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High Setlist Hopes

What Springsteen should play at his Cincinnati tour stop

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 1, 2014
In light of reports from shows in Australia and New Zealand (and with a heavy dose of wishful thinking), here are some suggestions for Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band's set at their tour stop in Cincinnati.   

Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes

Oct. 5 • Bogart's

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 1, 2013
 Bruce Springsteen is the anointed Boss of the anthemic Jersey Shore sound, but when Jon Bon Jovi credits the guy who inspired him to sing like his life depended on it, he cites Southside Johnny as his primary muse. That’s a potent endorsement.   

Bruce

By Peter Ames Carlin

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Less than a year ago, word began circulating of a new “definitive” biography of Rock and Roll icon Bruce Springsteen. These rumors were like manna from heaven for frustrated Springsteen fans, who have been waiting for decades for this kind of biography. And who could blame them?  

Springsteen Goes Long, Eternal Skrillex and Olympic Disses

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 8, 2012
Springsteen breaks own "longest concert" record, Skrillex fans never have to be without him and Morrissey and Mitt Romney have something in common — they are unimpressed by the London Olympics.  

Bunbury Rocks, Def Lep Rewinds and Macca/Boss Cut Short

0 Comments · Wednesday, July 18, 2012
The first ever Bunbury Music Festival draws tens of thousands to Cincinnati's riverfront for three days of great times and even better music. Plus, Joe Elliott says Def Leppard will be joining iTunes soon finally — after the band re-records all of its old songs so they can receive all the profits — and one of the jerks responsible for pulling the plug on Bruce Springsteen/Paul McCartney defends the decision and jerkishly says it "added legend to the myth."  
by Mike Breen 04.02.2012
Posted In: Music History at 10:54 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
103edwinstarr

This Date in Music History: April 2

"War" singer passes away and Zeebra helps popularize Hip Hop in Japan

On this day in 2003, the singer of one of the best known anti-war protest songs, "War," died from a heart attack at his home in England. Born in Nashville and raised in Cleveland, Edwin Starr (born Charles Hatcher) moved to Detroit in the ’60s and eventually started recording for Motown. In 1968, he had his first big hit, "Twenty-Five Miles," but two years later he'd release a song originally recorded by The Temptations (and written by genius songwriting team Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong) that would become his signature.Motown wasn't keen on letting The Temptations release "War" — a very obvious protest number ("War, what is it good for? Absolutely nothin' ") aimed at the Vietnam War — out of fear that it would alienate the group's fans, so Starr recorded it, giving it a more intense delivery, and it went to No. 1 upon its release in the summer of 1970, where it stayed for three weeks. Starr embraced his role as outspoken anti-war critic and released the single "Stop the War Now" in 1971 (it was yet another song also recorded by The Temptations, who clearly had dibs on material). Starr ultimately left Motown, tiring of the more formulaic material they were producing, and moved to the U.K. He recorded several songs with the British group, Utah Saints, including a new version of "War" in 2003, which became his final recorded output. Bruce Springsteen repopularized the song when he performed it towards the end of his Born in the U.S.A. tour. The Boss' version was released as a live single in 1986 and made it to No. 8 on the Billboard singles chart. (Oh, and also in the ’80s, Frankie Goes to Hollywood covered it, though I think just so Holly Johnson could reprise his "Hunnhhhh!" shout from "Relax.")The Temptations did release a slightly less direct song with societal commentary in 1970 that made it to No. 3, the superb "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)."Click on for Born This Day featuring Serge Gainsbourg, Marvin Gaye, Dr. Demento and Zeebra.

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by Mike Breen 02.23.2012
Posted In: Music History, Music Commentary at 11:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
woody_guthrie_nywts

This Date in Music History: Feb. 23

'This Land Is Your Land' turns 72 and Aziz Ansari turns Kanye jokes into an artform

On this day in 1940, American music icon Woody Guthrie wrote his most famous song and one that has become embedded into the DNA of American life, "This Land is You Land." The Folk music legend and notorious fighter for the social causes of the poor and working class is said to have written the song after hearing (a few too many times) Irving Berlin's "God Bless America," which he felt was too hyperbolic. Just like Roxanne Shante's "The Real Roxanne" was written as a response to U.T.F.O.'s "Roxanne Roxanne" (OK, maybe not JUST like), "This Land" was Guthrie's "answer song." Guthrie recorded the future standard five years later, but it wasn't until the ’60s Folk revival that the song really took flight, as everyone from Bob Dylan to The Kingston Trio covered the tune. Though "God Bless America" may be the song still sung at baseball games, "This Land is You Land" has endured as one of the greatest pieces of American art, a reflection of what many of us believe our country is all about — "We're all in this together and lucky to be on this wonderful little chunk of dirt, so shut up and quit being so selfish, jerk-ass!" Or something along those lines (maybe I read too much into it). The song is still common at protests and used in political contexts. Bruce Springsteen closed his acoustic concerts in support of Barrack Obama in 2008 with a version ("Yes We Can" chants added), while Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello serenaded the mass of humanity at the Occupy Wall Street protest in NYC with the song (lost verses and all) this past October. Here is one of the great "contemporary" versions — a rendition by Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, who give the song a sweet vintage Soul makeover:Click the jump for "Born This Day" featuring Aziz Ansari, the Mark Twain of Kanye West jokes.

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by Mike Breen 02.08.2012
Posted In: Music Commentary at 01:06 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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The Politics of Inappropriate Campaign Songs

Why do conservatives keeping using campaign music by liberal artists?

There have been an increasing number of examples — especially in the past decade — of conservative politicians using songs in their campaigns by artists who do not want their music used in that way. Recently, a member of Survivor who owns the copyright for the Rocky III anthem, "Eye of the Tiger," asked Newt Gingrich to stop using the song at rallies (the problem being that not only is the song being used in public, but it also ends up soundtracking YouTube clips from the same rally and lives on eternally on the web). Likewise, British Funk/Rock band The Heavy freaked when Newt's people blared their "How You Like Me Now?" hit to rile up supporters. It almost seems like these occurrences happen on a weekly basis now. Usually, when asked to cease use, the politicians' campaigns comply immediately. But, with it happening so frequently, wouldn't a campaign manager be a little more aware of the music they're deciding to co-opt? And if a campaign refuses, are there really any legal ramifications?

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by Mike Breen 10.27.2011
Posted In: Live Music, Music News at 10:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
10502

Squeeze the Day for 10/27

Sebadoh, Seedy George Jones, Kenny Wayne Shepherd and SSLYBY, plus This Day in Music

Music Tonight: Nineties Indie Rock stalwarts Sebadoh bring their "Bakesale/Harmacy Remembering Time Tour" to Newport's Southgate House tonight. The tour is in honor of the recent reissues of the 1994 and 1996 albums in the tour title. Our Jason Gargano spoke to Sebadoh main-man Lou Barlow for this week's CityBeat and some of Barlow's comments about the quality of music in the ’90s have caused a minor uproar with some of our readers (and Lou himself has even politely chimed in; check the comments). Of the ’90s, a typically blunt Barlow said (and it should be noted he laughed often while saying this), “To me the ’90s were one of the worst periods in music — easily, hands down.

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Bruce Springsteen, The Grammys and Coldplay

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 13, 2011
If you were attending an esteemed university and ready to enter the job market, what would you do if some of your fellow students pulled a stunt that made your school a national laughing stock? If it’s New Jersey’s Rutgers and the stunt is paying a flash-in-the-pan reality TV star a shit-ton to speak on campus, you reach out to The Boss.  

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