,500 at the Seasongood Pavilion in Eden Park. “These are subsidies that directly harm working men and women on the assembly lines in Ohio and Michigan and across the Midwest.” “It’s not right, it’s against the rules, and we will not let it stand. American workers build better products than anyone. ‘Made in America’ means something. And when the playing field is level, America will always win.” Obama went on to criticize his Republican challenger, saying Romney made his fortune in part by uprooting American jobs and shipping them to China. Obama accused Romney — who has criticized Obama’s foreign policy, saying the president apologizes for American interests — of talking the talk without being able to walk the walk. The Romney campaign countered with an email after the rally, saying that Obama’s economic policies were hurting the private sector and harmed manufacturing. “The President’s misguided, ineffective policies have hampered the private sector and allowed China to flaunt the rules while middle-class families suffer,” Romney campaign spokeswoman Amanda Henneberg wrote.  “As president, Mitt Romney will deliver a fresh start for manufacturers by promoting trade that works for America and fiscal policies that encourage investment, hiring and growth.” The email pointed to reports from Bloomberg finding that manufacturing and production have shrunk recently. Before the Obama rally several Ohio Republicans held a news conference behind a Romney campaign bus near Eden Park, where they focused more on the deficit than foreign trade. U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot said it was “laughable” that Obama considers himself a budget hawk. He pointed to the decline in budget negotiations between the president and the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, saying Obama “walked away” from talks with Speaker John Boehner. “Basically as president from that time last August until now, it’s been all politics,” Chabot said. Chabot also attacked Obama on foreign policy, claiming the president has left Israel hanging in the Middle East and is not serious with Iran, who he says is on the brink of getting nuclear weapons. The president in his speech said he did have a plan to reduce the federal deficit, and would reduce it by $4 trillion over the next 10 years without raising taxes on the middle class. Monday’s visit to Cincinnati was Obama’s second of this campaign and his 12th trip to Ohio this year. Romney has visited the state 18 times during his campaign. Obama was scheduled to fly to Columbus Monday afternoon for a campaign appearance there.
 
 
by Mike Breen 08.02.2012
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 02:31 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
a_love_supreme

Music Tonight: It's Commonly Jazz Tributes Coltrane

Annual free summer Jazz series kicks off this evening in Eden Park

The long-running, always-solid It's Commonly Jazz music series returns to Eden Park's Seasongood Pavilion this evening. The series (now in its impressive 27th season) brings free, live Jazz music to the park every Thursday this month, with concerts running 6-8 p.m.The concerts have always been a superb mix of some great nationally-touring headliners and many of Cincinnati's top Jazz players. Next week, on Aug. 9, Dan Karlsberg headlines ICJ with a quintet that includes local greats Marc Fields and Brent Gallaher, plus Karlsberg's mates Steve Whipple and Anthony Lee (who now work out of New York). Renowned drummer Kenny Phelps plays ICJ on Aug. 16 with special guest trombonist Wycliffe Gordon, plus Jim Anderson on bass and Zach Lapidus on keys. Local Jazz hero Phil DeGreg brings his Samba Jazz Syndicate to the series on Aug. 23. The group also includes noted area players Rusty Burge, Kim Pensyl, Aaron Jacobs and John Taylor. The series concludes with the thoroughly excellent trumpeter Mike Wade and his septet (acclaimed saxman Steve Wilson guest stars).For tonight's opening concert, It's Commonly Jazz presents something a little different. The program, dubbed "A Love Supreme - Spiritual Music of John Coltrane," was originally presented in Louisville by vibraphonist Dick Sisto. The debut tribute to the Jazz legend's "spiritual" sides — including A Love Supreme album material and works from Meditations — was such a success, Sisto put together a quintet and hit the road, performing the show across the region. Joining Sisto tonight is Steve Allee on keys, Rob Dixon on sax, Steve Houghton on drums and Jim Anderson (again!) holding down the bass. Here's Coltrane's full masterpiece to get you in the mood. Click here for more on It's Commonly Jazz.
 
