WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Carmon DeLeone’s ‘Peter Pan’ Score Soars

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Celebrating his 46th anniversary as music director for the Cincinnati Ballet, Carmon DeLeone has a lot to be proud of.   
by Benjamin Kitchen 07.10.2014
Posted In: Classical music, Visual Art at 11:23 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Expands Access to LumenoCity Series

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra has announced expanded access to their forthcoming LumenoCity series at Over-the-Rhine’s Washington Park after initial tickets sold out in 12 minutes. At last year’s inaugural LumenoCity, a total of 35,000 spectators were dazzled over the course of two nights as Music Hall was lit up with three-dimensional graphics, bringing OTR to life with a visual and musical spectacle. When tickets for a trio of concerts on Aug. 1-3 became available to the general public in June, CSO clocked more than 300,000 visits to its website, and the event capacity of 37,500 over three nights was reached in 12 minutes. CSO has unveiled plans to make the groundbreaking concert experience open to an even larger number of Cincinnatians, streaming each concert live on the web at lumenocity2014.com and broadcasting to nearly 900,000 households throughout the region. “From day one, LumenoCity has been guided by a spirit and character of equity, access and generosity,” said CSO President Trey Devey. “Demand for the event far exceeds the capacity of the Washington Park viewing area.” “Now, we’re able to make this free event available on television, radio, live simulcast sites and the worldwide web. It is our goal to reach as many people as possible with LumenoCity and highlight the extraordinary creative energy of our community.” 90.9 WGUC, Cincinnati’s classical public radio station, will broadcast the performance live on Friday, Aug. 1, which will open LumenoCity up to listeners who can eye Music Hall from hilltops or rooftops. Public television station CET will air the event on Saturday, Aug. 2. In addition to live Internet streams, the third and final performance will be simulcast at Fountain Square and Riverbend Music Center on Sunday, Aug. 3. Additionally, CSO will issue 5,000 free tickets for a dress rehearsal on Thursday, July 31. CSO is also putting 3,300 newly released tickets for the trio of shows up for grabs, which will be issued for free via a drawing. Patrons may register at lumenocity2014.com, but those who already have reserved tickets will not be eligible. The 2014 LumenoCity concert performances will begin at 8:30 p.m. each of the three evenings with John Morris Russell conducting the Orchestra as the Cincinnati Pops. After a brief intermission, Music Director Louis Langrée will lead the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. The visual effects will accompany a live 40-minute CSO program featuring works from Copland, John Adams, Tchaikovsky, Elgar and Borodin.
 
 
by Kelsey Kennedy 03.24.2014
Posted In: Classical music, Visual Art at 12:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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LumenoCity Returns this Summer with Three-Day Festival in Washington Park

Five years ago, Over-the-Rhine was considered one of the most dangerous and dilapidated neighborhoods in the United States, a title earned through a controversial analysis of the area’s crime statistics. Today it’s a different story, with Over-the-Rhine at the forefront of community revitalization, and Washington Park at the core of that progress. At last year’s inaugural LumenoCity, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra brought in a total of 35,000 spectators over two nights to see Music Hall come to life through a visual and musical collaboration. The crowds alone were proof of the growth OTR has made as a neighborhood and the mark it continues to make on Cincinnati. This year, the free concert experience will be expanded to three days – Aug. 1-3, rain or shine. The 40-minute, all-new visual performances promise heart-pounding music paired with stunning animation. Using a technique called architectural mapping, three-dimensional graphics will be projected from trailers on Race Street onto the façade of Music Hall, quite literally shining a light on a cherished city landmark. Each performance will begin at 8:30 p.m. with John Morris Russell conducting the orchestra as the Cincinnati Pops. After a brief intermission, Music Director Louis Langree will lead the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in the light show for the second time. In an interview with CityBeat’s Anne Arenstein last year, Langree stated why he loved performing in Over-the-Rhine over other venues: “There’s a great sense of creativity and innovation you can feel. Washington Park is a great venue. I know that at one time it was a sketchy place but now it’s alive and thriving. To see so many thousands of people gathered to celebrate the city was marvelous.” The visual elements for the concert’s second half are being developed by Brave Berlin, a world-class creative design and production company based in Cincinnati. Music to be featured in the second performance include Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man,” John Adams’ “Short Ride in a Fast Machine,” the fourth movement from Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony, Elgar’s “Nimrod” and Borodin’s “Polovtsian Dances.” Details of the concert’s first half with Russell and the Cincinnati Pops will be announced on a date closer to the festival. LumenoCity isn’t just a collaboration between some of Cincinnati’s best music and art scenes, but a celebration of the city itself. In addition to the performances, organizers are planning an all-new LumenoCity Village with pre-concert performances, arts and crafts, and greatly expanded food and beverage services. Two additional speaker arrays are being added this year for improved sound coverage, as well as expanded restroom services. Performers from the May Festival Chorus, Cincinnati Ballet and Cincinnati Opera will also be showcased during the event.  The village will open at 3 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 1, and 11 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The designated viewing area inside Washington Park will be fenced in to ensure guest safety and comfort, and attendance within that designated area will be capped at 12,500 people each night. All are welcome, and this year’s concerts will be free to the general public, but ticketed. Advance tickets will be offered starting May 19 to CSO and Pops season ticket holders. Complimentary tickets will be available starting Monday, June 9, at 8 a.m. at lumenocity.com and will be issued until capacity is reached. For audience members without a computer or Internet access, a supply of free tickets will be made available to several of CSO’s partner organizations. In addition to the www.lumenocity2014.com website, the CSO has established a LumenoCity telephone information line at 513-744-3372.
 
