WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Rick Pender 04.11.2014 9 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door

Stage Door: Green Day and More

If you follow music coverage in CityBeat (hey, isn't that really why you pick up the paper?), you're certainly aware of Green Day's 2004 recording American Idiot. But since you're reading my weekend theater previews, you must be interested in other kinds of performance, so here's a tip: For two nights only, Green Day's American Idiot, a stage version of the powerful Punk score, will be onstage at the Aronoff. That's right — Friday and Saturday only, just three performances, much shorter that Broadway in Cincinnati's two-week presentation of touring Broadway musicals. I can vouch for this one, since I saw it a year ago during a similar tour stop in Dayton. It's the story of three disaffected guys who take different downward spirals when confronted with the numbing boredom of everyday life — "alien nation" — as they sing in the opening number. The recording was conceived as a "Punk Rock Opera" and turned into a Tony Award-nominated Broadway show in 2010, with a lot of involvement by Green Day's lead singer Billie Joe Armstrong (who actually appeared onstage in New York at various performances; that's not happening here in Cincinnati). There's a day-of-performance lottery for a limited number of $25 tickets; you need to show up two-and-a-half hours before the performance you're hoping to see (8 p.m. Friday, and 5 and 8 p.m. on Saturday) with a valid photo ID. Complete an entry form and wait 30 minutes to find out if you're a winner. If you prefer to just go ahead and buy your seats ($38-$91), you can call the Aronoff box office: 513-621-2787. In the classic musical Gypsy, Rose has very concrete ideas regarding how to turn her daughters into stars (long before Green Day was punking out, to be sure): Back in the 1920s and ’30s she pushed her kids onto vaudeville stages whether they liked it or not. Things never went quite as she imagined, which was really a desire for her own fame and stardom. It's one of the great musicals, and the role of Rose has been compared to King Lear. That might be a bit of a stretch, but she's a tragic character who's fascinating to watch. There's a ton of great music, composed by Jule Styne with lyrics by a very young Stephen Sondheim and lots of humor along the way, especially the hilarious number by three strippers, "You Gotta Get a Gimmick." Cincinnati Landmark opened its production Thursday night, and it will be onstage at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts through May 4. Tickets ($21-$24): 513-241-6550. Mary Chase's comedy Harvey won the 1945 Pulitzer Prize and had a four-year Broadway run (1,800 performances). The story of Elwood P. Dowd and his invisible friend, a 6-foot tall rabbit named Harvey, is perhaps best known for the 1950 movie featuring Jimmy Stewart in an Oscar-nominated performance. That's all well and good, but it's a show that audiences love to see live and in-person, and you can do just that at Covington's Carnegie for the next three weekends (tonight through April 27). It's directed by Buz Davis, who produced shows at the Carnegie when it was a dilapidated wreck back in the ’80s and ’90s. Now he's returning to stage Harvey in the beautifully renovated Otto M. Budig Theatre. (Tickets ($17-$24): 859-957-1940.) Davis has assembled a strong cast for this family-friendly comedy, you can catch a few of them in this charming promotional video:Still onstage are several recommended productions: The Mountaintop at Ensemble Theatre (final extended performance is Saturday evening; 513-421-3555); A Delicate Ship at the Cincinnati Playhouse (through April 20; 513-421-3888; CityBeat review here); and The Twentieth-Century Way at Know Theatre (through May 3; CityBeat review here.) And if Monday comes and you want still more: Check out True Theatre's next installment — True Dating (7:30 p.m. at Know Theatre). This round of monologues of real experiences will feature stories of dating that led to true love, and some that went off the tracks along the way. Tickets ($15): 513-300-5669.
 
