WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 

Art: Unkown Elements

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 26, 2015
In art, as in life, context is key. An image that would otherwise be treated with contempt — or worse, blithe indifference — can be illuminated with only a few facts. Likewise, stripped of its context, a piece of art can become something else entirely as the viewer imagines a contextual framework for the art.   

Event: Art After Dark

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Art After Dark celebrates the Cincinnati Art Museum’s new exhibit, Unknown Elements, which highlights anonymous photographs from the museum collection, paired with contemplative writings from local authors.  

Artists Anonymous

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 26, 2015
In art, as in life, context is key. An image that would otherwise be treated with contempt — or worse, blithe indifference — can be illuminated with only a few facts. Likewise, stripped of its context, a piece of art can become something else entirely as the viewer imagines a contextual framework for the art.   

Visual Arts

Art vs. Craft in Today’s Museums and Galleries

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 19, 2015
The theme for CityBeat’s Fall Arts Preview is “Arts & Craft.” But maybe it should be “Art vs. Craft,” because not only are the two different, but there is tension — hostility, even — between the two, especially with the emergence of Modern and Contemporary art in the late 19th and early 20th century.   

You Are Here … with Your Family

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 8, 2015
Family-friendly activities and locations to take the kids to over the weekend.   

The CAM Invites Viewers to Marvel at a Rare Collection with ‘Northern Baroque Splendor’

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 8, 2015
It is not often one is able to stand in the presence of almost indisputable masterpieces, but the Cincinnati Art Museum is offering just this opportunity with Northern Baroque Splendor.   

A Show-Stopping New Photo at the Cincinnati Art Museum

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 1, 2015
Normally, the acquisition of a new photograph by the Cincinnati Art Museum wouldn’t be that impactful. But Ryan McGinley’s “Petra (Pieces)” is different.   
by Steven Rosen 05.13.2015 110 days ago
at 02:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cr

Cincinnati Art Museum's James Crump Re-Emerges with a New Film

James Crump, the Cincinnati Art Museum's chief curator/photography curator who was a key figure in the planning and programming of the first FotoFocus festival in 2012 and then resigned from the museum in early 2013, has re-emerged as the director of a new documentary, Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art. It tells the story, with plenty of archival footage, of three restless New York artists in the who — as part of the 1960s/1970s rebellion against materialistic values sweeping American culture — sought to create epic art that was one with the outdoor environment, especially in the open and hard-to-access spaces of the west. That, they thought, would make it hard to buy and own. Robert Smithson created "Spiral Jetty" in Utah, Walter De Maria made New Mexico's "Lightning Field," and Michael Heizer did "Double Negative" in Utah and is still working on "City." (The other two are deceased.)Other artists featured in the film are Nancy Holt (who has an environmental artwork at Miami University), Dennis Oppenheim, Carl Andre and Vito Acconci. In an exchange of emails with CityBeat, Crump said he is hoping for the film to show at festivals and then get a limited theatrical release in fall, followed by availability on other distribution platforms. He also said his sales agent, Submarine Entertainment, represented Citizenfour and Finding Vivien Maier.Before coming to Cincinnati, Crump made a documentary about Robert Mapplethorpe's relationship to Sam Wagstaff, Black White + Gray.He has provided CityBeat with a link to Troublemakers' trailer:Trailer courtesy Summitridge Pictures. © RSJC LLC, 2015.
 
 
by Steven Rosen 04.24.2015 130 days ago
at 09:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
getfileattachment

Moby Dick Symposium Starts Today at CAM

NKU professor to moderate discussion on classic novel's 21st century impact

Tonight at 6:30 p.m., Cincinnati Art Museum will host a symposium on Moby-Dick: How a 19th Century Novel Speaks to the 21st Century. This free event features Elizabeth Schultz, author of Unpainted to the Last; Samuel Otter, editor of Leviathan; Matt Kish, author of Moby-Dick in Pictures, and Emma Rose Thompson of Northern Kentucky University. The moderator will be Robert K. Wallace, an English professor at Northern Kentucky University who has taught a course on Herman Melville's Moby-Dick since 1972. You can RSVP at moby-dick-symposium.eventbrite.com.  This is the opening event to a Moby-Dick Arts Festival, co-organized by Thompson and Wallace, that then takes place at the Covington branch of the Kenton County Public Library​ and NKU from Saturday through Monday. From 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, there will be a marathon reading of the novel at the library. You can sign up for a 10-minute slot at mobydick.nku.edu. There is also a Moby-Dick-related art exhibition at the library.  On Monday, there is an all-day symposium on the book at NKU, beginning at 9 a.m. in the Budig Theater. More information is available at mobydick.nku.edu.
 
 

Drawing on the Walls

Cincinnati Art Museum's Rosenthal Education Center gives adults and kids fresh ways to engage in arts learning

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 22, 2015
The Cincinnati Art Museum’s most recent renovation, the Rosenthal Education Center, built just to the left of the Great Hall, is bright, open and cheerful.   

0|1
 
Close
Close
Close