CityBeat Blogs - Arts <![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (11/20-11/24)]]> FRIDAY


You’ve seen the Emmy-nominated show; now you can live it. The hosts of MythBusters will be wishing co-host and frequently bereted Jamie Hyneman farewell on a nationwide tour, and they need your help to conduct some of their final experiments when they make their stop in Cincinnati. Attendees will be brought on stage to assist Jamie and Adam as they use science to bust popular myths and misconceptions. 8 p.m. Friday. $45-$110. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown,

“Untitled (Antelope)” by Jochen Lempert
Photo: courtesy of the artist and ProjecteSD Barcelona
Jochen Lempert, the German photographer whose first major U.S. museum show, Field Guide, is now at the Cincinnati Art Museum, combines the metaphysical with the biological so well that the effect is often magical. Or, I should say, the effect is downright scientific. He’d appreciate that latter term — he’s a trained biologist who turned to art photography in the 1990s. Yet much of his work achieves magic by making something ephemeral concrete and vice versa. This is a show to spend some time with, because the way individual images affect the viewer often depends on the size and placement of the black-and-white prints. And the impact upon our cognitive process of seeing, in close proximity to each other, close-ups of sand (“Etruscan Sand,” a 2009 photogram), “Rain” (a 2003 photograph) and “Crushed Shells” (a 2013 photogram) teaches us as much about ourselves as photography. Read more about the exhibit here. Jochen Lempert’s Field Guide is on display at the CAM until March 6. More info:

'Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie'
Photo: Joe Wardwell
The Weston Art Gallery hosts an opening reception for Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie, an exhibition organized by artist and sometimes-curator Todd Pavlisko. Gimmie will examine “the varied experience of amassing objects and the practice of collecting” by featuring installation work by artists Antonio Adams and Alfred Steiner, as well as iconic works by world-renowned artists including Vito Acconci, Chris Burden, Ana Mendieta and Adrian Piper. Opening reception: 6-8 p.m. Friday. Through Jan. 17. Free. 650 Walnut St., Downtown,

Photo: Provided
Peruse one-of-a-kind gifts for the holidays (or just because) at C-LINK Gallery’s annual SHOP: Cincinnati exhibition. Beginning Friday, the gallery inside Brazee Street Studios will showcase a treasure trove of handmade items crafted by local artists, including everything from jewelry, ceramics and ornaments to greeting cards, paintings and more. Get started 6-9 p.m. Friday at the first of two free receptions. Through Dec. 26. Prices vary. C-LINK Gallery, 4426 Brazee St., Oakley,

'As You Like It'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
Who knew cross-dressing could be such fun? Apparently Shakespeare did. All the actors on the Elizabethan stage were men, so having Rosalind dress as a man while hiding in the Forest of Arden was a kind of double-down trick. While disguised, she finds the forest’s trees covered with love poems about her “real” self. What’s a girl to do? That’s what As You Like It is about. One of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies, it’s a good-natured choice for the holidays. Audience favorite Sara Clark will play Rosalind; she excels with verbal comedy, so be prepared to laugh. Through Dec. 12. $22-$39. Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, 719 Race St., Downtown, 513-381-2273,

A fundraiser for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund. This benefit coincides with National Diabetes Awareness Month, and activities include food pairings, bourbon tastings, a photobooth, silent auction and a live bow-tie experience auction. 7-11 p.m. $35 with bourbon tasting. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-793-3223.

A dance party where German costumes are encouraged. 8 p.m. Christian Moerlein Brewing Co., 1621 Moore St., Downtown,

Festival of Lights
Photo: Cincinnati Zoo
It’s that time of year again — more than 2 million sparkling lights illuminate the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, transforming its exhibits and landscape into an exuberant “Wild Wonderland.” New in 2015 are a Wild Lights Show on Swan Lake and a Frozen-themed area where guests can meet Anna and Elsa. Other festival features include visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus, the Toyland Express Train Ride and a black-light show by Madcap Puppets. Remember to stop by the Holiday Post Office and the newly themed Gingerbread Village, where you can peek through the windows of each house to find the mouse that lives inside. Through Jan. 2. $27 adults; $21 seniors/children. 3400 Vine St., Avondale, 513-281-4700,

Victory of Light Expo
Photo: Provided
This psychic festival has been Cincinnati’s premier body, mind and spirit event for more than 20 years. With 79 seminars and more than 250 exhibitors, it’s the best opportunity for exploring alternative spirituality in the Midwest. Seminars feature dozens of experts as they speak about dreams, past lives, meditation, tarot, astrology and more. Other activities include holistic healing sessions, live music, book signings, psychic artists, aura photography and shopping. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $15 daily; $25 weekend. Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Sharonville,

Black Dance is Beautiful
Photo: Provided
Help arts advocate and People’s Liberty Project Grant recipient Quiera Levy-Smith celebrate the Black Dance is Beautiful festival during a free performance featuring African-American choreographers and dancers from four companies. Included are two groups from Cincinnati: Bi-Okoto Drum & Dance Theatre, directed by Adebola T. Olowe, Sr., and Studio Kre8v, the Hip Hop dance team of urban arts center Elementz. From Columbus comes dynamic all-male company Berry & Nance (pictured). Rounding out the bill is Terence Greene’s Cleveland-based Greene Works Project. Cincinnati Ballet soloist James Gilmer also performs. 7 p.m. Saturday. Free with registration on the website or at the door beginning at 6:15 p.m. Walnut Hills High School, 3250 Victory Parkway, Walnut Hills,

Embark on bar and restaurant group 4EG’s Mustache Ball Crawl on Saturday to benefit the Testicular Cancer Society and Midwest Rugby Development Foundation. The bar crawl kicks off with free appetizers at event presenter The Sandbar; then, head to Mt. Adams Pavilion, The Righteous Room, Igby’s and O’Malleys. Ticket price includes round-trip transportation and drink specials, including $2.50 domestic beers and $2 off drafts, at all participating locations. 8 p.m. Saturday. $30. Begins at The Sandbar, 4609 Kellogg Ave., California,  