 
by Jason Gargano 03.21.2014
Posted In: Live Music, Music News, Interview, Festivals at 09:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Louis Langrée Talks MusicNOW

CSO's new music director talks collaboration with nine-year-old MusicNOW fest

Louis Langrée is well aware of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra's rich history. The CSO's freshly minted music director also knows part of that history includes the nurturing of contemporary composers and their often unconventional works.  Enter MusicNOW, Bryce Dessner's 9-year-old festival of adventurous sounds. (Read our conversation with Dessner here.) This year's sonic extravaganza includes the CSO's take on new pieces by such esteemed composers as Nico Muhly and David Lang, as well as the title work from Dessner's new Classical album, St. Carolyn by the Sea. CityBeat recently connected with the genial Langrée — who spoke in self-described "primitive" English by phone from Paris — to discuss the CSO's collaboration with MusicNOW.    CityBeat: Before we get into MusicNOW, I'm curious about your initial impressions of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. Why were you interested in coming on as music director? Louis Langrée: The fame the orchestra is really big. Everybody knows it's a major orchestra. But then making music with them was a completely different experience because, yes, they have the qualities of all major American orchestras — precision, clarity of the attack of the situation. But they have also from their heritage, in their DNA, this German conception of sound, that you build the sound from the base of the harmony. That means the density of the sound is something absolutely remarkable, and that's rare in the United States. I think it has to do with the tradition, the roots, of this orchestra and also, of course, about the quality and the spirit of the musicians, which is really wonderful.  CB: Why were you interested in collaborating with MusicNOW and taking on a festival of contemporary music? LL: One of the strengths of the orchestra is to have supported and commissioned and performed contemporary music from their very early age. Having given the American premiere Mahler Third, Mahler Fifth, Stravinsky coming to Cincinnati before he was considered a giant, having premiered (Aaron Copland's ) "Lincoln Portrait," having commissioned (Copland's) "Fanfare for a Common Man" and many other pieces and many more recent pieces. That's why I wanted to open my tenure as music director with eighth blackbird and Jennifer Higdon concerto piece. It shows that we should support, play, commission and perform contemporary music — and, of course, contemporary American music.  CB: What was it like collaborating with Bryce? LL: Meeting Bryce was a wonderful. His French is perfect. Especially compared to my primitive English. (Laughs). I like his attitude in making music and experimentation. And any strong institution should be also a place of experimentation. Music is not something you put in a museum. It's alive. And then we should perform contemporary music like Classical music and perform Beethoven music, not forgetting that he only composed contemporary music. All the composers — Mozart, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Bartok — composed contemporary music, so we have to continue it. He's very focused and concentrated, but on the other hand the spectrum was quite bright. I think we have arrived on wonderful programs — very challenging, but very exciting.  CB: What makes him unique as a composer? LL: He knows how to make an orchestra sound. It's a very clear and precise writing but at the same time there is so much flexibility in the variations of colors written and the flow of the music. It's always quite exciting to study a piece and hear it. Having the privilege of working with the composer is something wonderful because there are so many questions I would like to ask of Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, and of course it's impossible. So being able to ask the composer and to hear his answers is just wonderful.  Bryce is someone who has great harmonic taste, and I think for the orchestra it's wonderful because you can express yourself much easier. I think he's very much like his music — a very welcoming man, a very open, very luminous person. I see that in his music, which is not always the case with composers. With him, I get the feeling he's one with his music.  CB: How has the orchestra responded to playing these new, sometimes challenging pieces? LL: Any new piece you don't know what to expect. What I've found is that these musicians are very open-minded, they are very generous and positive in their attitude and are eager to try any new experience. It's a privilege to perform these two concerts of new music, but it's also very challenging, so you have to be very practical.  CB: And what's the experience been like for you? LL: It's a great responsibility when you conduct a piece, but it's also a great privilege that today's major American composers are willing to write for us. To be sharing this experiment and experience in concert, to be a part of MusicNOW, is really something beautiful. MusicNOW's 2014 festival begins tonight and continues tomorrow. Visit musicnowfestival.org for tickets and full programming details.
 
