WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Brian Baker 03.02.2012
Posted In: Reviews at 01:59 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
goflyakite

Review: Ben Kweller - 'Go Fly a Kite'

In a discussion of lives spent making music, Ben Kweller’s name has to warrant a prominent mention. His father, a doctor who counted Nils Lofgren as a friend and former neighbor, taught Kweller how to play drums at age 8, which led to his first band, Radish, at 12, his first major label contract at 16, appearances on Conan O’Brien and David Letterman at 17 and the launch of his solo career at 19. Since then, Kweller has released a quartet of acclaimed albums, collaborated with Ben Folds and Ben Lee (as The Bens, naturally) and Guster and toured with Evan Dando, Juliana Hatfield, Jeff Tweedy and Faith No More, among many others, a testament to Kweller’s musical adaptability and diverse appeal.Kweller was talking about his fifth album, Go Fly a Kite, as long ago as fall 2010, describing it as nearly finished and ready to go. But a break from his longtime label, Dave Matthews’ ATO Records, caused Kweller to rethink Kite’s release date, pushing it close to a year beyond his original timing. Kweller must have used the time to set up his own label, Noise Company, because Go Fly a Kite sounds exactly as he outlined it a year and a half ago, namely a stripped down Power Pop/electric Folk hybrid that channels his early direction and perhaps signposts where he’s heading down the line. Like Matthew Sweet or Fountains of Wayne, Kweller possesses an uncanny knack for setting relatively serious subjects to an infectiously catchy soundtrack. Kite is loaded with that bittersweet Pop ethic, particularly on simple but effective Pop/Rock fist pumpers like “Mean to Me” and the punchy “Justify Me.” Kweller’s early schooling in The Beatles and Hollies is woven into Kite’s 11 tracks, from the powerfully angsty “Jealous Girl” to the piano balladry and lilting orchestration of “The Rainbow,” but at the same time, he’s fully aware of his own creative identity and never gets lost in the forest of his influences.
 
 

Ben Kweller, The Von Bondies, Roger Manning and More

0 Comments · Monday, February 9, 2009
So I finally picked up the new Bruce Springsteen but haven't had a chance to spin it yet. And I'm hot to hear the new Heartless Bastards, but maybe I'll wait until the hoopla dies down and give it a review based on a little perspective. So what does that leave us with in the present tense? Quite a lot actually: new CDs from Ben Kweller, The Von Bondies, Roger Manning and Ladyfinger, plus a 1973 classic from British singer/songwriter John Martyn.   

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