'A Little Bird Told Me'
Photo: Sara Pearce
Twelve well-regarded Cincinnati artists and artisans have banded together for a Studio Collection Holiday Sale Saturday. Judy Dominic, Jennifer Gleason, Renee Harris, Lisa Inglert, Terri Kern, Pam Korte, Mary Mark, Sara Pearce, Margaret Rhein, Melinda Ramos, Ursula Roma and Pat Statzer will be offering everything from ceramics, painting and prints to handmade condiments, hand-dyed clothing and handmade jewelry. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Free. Harmony Lodge, 646 E. Epworth Ave., Spring Grove Village,

Will Kimbrough
If there’s one phrase that Will Kimbrough’s family and friends don’t use in conversation with the renowned Roots/Rock singer/songwriter, it would have to be, “When you have some spare time..." The concept of unused hours in a day has to be fairly foreign to Kimbrough, who generally maintains a schedule that would exhaust three burly roadies. Kimbrough’s docket is routinely packed with studio session work, touring gigs and production projects (for the likes of Jimmy Buffett, Todd Snider, Rodney Crowell, Steve Earle, Guy Clark and a host of other luminaries), as well as his various band/solo activities, the latter of which now includes Daddy, his group with fellow singer/songwriter Tommy Womack, and the minor supergroup Willie Sugarcapps, which also features singer/songwriter Grayson Capps and the members of the Folk duo Sugarcane Jane. Read more about Kimbrough in this week's Sound Advice. Will Kimbrough performs Saturday at Southgate House Revival. More info/tickets:

'The Art of the Brick'
Photo: Cincinnati Museum Center
Millions of LEGO bricks are taking over the Cincinnati Museum Center. Anticipated exhibit The Art of the Brick features more than 100 artworks created by contemporary artist Nathan Sawaya using nothing other than LEGOs. Explore life-size human figures, a 20-foot-long T-Rex skeleton and replicated famous paintings, including “Starry Night” and “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” plus familiar sculptures like “The Thinker” and the Sphinx. Sawaya has also created a Cincinnati-themed piece that will be revealed when the exhibit debuts. Create your own LEGO masterpieces in the interactive Brickopolis, and don’t miss special themed days revolving around Star Wars, dinosaurs, superheroes and more. Through May 1. $19.50 adults; $12.50 children 12 and under. Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, 513-287-7000,

Fountain Square Ice Rink
Photo: Provided
Fountain Square’s Ice Rink is officially open, offering daily skating and special events (like frozen-turkey bowling Nov. 24) all the way through February. Rent a pair of skates on-site and spend the day in the heart of downtown. Open daily. $6 admission; $4 skate rental. Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown,

Poinsettia Express at Krohn Conservatory
Photo: Gary Kessler
Take a walk through a winter wonderland at Krohn Conservatory. The conservatory’s holiday floral show, Poinsettia Express, takes visitors through a charming array of floral arrangements whose colors resemble candy canes as toy trains carry peppermints through a village of gingerbread houses. In the Schmalz Family Holiday Village, see motionettes from the 1940s and ’50s Shillito’s and Pogues display windows, Santa music boxes, a 12-foot Christmas tree and even a model of a town inspired by A Christmas Carol. Through Jan. 3; special evening hours 5-7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 and Dec. 16-23. $7 adults; $4 children. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park,

Bill Nye
Photo: Provided
Bill Nye, the quintessential science guy and public defender of evolution, discusses his latest book, Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World, at the main branch of the public library. Unstoppable combines optimism and scientific curiosity to examine today’s environmental issues, positing that global warming isn’t an insurmountable problem but a chance for our society to rise to the challenge to create a cleaner, healthier and smarter world. Nye also debunks some of the most persistent myths about our current environmental issues. 7 p.m. Sunday. Free; tickets to signing line sold out. Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Main Branch, 800 Vine St., Downtown,

A rare public screening of Homebodies, a “lost” movie filmed in Cincinnati’s West End and released in 1974, will take place Sunday at the main library. The film by Larry Yust is a very dark comedy about some desperate pensioners who, when their apartment building is targeted for demolition as part of urban renewal, resist by trying to kill all those who want to move them out. After the screening, there will be a panel discussion with former Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory, librarian Christopher Smith (who has researched the film’s locations) and two police officers assigned to the Homebodies detail, Howard Nichols and Tom McAlpin. 2 p.m. Sunday. Free. Huenefeld Tower Room, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Main Branch, 800 Vine St., Downtown,

Photo: Martine Carlson
What do Caribou, of Montreal, Born Ruffians, Eleanor Friedberger and Yeasayer have in common? Besides a propensity for edgy Electro Pop, they’ve all collaborated with Ahmed Gallab —better known as Sinkane — to add a unique spice to their musical recipes. In his solo career, Sinkane combines several connected yet disparate genre elements — Funk, Afropop, Soul, Jazz, Psychedelia, Krautrock — creating a silky, sensual sonic experience that seeps into your pores like a healing balm while simultaneously inspiring you to dance with dervish-like intensity. Read more about Sinkane in this week's Sound Advice. See Sinkane with Steven A. Clark Sunday at MOTR Pub. More info/tickets:

Drew Hastings
Photo: Provided 
Drew Hastings is a stand-up comic, entrepreneur and the newly re-elected mayor of Hillsboro, Ohio. He was impressed with how voters responded to Issue 3. “I’m glad people who support legalization weren’t like ‘pot at any cost,’ ” he says, referring to the proposed monopoly system the law would have created. “I was saying a lot of the pot lobbyists are having meetings behind closed doors with rolled-up towels at the bottom of them. It’s ironic it was called a marijuana initiative, because I’ve found that initiative is the one thing marijuana knocks out of you.” As for his shows at Go Bananas this week, Hastings says, “You can expect a lot of political incorrectness.” Thursday-Sunday. $12-$18. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery,