 

Good Hair Day

Beauty stylists primp for another "Art of" blockbuster

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 8, 2014
Is The Art of Hair a quiet beauty compared with the hungry beast that is the Carnegie Center’s highly anticipated annual show The Art of Food? Nope. It’s a monster, too.   
by Rick Pender 08.23.2013
Posted In: Theater at 09:23 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Stage Door: Pre-Labor Day Offerings

A few good local productions are winding up this weekend. On Labor Day weekend, you won't find much onstage. But you have a couple of decent choices right now to tide you over. At the top of my list would be Chicago at the Carnegie (CityBeat review here). It's a classic musical by Kander & Ebb, getting an excellent staging — great performances (by some solid professionals with Broadway experience as well as rising talent from universities around the Tristate), great choreography (Bob Fosse's iconic style has been updated in some very imaginative ways) and really hot orchestral accompaniment (the musicians would be worth listening to on their own!) It all adds up to some fabulous razzle-dazzle. Final performance is Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets ($19-$26): 859-957-1940. Know Theatre wraps up its run of Lauren Gunderson's very contemporary comedy, Toil and Trouble, which has echoes of Shakespeare's Macbeth from start to finish (CityBeat review here). Inspired by messages from fortune cookies (in place of Macbeth's witches) A couple of slackers and their aggressive sportscaster girlfriend concoct a crazy scheme to grab power and wealth. Of course, it goes wildly wrong, with a lot of laughs along the way. Final performance is Saturday at 8 p.m. Tickets ($20): 513-300-5669 And if you're a Woody Allen fan, you might want to board the Showboat Majestic at the Public Landing for Don't Drink the Water, a play he wrote in 1966 that had a two-year run on Broadway. Set inside an American embassy behind the Iron Curtain, the show features lots of Allen's hallmarks: farcical situations, loopy characters and a high dose of humor. Final performance is Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets ($19-$20): 513-241-6550 The current issue of CityBeat includes previews of the fall arts season. It's online here, including my suggestions about shows from local theaters here.
 
 
by Rick Pender 08.09.2013
Posted In: Theater at 08:18 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door blog - 39 steps @ cincy shakes - nick rose & mranda mcgee - photo rich sofranko

Stage Door: Comedies and Classics

Summer is flying by, or so it seems. This is the final weekend for you to see Cincinnati Shakespeare's production of The 39 Steps (CityBeat review here), a satiric adaptation of Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1935 film of espionage and intrigue. Making it all the more amusing is the fact that the story is performed by four actors, two of whom play most of the citizens of London and beyond, using a lot of quick changes and quick thinking. It's a very entertaining evening of tomfoolery, featuring four of Cincy Shakes' most talented comedic actors. Your last chances to see the show are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. 513-381-2273.Another entertaining production is Lauren Gunderson's very new play, Toil and Trouble (CityBeat review here), at Know Theatre. It's a comedy about contemporary slackers trying to make a quick buck that's got a very Shakespearean ring to it — Macbeth, to be precise. The humor presses a bit too hard at moments, but if you go to have a good time, you'll definitely find one. Instead of warriors and kings vying for the throne, this one focuses on 30-year-olds trying to strike it rich without working too hard — but the echoes of the Elizabethan tragedy can't be missed. There's a steady stream of sports talk, too, making comparisons between baseball and life. It's a strange brew, but plenty of laughs. Through Aug. 24. Tickets: 513-300-5669. Musicals are always popular, but for some reason they seem especially attractive fare in the summer months. So we can say thanks to the Carnegie in Covington for serving up a tasty one, Kander and Ebb's Chicago, an all-time Broadway favorite. This production — the sexy, salacious tale of murderous women in Chicago in the 1920s — features choreography by Broadway veteran and Cincinnati native David Baum in his local professional debut. Word has it that he's put together some of the most inventive choreography seen on local stages in a long time. The production opens on Saturday evening (7:30 p.m.) and repeats on Sunday (3 p.m.). It continues for two more weekends, through Aug. 25. 859-957-1940. Also onstage this weekend (and running through Aug. 25) is Woody Allen's hit Broadway comedy, Don't Drink the Water. Amusingly, it's on board the Showboat Majestic (where you definitely don't want to drink the water) — but it's a humorous tale of tourists caught in an American embassy behind the Iron Curtain. Lightweight entertainment, but a lot of fun. 513-241-6550.
 
