WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
 
by Jac Kern 01.15.2013
Posted In: Fashion, TV/Celebrity, Movies at 03:12 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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I Just Can't Get Enough...Golden Globes

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Tina Fey and Amy Poehler hosted the 70th annual Golden Globe Awards Sunday, making the three-hour event pretty much bearable! Some awards were pretty predictable (Les Mis) while others were surprising (Girls) but T&A — I’m coining their celebrity couple name — kept the show fun by teasing Hollywood greats and each other. The first awards of the night went to Christoph Waltz, Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture, Drama for Django Unchained; Maggie Smith, Best Supporting Actress – TV for Downton Abbey; and Julianne Moore, Best Actress – Miniseries/TV Movie for Game Change, which also was awarded Best Miniseries/TV Movie. Now, I think we can all lay to rest the Sarah Palin impersonation. May we never seek its comedic relief again. Keeping everyone on their toes, T&A randomly planted themselves, in disguises, in the audience as the camera panned to nominees: Next up, Homeland started to sweep the evening, nabbing Best TV Series – Drama, Best Actor (Damian Lewis) and Best Actress (Claire Danes) in the category. Danes thanked her recently born son, with whom she was pregnant while filming some of this season's craziest scenes. Cute, but she really should have named that kid Saul, right? As Michael Bloomberg said, white people love them some Homeland. Mychael Danna was awarded with Best Original Score for Life of Pi and Adele, finally out of maternal hiding, won a much-deserved Globe for Best Original Score for the eponymous hit from Skyfall. Taylor Swift was not impressed. JLo showed up looking like a slutty Queen Frostine in a what appeared to be a body paint ensemble to award Best Actor – Miniseries/TV Movie (Hatfields & McCoys) to a very boring Kevin Costner. So what do you do when half the crowd is drunk and the show starts getting boring? Bring out Bill Clinton! Willie bit his lip, thumbs upped a few times and introduced Lincoln (once everyone stopped throwing their panties onstage at him). Not missing a beat, Poehler came out, awestruck, and proclaimed, “That was Hillary Clinton’s husband!” Sa-woon. Then out come Will Ferrell and Kristin Wiig (looking foine as ever), giggling like a couple stoned teenagers, pretending to not have seen a single film in their category (Best Actress – Motion Picture, Comedy/Musical). JLaw got the prize for her role in Silver Linings Playbook, wearing what may become a major spring 2013 fashion trend: boob origami. Lawrence seems like a real human, and funny to boot. She'll be hosting Saturday Night Live this weekend. Ed Harris won Best Support Actor – TV for his role as John McCain in Game Change. Anne Hathaway dreamed a dream about winning Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture…and it came true (Sorry, that was pretty bad). Though I did not care for her 1994 mother of the bride look. Best Screenplay went to Quentin “Don’t ask me about violence” Tarantino for Django Unchained. In a pretty surprising turn, Don Cheadle, who is awesome, won Best Actor – TV, Comedy/Musical for House of Lies, which is really not that awesome. Louie C.K. was robbed. Everyone took a little nap as Best Foreign Language Film was announced (Amour) because ENGLISH. And Brave won Best Animated Feature Film (Side note: Go watch that shit with your mom and be prepared for sobbing and family bonding). The Best Actress – TV, Comedy/Musical category was full of badass ladies, including the two hosts. Tina awaited the results with new BFF Jennifer Lopez While Amy cozied up with her new beau. Eat it, Will Arnett! But — Surprise! — it was Lena Dunham who napped the award for her role in Girls. T&A promptly poked fun at Dunham’s speech, gave a losers toast, and called out a very drunk Glenn Close. Then, things turn a turn for the…weird. Jodie Foster was honored with the Cecil B. DeMille Award, presented by Robert Downey, Jr. In her speech (the one that they actually could have cut off but didn't), Foster hopped back and forth between trying to make jokes and some genuine, serious points, making the whole thing a little hard to follow. On one hand, I can understand why some people are confused as to why, if she was going to address her personal life anyway, she wouldn’t just come out with a declarative statement about being gay. It’s important for people to see strong, positive public figures who happen to be homosexual, especially children who feel different, ostracized or unloved because of who they are. I get that. But Miss Jodie had some points in that cloudy ramble of a speech. As a celebrity who works hard to keep her life off-screen private, why should she be pressed to make some kind of grand statement, especially since she has already come out to those who know her personally? “Coming outs” can certainly be positive these days, but they’re also an invitation for attention and publicity, which she personally does not want. In her own words “I am not Honey Boo Boo Child.” For the final awards of the night, Ben Affleck won Best Director for Argo; Girls won Best TV Series – Comedy/Musical; Hugh Jackman nabbed Best Actor for Les Miserables, the same film awarded for Best Comedy/Musical; Jessica Chastain, who’s appeared in 10 films since 2011, won Best Actress for Zero Dark Thirty; Daniel “Human Chameleon” Day-Lewis shocked no one when he won Best Actor for Lincoln; and Best Film in the Drama category went to Argo. Whew. That was a lot to take in, wasn’t it, Mel?
 
 

The Town (Review)

Ben Affleck is one smooth criminal

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 14, 2010
Boston native Ben Affleck takes us into the city's capital of sorts for criminal activity, Charlestown, where a life of crime is a vocation. Co-writing, acting, directing ... there's not a job in 'The Town' that he can't do and do well. And there's not a weak performance in the entire cast, which isn't exactly surprising considering the collection of talent. Grade: A-.  

Extract (Review)

Mike Judge's big-screen return yields mixed results

0 Comments · Friday, September 4, 2009
As prolific as writer/director Mike Judge has been throughout a stellar career that includes such television staples as 'Beavis and Butt-Head' and 'King of the Hill' and cult films as 'Office Space' and 'Idiocracy,' it's to his detriment (and ours) that he hasn't done more feature films. The tone of 'Extract' is spot-on, but unfortunately Judge never manages to bring the humor to a boil. Grade: B-.  

State of Play (Review)

Pedantic thriller is caught in its own obvious clockwork

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 15, 2009
Based on a politically charged BBC miniseries, 'State of Play' moves the action from the House of Parliament to Washington, D.C., where the suspicious death of a congressman's co-worker mistress underlines the desperate state of newspaper journalism in America. Russell Crowe, looking considerably older these days, plays Cal McAffrey, a veteran Washington Post-styled reporter with close ties to the congressman. Grade: C.  

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