WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by German Lopez 02.03.2014
Posted In: News, Police, Mayor at 10:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
cpd more cops

City Unveils Plan to Add More Cops

Proposal shifts enforcement to overtime, hot spots and youth outreach

City officials on Monday announced a new public safety initiative that promises to put more cops on the streets, focus on “hot spots” of crime, restart the gang unit and do more to reach out to youth. The comprehensive plan comes after a rough start to the year, with homicides and violent crime ticking up even as the weather remains cold. Among other initiatives, the plan will add more cops on the ground through new hires, more overtime and a new recruit class — the first since 2008. “The message to people is that help is on the way,” Mayor John Cranley said. The plan will come at higher costs to an already-strained operating budget. Cranley said the Cincinnati Police Department set aside nearly $1 million for the proposal through June, while the remaining $5.6 million should be funded in the city’s $370-plus million operating budget. When asked whether initiatives like the one announced Monday will hurt the budget, Cranley reiterated his long-standing position that public safety takes top priority in the city budget. Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell said the refocus intends to prevent, not just solve, crimes. He acknowledged more cops alone won’t end the city’s crime problem, but he argued increasing the level of evidence-based enforcement — through new tactics supported by more cops on the streets — could make a difference. Cranley and Blackwell cautioned the results might not be immediate, but they said it’s an important step to stop levels of crime local residents are clearly unhappy with. Hot spot policing carries a high level of empirical support. In two different studies from Rutgers and the Ministry of Justice in the Netherlands, researchers argued the strategy doesn’t always displace crime; it can also prevent crime by deterring and discouraging future incidents in hot spots and surrounding areas — what researchers call a “diffusion” of benefits.But the concept also needs to be executed carefully. In New York City, “stop and frisk” became a fairly unpopular type of hot spot policing after some reports found the strategy targeted racial makeups in neighborhoods more than levels of crime.Of course, better policing isn’t the only way to combat crime. As two examples, lead abatement and ending the war on drugs could prevent violence by reducing aggression and eliminating a huge source of income for drug cartels.This story was updated to include more information from the city manager’s memo.
 
 

Police Attribute Increase in Homicides to Gang-Related Activity

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 8, 2014
Heads of the Cincinnati Police Department testified in front of City Council’s Law and Public Safety Committee on Jan. 6 to address the local increase in homicides.   

Kinda Like Crazy

2 Comments · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Generalizing to make a point, barring slave revolts, domestic violence and deadly gun play during drug deals gone wrong, blacks, historically, haven’t been much for mass public shooting sprees or for violently acting out in public to instigate what can only be called “death by cop.”  

O.J. 2.0

4 Comments · Wednesday, September 11, 2013
The man who shot and killed Trayvon Martin will go to jail for something.We just do not know yet exactly what the charge will be. This is the O.J. Factor.  

I Got Robbed

1 Comment · Wednesday, September 11, 2013
There have been some unexpected little silver linings; one, I remembered how and why I live in Over-the-Rhine, and two, I remembered how to live.   
by German Lopez 09.05.2013
Posted In: Drugs, News, Parking, Homelessness at 09:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
coverstory-header

Morning News and Stuff

War on drugs fails goals, housing complex raises concerns, courts deny parking challenges