St. Anthony of Padua hosts a festival featuring the food and culture of Lebanon. Enjoy falafel, kibbee, stuffed grape leaves while listening to live Middle Eastern music and watching traditional dances. Noon-6 p.m. Free admission. St. Anthony of Padua Church, 2530 Victory Parkway, East Walnut Hills,

If you hate Mondays but love lasagna, you may be a human (or a fat orange cat?). Please/chef Ryan Santos and The Pharmacy Co have teamed up to present I Hate Mondays, a lasagna night pop-up dinner. This monthly Monday night event will feature a vegetarian and traditional meat lasagna with a guest lasagna from a chef — this month it’s Wright. BYOB. First come, first served. 7 p.m. $8-$12. The Pharmacy Co., 18 W. Seventh St., Third Floor, Pendleton,


Taft's Ale House
Photo: Jesse Fox

Taft’s Ale House and Maverick Chocolate Co. join forces for a pre-Thanksgiving dinner. Seating is very limited for this four-course meal, paired with Taft beer and Maverick chocolate. 6:30 p.m. $50. Taft’s Ale House, 1429 Race St., Downtown, 513-334-1393.

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (11/13-11/15)]]> FRIDAY


“Fourth of July,” the centerpiece of Sufjan Stevens’ latest album — the stripped-down, Elliott Smith-esque Carrie & Lowell — is as intimate and revealing as anything in the crafty singer/songwriter’s songbook. It’s about Stevens’ long-estranged mother, the “Carrie” from the album’s title, who died of stomach cancer in 2012. Spare and moody, “Fourth of July” floats by like an almost surreal dream, as minimal keyboard atmospherics and Stevens’ hushed voice relay what it was like to sit at his mother’s death bed, culminating with the repeated phrase, “We’re all gonna die.” Read more about Stevens in this week's Sound Advice. Sufjan Stevens performs with Gallant Friday at the Aronoff Center. More info/tickets:

'Gazelle: The Love Issue'
Photo: Provided
Since its inception four years ago, OutReels Cincinnati has pursued a mission to showcase LGBTQ issues through lectures and film. Presented by the Cincinnati Film Society, the festival returns to the Tristate this weekend with more than 20 short and feature films from around the world, screened over three days at the Aronoff Center. Among the productions are Gazelle: The Love Issue (pictured), a film about loss and personal creative expression, and Upstairs Inferno: The Documentary, which profiles the arson of a New Orlean’s gay bar in 1973 — the largest gay mass murder in U.S. history. Continue the discussion 10:30 a.m. Sunday at 21c Museum Hotel over brunch with members of the OutReels committee (reservations required). Find the full schedule at Friday-Sunday. $12.25 single ticket; $62.25 VIP pass. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-621-ARTS,

Jungle Jim's International Wine Festival
Photo: Provided
Wine and dine at Jungle Jim’s International Wine Festival. More than 90 wineries from across globe — including California, Italy, Spain, New Zealand and South America — will be pouring 400 wines, all available for tasting. Live music sets the mood, and each country pairs food tastings with the wines offered. General tickets include tastings, a commemorative glass, food and live music. Connoisseur tickets provide an additional tasting experience with an international dinner-by-the-bite and open bar. 7-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $25 driver; $65 grand tasting; $125 connoisseur. 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield,

Maya Angelou accompanied the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in November 2013.
Photo: Provided by Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra
We expect the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra to perform great music that will entertain and inspire audiences. But this weekend’s concerts are the culmination of an annual project that goes well beyond the presentation of Classical music: One City, One Symphony is a collaborative initiative using music to bring together citizens from across the Tristate. Since 2012, the CSO has collaborated annually with community organizations for preparatory events that will crescendo with concerts at Music Hall on Friday morning and Saturday evening. Read a full feature on the concerts here. One City, One Symphony takes place Friday and Saturday at Music Hall. Tickets/more info:

Performance and Time Arts
Photo: Monica Furr
Cincinnati-based choreographer and dancer Diana L. Ford produces the newest Performance and Time Arts (PTA) show, sponsored by the Contemporary Dance Theater. On the bill are excerpts from Ford’s “Welcome to America: There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This Crap,” and segments from locals Regina Ford-Fowler, Ivy Pea, Robin Alicia-Clare Hoskins, Pamela Carter Pitts, Jeremy Reneau, Heru Lasana, Isabelle Provosty and Elissa Yancey in conjunction with LaMonica Sherman and the Winton Terrace Sister Circle — a diverse selection of artists, including poets, spoken-word performers, choreographers, dancers, visual artists and rappers — all focusing on social change and justice. In short, a typical outing for PTA. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $12-$15. College Hill Town Hall, 1805 Larch Avenue, College Hill, 513-591-1222,  

Greater Cincinnati Holiday Market
Photo: Provided
Get all your Christmas shopping done early at the Greater Cincinnati Holiday Market. Artists, boutiques and specialty stores from Cincinnati and beyond gather to sell their best holiday goods, flea-market style. This three-day event showcases homemade jewelry, food and accessories, as well as specialty clothing, household goods and kitchenwares. Check out cooking demonstrations at the Specialty Food & Treats show, and don’t forget to get a picture with Santa. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $9; free for children. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown,

Kyle Grooms
Photo: Provided
Comedian Kyle Grooms spends quite a bit of time in Miami, where he once worked in television — he has a semi-regular gig there, but mostly headlines clubs across the country. Comedy fans might recognize him from his work on Chappelle’s Show or from his Comedy Central Presents special. “People judge you just because of how you look,” he tells an audience. “I didn’t know that was serious until I started wearing glasses. People started saying I looked smart. Huh? I ain’t smart, I can’t see! I didn’t go to Harvard, I went to LensCrafters.” Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery,

'Low Down Dirty Blues'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
In an after-hours jam session at a Blues club in Chicago late on a Saturday night easing over into early Sunday, musicians and singers are swapping stories and songs. And those songs are bawdy ballads from the likes of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Big Mama Thornton and more. The cast includes Felicia P. Fields, a Tony-nominated actress for The Color Purple, as the proprietor of the club. Created by the guys who assembled several past Playhouse hits including Hank Williams: Lost Highway and Love, Janis, this show is here for the holidays, so get ready for some low-down, dirty fun. Through Dec. 20. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888,