 

Theater on the Horizon

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Several slots for the 2013-2014 season have been filled in by local theaters as the current season finishes.  
by Rick Pender 04.19.2013
Posted In: Theater at 10:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cock photo- deogracias lerma

Stage Door: Bounty of Choices

There's a bounty of theater choices to keep you entertained this weekend, with productions on venues all over town — including on several university campuses. Here are a few you might want to check out. New Edgecliff Theatre, which has presented shows at the Columbia Performance Center on Cincinnati's East Side for quite a few years, has been itinerant this year while they seek a new home. They're completing their fifteenth season with a production of David Auburn's Proof at the Aronoff Center's Fifth Third Bank Theater, which looks like it's where they'll land for their next season. (I'll be writing more about NET in my next CityBeat "Curtain Call" column on April 24.) I attended the show's opening on Wednesday, and it's a solid production of a very engaging play, the winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize. Greg Procaccino, NET's former artistic director, has returned to stage a simple but effective production that features Rebecca Whatley as Catherine, the anxious, self-doubting young woman who has been a caregiver for years for her father, a renowned math professor whose mental instability has been a factor and a threat in his daughter's life. The show has several gripping twists and turns, as well as a satisfying resolution. Through April 27. Tickets: 513-621-2787. Last week I was at the opening of Cock, a regional premiere and Know Theatre's second production of the season. (CityBeat review here.) It's the story of a man falling out of a gay relationship and into one with a woman; he's torn by indecision and doubt about which way to go. The show is staged (by director Brian Robertson) like a cockfight, with the characters "pecking" at one another emotionally. It's also presented in an unusual setting, bertween two rows of bleachers (like a cockfight arena), so you're close to the action and able to see how others are responding. It's a fight to the finish, and you can never be certain of the outcome. Strong acting and a very contemporary, well-written script by British playwright Mike Bartlett. Through May May 11. Tickets: 513-300-5669. This is the final weekend at the Carnegie in Covington for the hard-hitting musical Parade by composer and lyricist Jason Robert Brown and playwright Alfred Uhry. (CityBeat review here.) It's based on the true story of Leo Frank, unjustly accused of murdering a young teenaged girl working in the factory he managed in Atlanta in 1913. A Jew from New York, Frank was the target of profound anti-Semitism and never had a realistic chance to defend himself, although his wife tried mightily to expose the prejudice. It's a powerful production, featuring a cast of musical theater talent from UC's College-Conservatory of Music, directed by Dee Anne Bryll and Ed Cohen. The show is not easy to watch, but it's deeply moving. Through Sunday. Tickets: 859-957-1940. Every two years since 1981, Northern Kentucky University has presented the Year End Series Festival — shortened to the "YES," ten days of presentations of three world premieres. This year's shows are a murder-mystery farce, Heart Attack with a Knife by Oded Gross; David L. Williams Spake, a drama set in Siberia; and a comic fable about fame and friendship, Furbelow by J. Stephen Brantley. YES is a gargantuan undertaking, and it represents how NKU prepares its drama students for careers in the theater. Shows are presented in rotating repertory, so you should check the Web site for specific performance dates. Tickets: 859-572-5464. At other area universities this weekend: At the Cohen Family Studio Theater at UC's College-Conservatory of Music, you can see a production of Emily Mann's Execution of Justice (UC's College-Conservatory of Music, through Sunday, 513-556-4183), a new docu-drama about the trial of Dan White for the murder of Harvey Milk, San Francisco's first openly gay Supervisor and Mayor George Moscone. It's staged by retiring UC drama professor Michael Burnham. And for musical theater fans, you can see Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's popular fairytale musical Into the Woods at Miami University (through April 27, 513-529-3200).
 
 
by Jac Kern 02.01.2013
Posted In: Events, Drinking, Fun at 02:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List: 2/1-2/3

