What should I be doing instead of this?
 
WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Cassie Lipp 02.24.2016 69 days ago
Posted In: COMMUNITY, Culture at 04:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
building_value_logo

Slice of Cincinnati: Building Value

Customers entering Building Value in Northside are greeted by a yard of bathtubs, sinks and other home furnishings. It might seem like a graveyard for building materials, but these old home fixtures are awaiting a new life. This is confirmed by the set of child-sized lawn chairs by the store entrance. Upon closer inspection it’s clear that the chairs are actually repurposed shopping carts. Inside, customers bustle around the store through aisles of cabinets, shelves and other furniture looking for a new home. All of the goods available for purchase at Building Value are either donated by homeowners who no longer use them or salvaged from demolished homes. Anything bought here can be given a new life in another home rather than sitting in a landfill. While two men get out a tape measure to see if their dream cabinets will fit inside their kitchen, the store cat Bella Value perches atop the checkout counter as the clerk asks a customer to sign a donation form. “With or without the cat’s help?” he asks. Bella seems indifferent to the man’s signature as he signs off on the goods he donated to the store.“Bella doesn’t actually itemize or give customers value for their stuff,” store manager David Daniels says. “She is on payroll to take care of the mice.” Building Value’s main mission is to employ people with disabilities and other workplace difficulties and give them the training needed to obtain positions in the construction field that pay livable wages. Those who complete Building Value’s training program develop basic deconstruction skills. They may then be hired by companies like Messer Construction, a partner of Building Value. “A combination of our program and our store work hand in hand,” Daniels says. “The deconstruction part tears down buildings and brings it back to the store; the store sells it so that we can make money to fund our mission.” Instead of completely knocking a house to the ground, Building Value works to take it apart piece by piece so that almost all parts are salvageable and able to be resold in the store. All proceeds benefit programs at Easter Seals, a nonprofit dedicated to creating opportunities for those with disabilities or disadvantages to realize their full potential. The tristate chapter of Easter seals founded the store in 2004. “We’re trying to carefully remove items so that it can come here and get a second life as the same thing or maybe repurposed,” Daniels says. “Our biggest component here is how much stuff we divert from the landfill.” The cheapest way to demolish a building is to completely raze it and dump all of the components into a landfill, Daniels says. Although Building Value does not demolish homes this way, having the service done by them may be comparable or cheaper because the items salvaged for resale are tax-deductible donations. “The thing that separates us from another business is that all the material that comes back to the store is an actual tax write-off to the organization that offsets their bill,” Daniels says. Daniels says Building Value will take the bricks, wood floors, windows, staircases, mantles and nearly any other part of a house. Customers could almost build a house from the store’s materials. While this provides a low-cost alternative for customers, it is also ideal for those who own older homes who may not be able to find the parts they need at stores like Home Depot or Lowe’s. Building Value’s inventory is more eclectic because it is sourced from donations and changes every week. The customers who shop at Building Value are contractors, house flippers and those looking to repurpose old items — a group Daniels proudly calls “the Pinterest crowd.” Since the key to making money off these ventures is finding cheap materials, Building Value is an essential shopping destination for these customers. Before Daniels became the store manager, he flipped old houses and was a frequent customer himself. He combines his skills from managing a Walgreens store with his knowledge of what homebuilders need to run Building Value. “[At Walgreens] I was working a lot of hours, but I was never inspired,” he says. “This job inspires me — I come in on my day off every week.” Daniels says rather than working hard to help Walgreens profit, he is now working hard for a better cause. ”This store is a win-win situation,” he says. “The customers win, the company wins, the environment wins. Nobody is getting a bad shake out of this.” For more information on BUILDING VALUE, visit buildingvalue.org.
 