Tap & Screw’s TapFest features 10 locally homebrewed beers from the concluded 27th-annual local Bloatarian Brewing League Beer & Sweat homebrewing competition. At 5 p.m., an expert panel will award one of the finalists with the Judges Prize, which includes a brewery upgrade kit that will greatly enhance the brewer’s ability to replicate their award-winning beer recipe. Attendees will also have their voices heard when they decide the People’s Choice Award winner. 11 a.m.-2:30 a.m. Saturday. $15. 5060 Crookshank Road, Westwood,

The Mowgli's
Photo: Republic Records
The Mowgli’s follow the tradition of bands that start out by building a strong grassroots audience organically through touring and word-of-mouth, ultimately leading to broader mainstream success (think The Lumineers, Mumford & Sons or Dave Matthews Band). With an irresistible blend of Indie Rock, hyper-melodic Pop, hippie-tinged Folk and occasional splashes of Reggae and Hip Hop, The Mowgli’s sprinkle their infectious soundtrack with a potent message of positivity and hope. At their most exuberant, The Mowgli’s pound out fist-pumping anthems that preach love and its philosophical cousins (optimism, tolerance, brotherhood), but even at their most introspective, the California septet still firmly maintains a optimistic perspective. This viewpoint is not a trendy bumper-sticker aphorism, but a concrete mission statement — the band’s “Be a Mowgli” website and Instagram account encourage followers to spread goodwill and kindness. Read more about the Mowgli's in this week's Sound Advice. See The Mowgli's with Lights and Phases Saturday at the Thompson House. More info/tickets:

Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers
Photo: Provided
Appalachian music is famous for its high, lonesome sound, eerie harmonies and themes of doomed love, faith and longing for the wild beauty of a region extending from Southern New York down into Georgia and Mississippi. When it came to planning a concert that featured traditional and new Appalachian sounds, MUSE, Cincinnati’s Women’s Choir, turned to the legendary Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers, one of the few all-women Bluegrass bands in the region — or anywhere else. Each member brings outsize talent and years of experience: Ma Crow on guitar and lead vocals, Trina Emig on banjo and mandolin, Margie Drees on fiddle and vocals and Vicki Abbott on upright bass and vocals. Valleys Rivers Mountains: Our Life’s Journey is the concert title — one that has special resonance for Crow, who last performed with MUSE in 2002. Read more about Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers here. Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers perform with MUSE Saturday at Northern Kentucky University’s Greaves Hall and Sunday at St. Anthony Parish in Madisonville. Tickets:

Photo: Provided
Peruse one-of-a-kind gifts for the holidays (or just because) at C-LINK Gallery’s annual SHOP: Cincinnati exhibition. Beginning Friday, the gallery inside Brazee Street Studios will showcase a treasure trove of handmade items crafted by local artists, including everything from jewelry, ceramics and ornaments to greeting cards, paintings and more. Get started 6-9 p.m. Friday at the first of two free receptions. Through Dec. 26. Prices vary. C-LINK Gallery, 4426 Brazee St., Oakley,

Top area restaurants head to the Newport Aquarium to serve up dinner-by-the-bite, and sample craft beer, wine, spirits and cocktails from The Party Source. Benefits the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. 7:30-11 p.m. $125. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Poinsettia Express at Krohn Conservatory
Photo: Gary Kessler
Take a walk through a winter wonderland at Krohn Conservatory. The conservatory’s holiday floral show, Poinsettia Express, takes visitors through a charming array of floral arrangements whose colors resemble candy canes as toy trains carry peppermints through a village of gingerbread houses. In the Schmalz Family Holiday Village, see motionettes from the 1940s and ’50s Shillito’s and Pogues display windows, Santa music boxes, a 12-foot Christmas tree and even a model of a town inspired by A Christmas Carol. Through Jan. 3; special evening hours 5-7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 and Dec. 16-23. $7 adults; $4 children. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park,

Ice Rink at Fountain Square
Photo: Provided
Temperatures may be in the 70s this week, but that doesn’t mean you can’t channel some early holiday spirit. Fountain Square’s Ice Rink is officially open, offering daily skating and special events (like frozen-turkey bowling Nov. 24) all the way through February. Rent a pair of skates on-site and spend the day in the heart of downtown. Open daily. $6 admission; $4 skate rental. Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown,

Photo: Mikki Schaffner
Mystery fans have a tasty treat in store for them at The Carnegie in Covington with this 1970 award-winning play by Anthony Shaffer. It’s a two-man show about a renowned mystery writer who loves to play games, but when he discovers that his wife is about to leave him for another man, he maps out a scheme that aims at dire consequences for his romantic rival. Matters soon get out of hand, resulting in as much humor as drama as the complicated story unfolds. Be prepared for twists and turns that will keep you guessing. That’s the fun of it, after all. Through Nov. 22. $18-$25. The Carnegie, 1028 Scott St., Covington, Ky.,

'Robert Mapplethorpe'
Photo: Jeannette Mongtomery Barron
Seven regional curators have each chosen five new works by local artists that reflect how Mapplethorpe’s The Perfect Moment influences today’s artistic landscape. When the CAC presented that show in 1990, law-enforcement officials infamously and unsuccessfully prosecuted it on obscenity charges. Thirteen of Mapplethorpe’s own photographs will be displayed; many — if not all — were in the The Perfect Moment, including one of a naked 5-year-old boy, “Jesse McBride,” that was specifically cited in the 1990 prosecution. Also, 1980’s “Man in a Polyester Suit,” controversial for its depiction of a man wearing a suit but exposing his penis, will be shown. Read more about Mapplethorpe and The Perfect Moment here. After the Moment: Reflections on Robert Mapplethorpe continues through March 13 at the Contemporary Arts Center. More info:

'The Art of the Brick'
Photo: Cincinnati Museum Center
Millions of LEGO bricks are taking over the Cincinnati Museum Center. Anticipated exhibit The Art of the Brick features more than 100 artworks created by contemporary artist Nathan Sawaya using nothing other than LEGOs. Explore life-size human figures, a 20-foot-long T-Rex skeleton and replicated famous paintings, including “Starry Night” and “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” plus familiar sculptures like “The Thinker” and the Sphinx. Sawaya has also created a Cincinnati-themed piece that will be revealed when the exhibit debuts. Create your own LEGO masterpieces in the interactive Brickopolis, and don’t miss special themed days revolving around Star Wars, dinosaurs, superheroes and more. Through May 1. $19.50 adults; $12.50 children 12 and under. Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, 513-287-7000,
<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (11/6-11/8)]]> FRIDAY


As the Contemporary Arts Center prepares to open After the Moment: Reflections on Robert Mapplethorpe this Friday, the show — especially the opening itself — is taking on a much more historical dimension than first planned. The primary thrust of the show remains: Seven regional curators have each chosen five new works by local artists that reflect how Mapplethorpe’s The Perfect Moment influences today’s artistic landscape. When the CAC presented that show in 1990, law-enforcement officials infamously and unsuccessfully prosecuted it on obscenity charges. But one new and key element will be a 7 p.m. Friday lecture, for CAC members only, by photographer Andres Serrano. His 1987 “Piss Christ,” an eerily beautiful color image of a plastic crucifix inside a glass of urine, was as much a part of the era’s “culture wars” as anything in Mapplethorpe’s The Perfect Moment. After the Moment: Reflections on Robert Mapplethorpe opens at the Contemporary Arts Center Friday and runs through March 13. More info:

Justin Hoover and Chris Treggiari, the artists behind the ongoing project War Gastronomy — “a dual-industrial tricycle system that unfolds into a pop-up food cart and cultural archive of personal stories of relocation, dislocation and overcoming struggle” — present Stew-topia, another community food- and story-sharing event at 21c Museum Hotel in conjunction with their participation in Wave Pool Gallery’s current exhibition, Holding Ground. Hoover and Treggiari will perform in Gano Alley (directly adjacent to 21c) on Friday and will hold a discussion of their work inside the Museum Hotel on Sunday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday; 4 p.m. Sunday. Free. 609 Walnut St., Downtown,

Cincinnati Cheese Festival
Photo: Provided
Get ready to get cheesy. Imbibe unlimited samples of more than 300 cheeses from international artisan producers at the Cincinnati Cheese Festival, which takes over the Christian Moerlein Brewing Co. on Friday. Things heat up during the Grilled Cheese Meltdown, when local eateries like C’est Cheese, Taste of Belgium and CRAVE compete to whip up the most imaginative (and tasty) grilled-cheese sandwich — fest-goers vote for their favorites. General admission includes two drink tickets, and local band Blue Caboose performs Americana and Bluegrass music throughout the evening. 6-11 p.m. Friday. $40. 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, 

Megan Hilty
Photo: Provided
Broadway songstress and vocal diva Megan Hilty (you may know her from her turn as Glinda in Wicked or from the TV-series Smash) takes the stage to perform Tristate sweetheart Rosemary Clooney’s classic songs, including “Come Rain or Come Shine,” “April in Paris,” “Tenderly” and more, in a moving tribute with accompaniment from the Cincinnati Pops. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $20-$110. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Ass Ponys
Photo: Provided
One of the more renowned Cincinnati bands of the past few decades, Ass Ponys, reunites this weekend for a pair of shows at Woodward Theater (1404 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, Tickets for the 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday shows are available through for $25 (or $40 for both nights). The band will be playing songs from throughout its career, with 35-40 rehearsed tunes to choose from each night (the set lists will differ). These are the first Ass Ponys shows in more than a decade. Read more about the band, including an interview with frontman Chuck Cleaver, in this week's Spill It. Ass Ponys perform Friday and Saturday at Woodward Theater. More info/tickets:

Wanna feel old? Everclear is currently celebrating the 20th anniversary of its breakout album, Sparkle and Fade. The album gave us the depressingly optimistic single “Santa Monica” and seemed to perfectly sum up the feelings of a generation at the time.  Like Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” or Soundgarden’s “Black Hole Sun,” “Santa Monica” never seems to go away and remains the defining song for Everclear, despite other successful singles. Read more about the band in this week's Sound Advice. Everclear plays Friday with Hydra Melody at Bogart's. More info/tickets:

Pucks and Pinot
Photo: Cincinnati Cyclones 
If you’re a fan of hockey and wine, head to the Cincinnati Cyclones game against the Adirondack Thunder early on Friday for a pre-game wine tasting featuring Hanover Winery. Taste eight favorite local wines and sample a selection of hors d’oeuvres. There will be music provided by local Folk/Americana band Young Heirlooms, and event tickets include a commemorative wine glass and a discounted game ticket. 6 p.m. Friday. $35. U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway St., Downtown,

Balázs Dániel
Photo: Provided
One of the region’s most unique musical events, the Blues & Boogie Piano Summit, is not just a “Blues festival,” it’s also a two-day concert that spotlights a specific sub-genre of Blues — Boogie Woogie. The vintage and uniquely American artform still maintains an international audience of die-hard fans, as local Ambassador of Boogie Ricky Nye’s frequent trips to Europe prove. Nye hosts the 16th-annual event this weekend and once again brings in some international talent for the showcase. Joining Nye (and the house band featuring Chris Douglas, Paul Ellis and Brian Hogg) this year are French players Fabrice Eulry and Philippe LeJeune, as well as Hungary’s Balázs Dániel. 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $20-$30. Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, Ky.,

Every Cincinnatian knows that the Christian Moerlein Lager House is one of the premier spots to down a cold one. But this Saturday Christian Moerlein is taking things to festive levels of fun with its Holiday Beer Extravaganza. The extravaganza will boast more than 20 different selections of imported and craft beers — just what you need to jump-start your holiday cheer. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Moerlein Lager House, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, Downtown,