 

Cincinnati vs. The World 4.4.12

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 3, 2012
A 118-year-old pump station and water tower in Eden Park could soon be home to a microbrewery and tasting room if city officials approve the developers’ request to overhaul the building. The developers are reportedly members of the Martin family, which already owns the Cincinnati Beer Company.  
by Kevin Osborne 03.29.2012
 
 
bike_touring

Morning News and Stuff

Cincinnati officials appear ready to ignore the recommendations of city staffers and allow a project that would add a bicycle lane along an East End road to proceed. The city's Transportation and Engineering Department had wanted to delay the bike lane on Riverside Drive for up to two years while construction was occurring to reconfigure a portion of I-471 in Northern Kentucky. Engineers were worried that motorists would use Riverside as an alternate route to avoid 471, and any work there might cause rush hour bottlenecks. But a Cincinnati City Council majority indicated Wednesday it doesn't agree with the assessment. Council members will discuss the issue again at a committee meeting in two weeks.Cincinnati officials are mulling whether a 118-year-old pump station and water tower behind Krohn Conservatory in Eden Park could be sold and converted into a micro-brewery. The Cincinnati Beer Co. approached the city to redevelop the 7,000-square-foot property so it could make small batches of beer there to sell to local restaurants. The buildings are now used for storage.E.W. Scripps Co. gave more than $4.4 million in cash and stock awards last May as a severance deal to the person who once managed the firm's newspaper division. Details on severance payments to Mark Contreras were disclosed in Scripps' proxy statement to shareholders on Monday. Contreras was a senior vice president for six years until he was fired on May 25, 2011. The Cincinnati-based media giant wouldn’t say why Contreras was terminated. During Contreras’ tenure, Scripps eliminated 2,500 newspaper jobs, including those lost when The Cincinnati Post was closed in 2007.Oxford police say two Miami University students who were left bloody and battered in an altercation probably were attacked because they are gay. Michael Bustin told police he was walking home from a local bar near campus and holding hands with a male friend when four men approached them, yelled a slur, then began hitting them. That's when other students intervened and stopped the attack. The university responded swiftly, Bustin said, sending a bulletin to the campus community.Meanwhile, an LGBT group in Lexington, Ky., has filed a discrimination complaint against a T-shirt printer after the company refused to honor a bid to produce apparel for an event. The Gay and Lesbian Services Organization filed the complaint Monday with the city’s Human Rights Commission. The group's president said it chose Hands On Originals to print t-shirts for a local gay pride festival, but the company refused to take the order. A Lexington official said the firm is subject to the city’s human rights ordinance because it deals in goods and services to the public.In news elsewhere, the U.S. government blocked a court case arising from a multimillion-dollar business dispute so it could conceal evidence of a major intelligence failure shortly before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, British officials were told this week. David Davis, the former shadow home secretary, said the FBI planned to begin eavesdropping on all telephone calls into and out of Afghanistan in 1998 to acquire intelligence on the Taliban, but the program was delayed more than a year in a turf war with the CIA. It finally was implemented on Sept. 8, 2001. When a related court case was filed in New York, it was blocked and all records removed from the courts' public database on the grounds of the State Secrets Privilege, a legal doctrine that permits the U.S. government to stop litigation on the grounds of national security.New claims for unemployment benefits fell to a four-year low last week, according to a government report that indicates an economic recovery is underway. Initial claims for state unemployment benefits fell 5,000 to a seasonally adjusted 359,000, the lowest level since April 2008, the Labor Department said today.A police detective told the father of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin that his son initiated two confrontations with the neighborhood watch volunteer who fatally shot him. Tracy Martin, describing the police version of events Wednesday to The Washington Post, said he didn't believe the official account, which was conveyed to him two days after his 17-year-old son was killed Feb. 26.In related news, police surveillance video of the teenager's killer, George Zimmerman, appears to contradict portions of Zimmerman's version of what happened that night. The video shows no blood or bruises on Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch captain who says he shot Martin after he was punched in the nose, knocked down and had his head slammed into the ground. The video, obtained by ABC News, shows Zimmerman arriving in a police cruiser. As he exits the car, his hands are cuffed behind his back. Zimmerman is frisked and then led away, still cuffed.A major influence in Bluegrass music died Wednesday. Earl Scruggs, the banjo player whose hard-driving picking style influenced generations of players, died in a Nashville hospital at age 88. Although Scruggs had a long and critically acclaimed music career, he is perhaps best known to the public for performing the theme song to the TV sitcom, The Beverly Hillbillies, with his guitar-playing partner, Lester Flatt.
 
 

It's Commonly Jazz with William Menefield

August 5 • Seasongood Pavilion

0 Comments · Tuesday, August 3, 2010
It's Commonly Jazz is not only one of the best and longest running free Jazz concert series in the region; it's also one of the "greenest" music events in the Midwest. The series, in its 25-year-history, has showcased superstars and legends like McCoy Tyner, Terence Blanchard, Eddie Harris and David "Fathead" Newman.  

Catch Catfish at The Comet

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 5, 2009
Billy Catfish is a man about town of the highest order and a renaissance man to boot. The good-humored, sometimes-mustachioed/bearded bard has been a performing and recording musician since '89, playing with numerous Experimental, Punk and Garage bands. In keeping with our town's musical zeitgeist, he's currently doing the "laid-back Country-Folk Singer-Songwriter thing."  

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