 

Local Designers Participate in Annual Re-Purposing Contest

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 15, 2013
For the past three years, Building Value has included a “designer challenge” element at their ReUse-apalooza fundraiser, which demonstrates the remarkable work that artists and creative types can make out of the materials the nonprofit acquires from various deconstruction jobs, donations and retail recycling projects.  
by Jac Kern 04.27.2012
 
 
steampunk

Your Weekend To Do List: 4/27-4/29

OTR Skate, Cincinnati Opera Gala, Steampunk Symposium, ReUse-apalooza and more

Thanks to the Contemporary Arts Center's current music video exhibition, Spectacle, a number of talented musicians, artists and directors have flocked to Cincinnati during the past two months to perform and discuss the power of music videos in our culture. Tonight, director Vincent Morisset stops by to screen Inni, his powerful black-and-white film about Icelandic Pop Rock group Sigur Rós. Morisset will then discuss his work with Sigur Rós and Arcade Fire and take questions. The event begins at 6:30 — come early to check out the Spectacle exhibit if you haven't yet. The screening and talk are free for members, $7.50 museum admission for non-members.
It's Final Friday and last year's popular monthly OTR Skate is back! Don your best hot pants and tube socks and roll over to the OTR Recreation Center for a night of old-school fun with a hip twist. Bust a move on the rink to the music of Automagik and You, You're Awesome. Admission is just $5 (skate rental included) and goes to the Rec Center to provide youth programs and scholarships for area kids. Enjoy free Vitamin Water and classic game room attractions like air hockey and foosball. Been a decade or two since you last laced up those skates? Cincinnati Rollergirls will be on hand for some pro tips. The fun begins at 8 p.m.
Northside's Building Value presents its third annual ReUse-apalooza tonight from 7-11 p.m. Learn about how the nonprofit reuses materials and what you can do to promote sustainable building practices. Music will be provided by Messerly and Ewing and there will be a silent auction featuring Building Value projects. Tickets are $20, $50 VIP. After the benefit, head over to Northside Tavern for a free after-party.
If you've checked out our cover story this week, you know about the steampunk movement that's taken flight locally. What started as a literary genre that mixes Victorian history with futuristic fantasy elements a la Jules Verne is know an underground culture with its own music, art, costuming and performance aspects. This weekend marks the first Steampunk Symposium at Tri-County's Atrium Hotel. While weekend passes are sold-out, Saturday one-day tickets will be available at the door for $20. Whether you're a diehard steampunk or just curious about the movement, this quirky event has something for everyone. Saturday's schedule includes various steampunk bands and authors, a midnight masquerade, workshops, fashion shows, a mustache parade, verbal dueling (a battle of wits) and dozens of other activities. Various events run from 10 a.m. until around 2 a.m. Read more about the culture and find a Saturday lineup here.May is Bike Month and the Main Library downtown kicks off the cycling celebration Saturday with a bike expo. Check out various bicycle exhibits, meet organizers from groups like MoBo Bicycle Coop, Queen City Bike and League of American Bicyclists and meet Bobbi Montgomery, author of Across America by Bicycle. Get all the information you need to become a regular cyclist about town. The expo runs from 2-4 p.m. Go here for more details.The Cincinnati Opera will perform the highly anticipated Southern-inspired George Gershwin hit Porgy and Bess in June, but you don't have to wait until summer to get in on the excitement. Saturday's Opera Gala, "A Hot Night in Charleston" will transport Duke Energy Convention Center's Grand Ballroom into the Pametto State with soul food, cocktails, music and dancing. After you've had your fill of Southern-style eats, stick around for the after-party, "Late Night in Charleston." Being a benefit for the Opera, tickets for the Gala are pretty steep ($250, $175 for first-timers); If you're on a budget, consider coming for the after-party, which runs from 10 p.m.-1 a.m. — tickets are $30 in advance, $40 at the door. Cocktails and hors d'oeuvres will begin being serves at 6:30 p.m.
Add a little cuteness to your weekend with the Ohio Alleycat Resource & Spay/Neuter Clinic open house Sunday. The facility has been yarn bombed by the Cincinnati BombShells to welcome new cats ready for adoption. If you're looking for a new cuddle buddy, consider adopting one of OAR's rescue kitties at the event. The free open house runs 1-4 p.m. Go here for more details, directions and more info on donations and volunteer opportunities.For more art exhibits, theater shows events and concerts, check out our To Do page and music blog.
 
 

0|1
 
Close
Close
Close