Northside Record Fair
The third-annual Northside Record Fair returns to North Presbyterian Church for an afternoon of musical digging and discovery. Vendors from across the region will be bringing thousands of rare records covering all audio ground from Jazz and Punk to Prog and Country. Search more than 40 tables of LPs, 45s, cassettes, posters, CDs, T-shirts and other memorabilia as The Queen City Imperial Soundsystem spins deep Reggae, Dub and Dancehall cuts. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. $5; $10 early-bird (10 a.m. entry). 4222 Hamilton Ave., Northside,

Holler Festival
Photo: New Riff Distilling
Nearly 5 million barrels of bourbon are aging in the Bluegrass State, and you get to enjoy the best of them at the first-ever Holler Festival. Join Kentucky breweries and distilleries as they showcase their signature craft beers and whiskeys. Learn the secrets of the trade, sample drinks and heavy appetizers, grab your special-edition glass and hang out with the best bourbon producers in Kentucky. Participating breweries and distilleries include Ei8ht Ball, Copper & Kings American Brandy, Blue Stallion Brewing, Old Pogue Distillery and The Gentleman Distillery. All proceeds benefit Renaissance Covington. 6-10 p.m. $50. New Riff Distilling, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky.,

Pumpkin Chuck
Photo: Provided
If you find yourself in Stanbery Park this Saturday and notice trebuchets slinging pumpkins through the air, do not be alarmed. The annual Mount Washington Community Council’s Pumpkin Chuck features live local music, food and drink vendors and, of course, the high-velocity launching of massive pumpkins with medieval military equipment. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Free. Stanbery Park, 2221 Oxford Ave., Mount Washington,

Mike Lupica
Photo: Taylor McKelvy Lupica 
Longtime New York Daily News sports columnist and ESPN commentator Mike Lupica began writing novels in the mid-1980s and hasn’t stopped since, dropping works of fiction — from mysteries to stories for younger audiences — every few years. Just in time for the new NBA season, Lupica’s latest novel, Fast Break, centers on a gifted basketball player who is sent across town to live with affluent foster parents following his mother’s death. Per Kirkus Review’s recent take on Fast Break: “Nothing groundbreaking here, but Lupica delivers solid action and character growth.” Lupica reads from and discusses Fast Break at Joseph-Beth. 7 p.m. Saturday. Free. 2692 Madison Road, Rookwood Pavilion, Norwood,

Photo: Mikki Schaffner
Mystery fans have a tasty treat in store for them at The Carnegie in Covington with this 1970 award-winning play by Anthony Shaffer. It’s a two-man show about a renowned mystery writer who loves to play games, but when he discovers that his wife is about to leave him for another man, he maps out a scheme that aims at dire consequences for his romantic rival. Matters soon get out of hand, resulting in as much humor as drama as the complicated story unfolds. Be prepared for twists and turns that will keep you guessing. That’s the fun of it, after all. Through Nov. 22. $18-$25. The Carnegie, 1028 Scott St., Covington, Ky.,


Recently divorced, life goes on for comedian Lisa Landry. “Best thing I’ve ever done,” she says before correcting herself. “It wasn’t the best thing I’ve ever done. I should have shot him in the head. My mistake was I paid a lawyer instead of a judge.” That experience has been the source of some material of course, as has her breakup with booze. “We just broke up, tequila and I. We had a parting of ways. I told her, ‘I love you girl, but this is not healthy.’” While at Go Bananas, Landry will be recording promos for her as-yet-untitled CD, due for release this winter. Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery,



Temperatures may be in the 70s this week, but that doesn’t mean you can’t channel some early holiday spirit. Fountain Square’s Ice Rink is officially open, offering daily skating and special events (like frozen-turkey bowling Nov. 24) all the way through February. Rent a pair of skates on-site and spend the day in the heart of downtown. Open daily. $6 admission; $4 skate rental. Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown,

'The Art of the Brick'
Photo: Cincinnati Museum Center


Millions of LEGO bricks are taking over the Cincinnati Museum Center. Anticipated exhibit The Art of the Brick features more than 100 artworks created by contemporary artist Nathan Sawaya using nothing other than LEGOs. Explore life-size human figures, a 20-foot-long T-Rex skeleton and replicated famous paintings, including “Starry Night” and “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” plus familiar sculptures like “The Thinker” and the Sphinx. Sawaya has also created a Cincinnati-themed piece that will be revealed when the exhibit debuts. Create your own LEGO masterpieces in the interactive Brickopolis, and don’t miss special themed days revolving around Star Wars, dinosaurs, superheroes and more. Through May 1. $19.50 adults; $12.50 children 12 and under. Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, 513-287-7000,

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (10/23-10/25)]]>



Millions of LEGO bricks are taking over the Cincinnati Museum Center. Anticipated exhibit The Art of the Brick features more than 100 artworks created by contemporary artist Nathan Sawaya using nothing other than LEGOs. Explore life-size human figures, a 20-foot-long T-Rex skeleton and replicated famous paintings, including “Starry Night” and “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” plus familiar sculptures like “The Thinker” and the Sphinx. Sawaya has also created a Cincinnati-themed piece that will be revealed when the exhibit debuts. Create your own LEGO masterpieces in the interactive Brickopolis, and don’t miss special themed days revolving around Star Wars, dinosaurs, superheroes and more. Through May 1. $19.50 adults; $12.50 children 12 and under. Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, 513-287-7000,

This casual “flower power” party is held in conjunction with the Cincinnati Art Museum’s four-day biennial event Art in Bloom. On display Thursday through Sunday, the exhibit features the work of more than 60 florists, who have each created floral arrangements inspired by artwork from the museum’s collection; flowers interpret the color scheme, mood and other aspects of individual paintings or sculptures. Bloom Under the Moon combines the artful arrangements with light bites, cocktails, wine and a DJ. 7-10 p.m. Friday. $45. 953 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park,