 

Now and Then

Bryce Dessner collaborates with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra for this year’s MusicNOW fest

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 18, 2014
On the eve of its ninth festival, MusicNOW founder and The National guitarist Bryce Dessner says after next year he’ll re-evaluate continuing the fest in its current state.  

Washington Park's Success Spurs a MusicNOW 'Portrait'

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 12, 2014
The recent $46 million restoration/reinvention of Over-the-Rhine’s Washington Park is already reaping artistic dividends — it’s responsible for a new musical tribute to the transformative powers of landscape architecture.  

Louis Voilà!

Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra Music Director Louis Langrée on his debut concert, Cincinnati and LumenoCity's afterglow

0 Comments · Wednesday, November 6, 2013
 During our conversation (in French), it becomes clear that the CSO’s marketing blast, “Louis + CSO + You,” sums up Langrée’s vision for the orchestra and the community: He frequently uses partager, French for “to share.”  
by Jac Kern 08.02.2013
Posted In: Events, Fun, Music, Performances at 12:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List: 8/2-8/4

Music Hall will come to life this weekend. Thanks to a collaboration between Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Landor Associates and funding from local organizations, the Cincy landmark will be part of LumenoCity, a first-of-its-kind multimedia performance in Washington Park Saturday and Sunday. Many details of the performance won’t be revealed until the show, but we know it involves live orchestra music set to a process called architectural mapping — where three-dimensional graphics are projected onto a building’s surface, interacting with its architectural details, causing the building to illuminate and appear in motion. This process of mapping has been done before (just check out the video below), but never like what we’ll see this weekend. LumenoCity also marks Maestro Louis Langrée’s arrival as the CSO’s new musical director. The free concert takes place at 8:30 p.m. in Washington Park Saturday and Sunday. Bring your own seating. Read more about the event here. Newly opened OTR brewery Rhinegeist unveils its limited edition Saber Tooth Tiger IPA with a celebration Saturday. This Imperial IPA is the brewery’s first “Rarity,” meaning they’ll brew it only once and have a limited amount. Admission to the release party is $10 and includes a goblet with 12 oz. of STT and guaranteed option to purchase a 32 oz. growler of the IPA. There will also be local food vendors, live music, merch for purch(ase) and more. The event runs 5-10 p.m. Saturday. Buy tickets here. The city’s definitely got a case of the blues this weekend with Cincy Blues Fest at Sawyer Point Friday-Saturday and Findlay Market’s Blue BBQ Sunday. The Cincy Blues Society’s CBF turns 21 this year, bringing dozens of Blues acts from around the country. Check out our preview here. From noon-4 p.m. Sunday, Findlay Market’s eighth annual Blue BBQ brings local Blues musicians together with delicious barbeque from Eli’s BBQ, Velvet Smoke and other area restaurants. Go here for more info. It’s an end of a sweaty era Saturday as Northside Tavern holds the final Dance_MF EVER. Projectmill’s monthly first Saturday dance party has been going strong for five years, steaming up the Tavern’s back room and even taking to the high seas (or at least the Ohio River) for a couple RiverDance_MF events on a boat. So limber up, drink up and dance your ass off one last time, starting at 10 p.m.For more art openings, summer festivals and other stuff to do this weekend, check out our To Do picks, full calendar and Rick Pender’s Stage Door for weekend theater offerings.
 
 
by Rick Pender 08.02.2013
Posted In: Theater at 08:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
charlie cromer and maggie lou rader - photo jeanna vellacincy shakes - romeo & juliet (shakespeare in the park tour) -