With the war on drugs widely considered a failure after more than four decades, experts are suggesting legalization and decriminalization as viable alternatives. One concern: Despite recent attempts at sentencing reform, Ohio’s prison population is set to grow further and breach a capacity barrier previously set by the U.S. Supreme Court in a ruling against California. With costs rising and drug use rates seemingly unaffected by harsher enforcement, groups of academics, former law enforcement officials and civil libertarians say it’s time to look at states and countries that have abandoned criminalization and harsh enforcement with great success. To read the full story, click here. A planned supportive housing facility in Avondale is raising concerns for residents who claim the complex could hurt a neighborhood already plagued by poverty, crime, obesity, unemployment and homelessness. Particularly worrying for Avondale 29, the group opposing the plans, is that the facility is near a daycare and elementary school, which the group says could have a negative impact on neighborhood children. Supporters of the facility say the opposition is based on widespread misinformation. They point to a similar similar supportive housing facility in Columbus, which, according to the Columbus Police Department’s Gary Scott, had a positive impact on the community surrounding it. Opponents of Cincinnati’s parking lease were dealt two major blows in court yesterday: The Ohio Supreme Court declined to hear their first legal challenge and effectively upheld the city’s referendum-immune emergency powers, and the Hamilton County Common Pleas Court refused to place a temporary restraining order on the lease despite claims that the city manager made “significant and material” changes to the deal without City Council approval. Both the challenges come from the conservative Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST), which claims parking rates and enforcement hours will rise because the city is ceding too much power over its services by leasing its parking meters, lots and garages to the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority. Supporters of the parking lease argue the plan is necessary to leverage the city’s parking assets to finance development projects that will grow the city’s tax base. Commentary: “Secrecy Plagues Potentially Good Programs.” The city is fighting to have a document removed from its legal battle over the streetcar with Duke Energy. City officials says the document is “nothing scandalous” and the city just made a mistake by accidentally disclosing it, but a Duke attorney says the document is a source of “embarrassment” for the city and important to the case. As part of an agreement, Cincinnati and Duke are arguing in court to settle who has to pay an estimated $15 million to move utility lines to accommodate for the streetcar route. Advocates of the federally funded Medicaid expansion yesterday filed petitions to the state attorney general’s office to get the issue on the 2014 ballot. As part of Obamacare, states are asked to expand their Medicaid programs to include anyone up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. If they accept, the federal government would pay for 100 percent of the expansion’s cost for three years then indefinitely phase down to 90 percent. The Health Policy Institute of Ohio found the expansion would save Ohio $1.8 billion and insure half a million Ohioans. Gov. John Kasich, a Republican, and state Democrats support the expansion, but Republican legislators are resisting it. More than two-thirds of Ohioans support laws that protect gays and lesbians against job discrimination, but more than four in five mistakenly think such laws are already in place at the state and federal levels, according to the 2013 Ohio Values Survey from the Public Religion Research Institute. The survey also found a slim majority of Ohioans oppose amending the state constitution to allow same-sex marriage, which somewhat contradicts earlier polls from The Washington Post and Quinnipiac University that found a plurality of Ohioans now support same-sex marriage. State agencies are probing the second high-profile suicide in an Ohio prison in the past month. Ariel Castro, a Cleveland man who was sentenced to life for kidnapping three women and beating and raping them as he held them for a decade, was found hanging on Tuesday after an apparent suicide. His death was the seventh suicide in an Ohio prison this year and the 35th since 2008. “As horrifying as Mr. Castro’s crimes may be, the state has a responsibility to ensure his safety from himself and others,” said Christine Link, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, in a statement. “Questions remain whether Mr. Castro was properly screened for suicide risk and mental illness.” The Ohio Development Services Agency is offering $30 million in loans and grants to employers who train their workforce. “Building a strong economy is about ensuring Ohio’s workforce has the tools it needs for success,” said David Goodman, director of the Ohio Development Services Agency, in a statement. “We want our workforce to be ready for the competitive jobs of tomorrow.” Ohio legislators are asking the federal government to pursue a balanced-budget amendment. Although the amendment might sound like a good idea in campaign platitudes, many economists agree it’s a bad idea because it limits the federal government’s flexibility in reacting to economic downturns that typically cause deficits by lowering tax revenues and increasing the amount of people on government services. A Fairfield, Ohio, woman is being forced by the Fairfield Board of Zoning Appeals to get rid of five of her seven dogs. The woman, who says she suffers from depression, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, says she needs the dogs to cope. The zoning board said it had heard anonymous complaints from neighbors, which apparently convinced the board to not provide an exemption for Fairfield’s two-pet limit.Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble is considering dropping some products and offering low-price alternatives for others in response to growing concerns about lacking performance.For the second time in a year, an Ohio judge is publicly shaming a convicted idiot. A new implant allows doctors look into people’s brains.
 
 

Orientation

1 Comment · Wednesday, August 21, 2013
In the herd there are so many students who come to college who’ve absolutely no business there; they’re no more prepared for the intellectual rigor, the dicey social matrix and the expectation of talent in their respective disciplines than an average junior high school student, and no one’s had that come-to-Jesus conversation with them until maybe well into their third year.  

Zimmerman Reactions Overlook Broader Racial Issues in America

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 17, 2013
The focus on the Zimmerman trial and its surrounding racial controversy has left out discussion of systemic racial problems in America.  

Cincinnati vs. The World 06.05.2013

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 5, 2013
In an effort to differentiate himself from his Democratic opponents, Libertarian mayoral candidate Jim Berns plans to hand out free marijuana plants at a campaign event. CINCINNATI -1  

Mo' (Fake) Money, Mo' (Real) Problems

5 Comments · Wednesday, March 6, 2013
LaSalle High School is in denial about its drug problem. Anytime students stupidly decide to trick an armed drug dealer with counterfeit money, all kinds of socioeconomic and chemical problems are in play beyond the pranksterism and tomfoolery of bored white teenage boys.  

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