Fall Fest Weekend
Photo: 3CDC
Between music festivals and celebrations dedicated to beer, it may seem like Washington Park is more adult-playground than actual playground. But this weekend the park transforms into a family fun zone for Fall Fest. Enjoy family-friendly movies on Friday night (Scooby Doo: Decoy for a Dog Napper at 7:30 p.m. and The Addams Family at 8:15 p.m.) and activities all day Saturday and Sunday, including a performance by the Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati, magic shows, live music and even an apple pie-eating contest. 7:30-10 p.m. Friday; noon-7:30 p.m. Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Free. 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Cincinnati Art & Antiques Festival
Photo: Provided
This three-day extravaganza features 18th- to 20th-century English, American and Continental furniture, as well as fine art, posters and prints from a distinguished group of dealers, all set up in elaborate room displays in Music Hall. Proceeds benefit the Convalescent Hospital for Children and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Noon-5 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $10 three-day admission. 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Lyfe Jennings
Photo: Provided
Toledo, Ohio native Lyfe Jennings’ life could have been quite different, but it was actually a stint in jail (and inspiration from an Erykah Badu album) that turned things around. As soon as he was released (he was serving a 10-year sentence for arson), Jennings set about pursuing his dreams of a career in music, recording a demo and winning multiple “amateur nights” at the Apollo Theater in New York. He landed a major-label deal, releasing a string of critically and commercially successful albums that showcase a mix of vintage-to-modern R&B, Soul and Hip Hop, as well as his abilities as a singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer. Jennings’ sixth album, Tree of Lyfe, came out this summer.  7 p.m. Friday. $38-$48. Bogart’s, 2621 Vine St., Corryville,

Photo: Ryan Kurtz

Did you know that Barbra Streisand has a personal shopping mall filled with memorabilia in the basement of her lavish Malibu estate? It’s true — she’s even published a coffee-table book about it. That’s what inspired this very funny one-man show. An out-of-work actor is hired to be the shopkeeper, and he gets to hang out and play store with the legendary musical star. It’s a fantasy, of course, but with enough reality to make the show hilarious, especially in the hands of Nick Cearley, a veteran comic New York actor who has appeared several times at Ensemble Theatre. Through Nov. 1. $28-$44. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine,

The third-annual Beer Baron Ball at Horseshoe Casino features dining, dancing, a silent auction and craft beer. The part acts as a fundraiser for the Cincinnati Brewing Heritage Trail, which celebrates Cincinnati's rich brewing heritage and is the next step in the Brewery District's historical redevelopment. The event will also honor the legacy of former Cincinnati beer barons Conrad Windisch and Gottlieb and Heinrich Muhlhauser of the 19th-century Windisch-Muhlhauser brewery. 6:30 p.m. Friday. $40. Horseshoe Casino, Pendleton, 

Nearly anything goes at this philanthropic run — as long as you don’t come as yourself. Run the 3.1-mile course in your most creative costume; after you cross the finish line, the event becomes a costume party with food, drinks and live music. Benefits the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 7:30 p.m. Friday. $35 pre-registration; $45 day-of. Begins and ends at 3614 Woodburn Ave, Walnut Hills,

Is Music Hall really haunted? Find out for yourself during this guided tour that includes stops at the ballroom, freight elevator, Corbett Tower, backstage and more. Guests encouraged to bring their own ghost-hunting equipment. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday. $25. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-621-2787,



Covers a wide range of grisly topics from murder and suicide to decapitation. Follow your guide by lantern light as he or she regales you with tales of haunts including Bobby Mackey’s Music World. 7 and 9 p.m. Saturday. $20. Tours begin at 18 E. Fifth St., Newport, Ky.,

Dress up in costume and head to the Aronoff Center for Exhale Dance Tribe’s popular Halloween show. Choreography incorporates elements of Contemporary and Jazz dance. 3 and 8:30 p.m. Saturday. Aronoff Center, Jarson-Kaplan Theater, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-505-6340,

Eton Place Alley Festival
Photo: Provided
In a rapidly transforming neighborhood like Over-the-Rhine, advocacy for historically overlooked public spaces is often left out of strategic development efforts. In an effort to combat this oversight, Cincinnati-based nonprofit Spring in Our Steps will host a pop-up art installation by artist Mary Baxter, commenting on the construct of alleyways as catalysts for fear. Baxter’s large-scale installation, Miedo, is a series of nine-foot tapestries composed entirely of clothing collected from local thrift stores, which activate window wells within the alley directly adjacent to Rhinegeist Brewery. The festival is free and will feature food and beverages, and Spring in Our Steps will offer a walking tour of the neighborhood alleys and stairways a few hours before the festivities begin. 3-7 p.m. Saturday. Free. 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Celebrate the 150th anniversary of Jules Verne’s sci-fi classic, From the Earth to the Moon, with a costume party at the Cincinnati Observatory. The tale, which follows three men as they attempt to launch themselves onto the moon via a space gun, is perfect for some steampunk flair, so break out your best corsets, goggles and waistcoats for an evening of sci-fi discussion and moon viewing. 7-9 p.m. Saturday. $15; $10 in costume. 3849 Observatory Place, Mount Lookout, 

Not entirely sure what to do with yourself for Halloween? Have a costume but nowhere to go? Support a local charity and have yourself a blast at this year’s Halloween Gala, hosted by Children’s Dyslexia Centers of Cincinnati, a nonprofit dedicated to literacy. Enjoy music by the Naked Karate Girls, food from the Midwest Culinary Institute, a costume contest and more. 7 p.m. Saturday. Tickets start at $50. Cincinnati Masonic Center, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown,