Stage Door: Double Dose from CSC

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company is offering a double dose of entertainment this weekend. First and foremost is The 39 Steps at CSC's mainstage (CityBeat review here). If that title sounds familiar, it's because it was a classic espionage novel a century ago, made into a classic film by Alfred Hitchcock 80 years ago, now turned into a very funny riff on its predecessors as a play using only four actors to fill all the roles. CSC has ramped up the humor by using four of its best comedic actors — Nick Rose, Miranda McGee, Justin McComb and Billy Chace — who play the principals, plus much of the population of London, especially McComb and Chace who will make you dizzy as they shift from one part to another, sometimes within seconds. It's actually a faithful retelling of the story, but it's amped up to a high level of hilarity by the onstage shenanigans. It adds up to great summertime humor. It's being performed through Aug. 11. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1. One show isn't enough for CSC: This weekend they also launch their annual free Shakespeare in the Park tour with a performance of Romeo & Juliet at Boone Woods Park in Burlington at 7 p.m. on Saturday. (If you live north of the river, you'll get your chance next Wednesday evening at Eden Park's Seasongood Pavilion or at Burnet Woods in Clifton on Thursday.) As noted, these are free presentations, presented in classic Elizabethan style and use six actors from the company's resident ensemble. These are the same productions that CSC tours to schools and community centers, so they're great for the entire family. A week from now they'll start performing A Midsummer Night's Dream at some locations. For a full schedule, go here. Shakespeare is behind the story of Toil and Trouble, the current offering at Know Theatre. It's a new play (this is just the second time its been produced; its world premiere was in California last fall) that offers a contemporary riff on Macbeth (CityBeat review here). Instead of kings and warriors, however, its characters are a pair of thirtysomething slackers and Beth, a wildly ambitious sportscaster who has more testosterone than either of the guys. There's a lot of wacky moments in this play, replaces Macbeth's witches with fortune cookies and the kingdom of Scotland with an almost unpopulated island off the coast of Chile. You can pick up on the laughs through Aug. 24. Tickets: 513-300-5669. At the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, the annual production by Cincinnati Young People's Theatre is Grease, a tried-and-true musical about kids in the ’50s at Rydell High. Sixty years haven't dimmed the musicality of the show, and the youthful performers will bring this one to life if you're in the mood for a classic. It wraps up with a matinee on Sunday. Tickets: 513-241-6550. While the Cincinnati Symphony's LumenoCity isn't exactly theater, the performances in Washington Park on Saturday and Sunday evening — with a dazzling light show on the facade of Music Hall — will definitely be theatrical. It's the debut for Louis Langree as the CSO's new music director, and the program will feature performers from Cincinnati Ballet and Cincinnati Opera. But the big deal is the colorful illumination that will let you see historic Music Hall in a light you've never imagined. It's free, starting at 8:30 p.m. both nights; big crowds are expected, so come early. Don't you wish the streetcar were already here so you could ride it to Over-the-Rhine?
 
 
by Jac Kern 05.03.2013
at 01:53 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List: 5/3-5/5

With Cinco de Mayo falling on a weekend this year, you can bet the margaritas will be a-flowing at your favorite watering hole. Join us for our fourth annual Cantina Crawl Saturday for plenty of cerveza and swag at Bakersfield (6 p.m.), Nada (7 p.m.), El Coyle (8 p.m.), Pirate’s Cove (9 p.m.) and Tostado’s (10 p.m.) WARNING: Actually trying to drink at each location is probably unwise. Be safe and get yourself a designated driver! Find a full list of participating cantinas here. Photography duo The Hilton Brothers, Paul Solberg and Christopher Makos, are in town for the opening of their FotoFocus-sponsored exhibit at Miller Gallery Friday. The show features diptych photos of flowers, horses and the late, great Andy Warhol in drag. Meet the artists at Friday’s reception, 7-9 p.m. and look out for our interview with them in next week’s issue. They say April showers bring May flowers, so it makes perfect sense that this month’s Essex Studios Art Walk is themed “Bloom.” From 6-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday, more than 120 artists will show off their floral-inspired artwork of various mediums throughout the studios. Go here for full details. The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra has dubbed Friday Over-the-Rhine Night with its "Fanfare for Cincinnati" concert in Washington Park. The night kicks off with a bike ride starting at the park at 6 p.m., a comedy show by OTRimprov and plenty of on-site food trucks and vendors. The CSO concert runs 8-10 p.m., followed by more eats and a performance by Young Heirlooms until 11 p.m. Find a full event lineup and ticket info here. Comic books are making a comeback! With the popularization of superhero culture and hits like The Walking Dead, the old-school media is cool once again. Celebrate Free Comic Book Day Saturday at one of many local comic shops (search here) and swing by the Main Library downtown as it presents its first ComicCon Sunday. Local writer/musician Chris Charlton will be on hand at Covedale comic book shop, Rockin’ Rooster, Saturday and at the library’s panel discussion Sunday along with many other notable local comic writers, publishers and illustrators. Check out our interview with Charlton here.For more stuff to do this weekend, check out our To Do picks, full calendar and Rick Pender’s Stage Door for weekend theater offerings.
 
 

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