Remember when you could buy a proper cocktail with the spare change in your pocket? OK, probably not, but you can still enjoy Prohibition-era prices at Japp’s new happy hour kicking off Friday. From 4-6 p.m. tonight (and each night thereafter), Japp’s will serve up 33-cent Plymouth gin martinis with a side of live Jazz and ‘20s-‘30s standards. Pet owners have rallied for a downtown dog park for years; now there are two! In addition to Washington Park’s AstroTurfed dog area is Fido Field on Eggleston Ave. The space is made possible my volunteers and fundraising, as it is not managed by the Cincinnati Park Board. Help contribute to the maintenance of Fido Field by enjoying a night out on the Balls Around the Block bar crawl Friday. Dog lovers and drinkers alike will hop from the Contemporary Arts Center (check-in by 6 p.m.) to bars like Igby’s, Righteous Room, Madonna’s and more, enjoying drink and food specials at various locations. Registration for the event has closed; walk-ups will be accepted until 7 p.m. at the CAC for $40. Check out the bar crawl map and learn more about Fido Field here. While there aren’t any new theater productions opening this week, there are plenty of shows to check out at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, Playhouse in the Park and Covington’s Carnegie Center. Read about them in Rick Pender’s Stage Door. Downtown’s newest bar, 601 Lounge and Nightclub, hosts a grand opening Saturday. Doors open at 9 p.m.; $10 cover includes two free drinks. Like a lot of newer downtown clubs, 601 looks to cater to the VIP/bottle service crowd, so dress to impress — or you’ll be stuck in the cold. Check out our calendar  for more events, art shows, concerts, theater productions and more happening this weekend
 
 
by Rick Pender 01.25.2013
Posted In: Theater at 09:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Stage Door: Good vs. Evil

The clash of good and evil seems to be on the mind of most of our local theaters this week as numerous openings bring plenty of offerings for you to choose from.Abigail/1702 at the Cincinnati Playhouse is a kind of sequel to Arthur Miller's The Crucible. This new play by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa (it's actually a world premiere) takes the character of Abigail Williams, the villainous and spiteful catalyst for the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, and moves her 10 years beyond. She's living in Boston, an outcast caring for people afflicted with the "pox" — and haunted by her past. She knows her actions in Salem were evil, perhaps inspired by the Devil himself. How she copes with the current events of her life is very much dictated by her actions from the past. This is a fascinating variation on a familiar character, told with an air of supernatural events and eerie sights and sounds. Box office: 513-421-3888.Freud's Last Session at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati puts a debate about the existence of God front and center, with the distance between good and evil or right and wrong as the battleground. Psychoanalyst and atheist Sigmund Freud is dying of oral cancer; he invites to his London flat a young academic and newly converted Christian, C. S. Lewis (who later wrote the Christian allegory The Chronicles of Narnia). On the September day in 1939 when England declares war on Germany — perhaps another clash of good and evil — they meet for a conversation. The play is almost all talking and very little action, but the clash of ideas is enough to keep you on the edge of your seat. That's made especially true by two fine actors: Bruce Cromer (the Playhouse's longstanding Ebenezer Scrooge and Cincinnati Shakespeare's recent Atticus Finch) as the earnest Lewis, and Barry Mulholland (a local newcomer, but a veteran actor) as the skeptical Freud. This one will make you think. Box office: 513-421-3555.Camelot at Covington's Carnegie Center offers a distilled version of the Broadway hit from 1960. It's presented as a concert, singers backed up by members of the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, led by its maestro Mischa Santora. The story of King Arthur's court, a place of goodness and justice brought down by an illicit love affair, is another glimpse of the good and evil affect history — even if it's mythic history. Former NKU professor Mark Hardy is back in town to play Arthur. Through Feb. 3. Box office: 859-957-1940.The evils of racial injustice are at the heart and soul of the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical Memphis, which has a touring production at the Aronoff through Feb. 3. Set in the 1950s, it's about a white radio DJ who digs black music long before it became mainstream. His love of the music leads him to a romance with a talented singer, and that causes complications in a town where black and white don't mingle without serious repercussions. Of course, it's a musical, so this doesn't dig too deeply into the issues, but it's definitely a reminder of a time and place that feels very foreign to us today — even if some attitudes persist. Ultimately, it's about the power of music to bridge difficult boundaries, and that's a good message. Box: 800-987-2787.
 
 

Giving the Gift of Theater

0 Comments · Tuesday, December 18, 2012
All right, you’re going to have to forgive me — I am a theater critic and a theater lover. Those terms are not mutually exclusive.  

More Than the Sum of the Parts

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 6, 2012
Collaboration is the byword for many arts organizations today, especially theaters where financial support is tough to obtain and ticket revenues are seldom enough to support the cost of productions. By working together, economies can be achieved and, in some cases, multiple constituencies can be activated.  

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