James Gilmer and Abigail Morwood in 'Lady of the Camellias'
Photo: Tulsa Ballet
Imagine it’s 1998. Cincinnati Ballet is performing Val Caniparoli’s choreography for a full-length story ballet — the exquisite 1995 Lady of the Camellias. It’s the first time artistic director (now CEO) Victoria Morgan has chosen a ballet for her company from the up-and-coming choreographer. The story is from Alexandre Dumas’ Camille, the famous 1848 novel about a tragically doomed courtesan of the Paris demimonde, where high and not-so-high society mix in a heady whirl of champagne, fancy balls and fashionable romantic liaisons. Cut to 2015. This weekend, the Ballet again presents Lady of the Camellias. It’s the 20th anniversary of the production’s premiere. Choreographer Caniparoli is now very highly regarded; perhaps the busiest choreographer in the United States, with more than 100 works to his credit. Among them: Cincinnati Ballet’s popular Frisch’s Presents The Nutcracker, which ran from 2001-2011, as well as the brilliant shorter works “Caprice” and “Vivace.” And, it turns out that Lady of the Camellias, Caniparoli’s first full-length story ballet 20 years ago, has become nothing less than a modern masterpiece. “It’s one of the great dramatic ballets, like Romeo and Juliet,” Boston Ballet artistic director Mikko Nissinen has said. Read more about Lady of the Camellias here. Cincinnati Ballet will perform Lady of the Camellias 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 and 8 p.m. Sunday. More info: 

'Mad River Rising'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
The Cincinnati Playhouse opens Mad River Rising, a play by Dana Yeaton that artistic director Blake Robison produced two decades ago in New Hampshire. It’s about an elderly man, escaped from a retirement home and hiding out in an old barn hayloft, defending the family farm where he grew up and grew old. The script has been updated and relocated to Ohio, so it’s a new work in many ways. It drifts back and forth in time, especially to a catastrophic 1937 flood. An insight into aging, it’s also a poetic tribute to hanging onto places with meaning. Through Nov. 14. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888,

Alex Scott
Photo: Provided
Alex Scott is a comedic chameleon of sorts. Virginia locals know him as Comedy Dad, a blogger and TV personality who works for the local NBC and FOX affiliates. On his dad blog, he waxes about everything from baby wipes to the environment. On stage, though, he’s more freewheeling, recounting past experiences in the Air Force, working in a hospital and being a teacher. “I had one kid say ‘I’m gonna build a bomb and blow up this place,’ ” he tells an audience about a former student. “You can’t even make a Valentine’s Day card, sit your ass down.” Thursday-Sunday. $15-$17. Funny Bone on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Annie Fitzpatrick and Bruce Cromer in 'Death of a Salesman'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
The production of Arthur Miller’s 1949 Pulitzer Prize-winning Death of a Salesman is coinciding with the 100th anniversary of the playwright’s birth. It’s unarguably one of the great plays of the 20th century, and Cincy Shakes’ artistic director Brian Isaac Phillips has put together a masterful staging featuring two of our region’s finest professional actors.Bruce Cromer pours himself into the weary nowhere man, Willy Loman, a traveling salesman at the end of his sadly frayed rope. He admits to being “a little tired,” but he’s way beyond that. He lives in a world of self-aggrandizing fantasy, haunted by his past, roads not taken and wrong-headed decisions. He vacillates between blaming others for his plight — especially his weak-willed son Biff (Justin McCombs) — and reverting to glories that never actually happened in a life that was truly humdrum. He yearns to be remembered, but of course, he’s not done much worthy of recollection. Cromer runs the gamut from delusion to regret in an anxious, wrenching performance. Read the full review here. Death of a Salesman , presented by Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, continues through Nov. 7. More info/tickets: 


'Antique Halloween'
Photo: Taft Museum of Art

Travel back in time while viewing the Taft’s Antique Halloween exhibit, a one-room display of objects from 1900 to the 1950s. Items range from party invitations and games to candy and cups. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday through Nov. 1. $10 adults; $5 kids 6-17; free kids 5 and under; free Sundays. Taft Museum of Art, 316 Pike St., 513-241-0343,

Pop Up Drag Brunch
Photo: Provided


Metropole’s inaugural HallowQueen Pop Up will feature specialty cocktails, a family-style brunch and performances by local drag queens. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday. $35. Metropole in the 21c Museum, 609 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-578-6660,

Photo: Kathy Newton
Kids and animals alike are in for a special treat during the Cincinnati Zoo’s HallZOOween festival. This family-friendly Halloween celebration features trick-or-treat stations for the kids, costumed characters, a Hogwarts Express train ride and special pumpkin playtime for elephants, otters, meerkats and more. Bring your own treat bag to stuff with goodies and hunt for the Golden Frisch’s Big Boy. Two golden Big Boy statues will be hidden around the zoo each weekend; whoever finds them wins a special zoo/Frisch’s prize package (with tartar sauce). Follow clues on the zoo’s Twitter page: #BigBoyClue. Noon-5 p.m. Select Saturdays and Sundays in October. Free with zoo admission ($18 adult; $12 child/senior). Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale,

Coney Island is getting creepy for its family-friendly Fall-O-Ween Festival. In addition to the park’s 24 classic rides, the fest features pumpkin painting, magic shows, barnyard animals and a light show choreographed to Halloween music. Use a giant slingshot to smash a pumpkin against a target or opt to take the kids to make their very own apple pie. New this year is a trick-or-treat trail through Coney’s Creep County Fair, a town populated by kid-sized buildings and candy-wielding characters. Also make sure to catch the Monster Bash live show for a little eerie entertainment every hour between 2 and 6 p.m. 1-7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 25. $11; $5 parking. Coney Island, 6201 Kellogg Ave., California, 513-232-8230, 

Meat Wave
Photo: Katie Hovland
Chicago threesome Meat Wave’s name apparently causes giggles and results in a lot of questions (fair enough, as it was reportedly taken from the headline of a 12-year-old story from The Onion: “Dozens Dead In Chicago-Area Meatwave”). But the group’s name isn’t (or at least shouldn’t be) as head-turning as its vibrant take on modern Post Punk, displayed magnificently on Meat Wave’s recent full-length (and debut for the esteemed SideOneDummy Records), Delusion Moon. The trio — singer/guitarist Chris Sutter, bassist Joe Gac and drummer Ryan Wizniak — came together in 2011 in an effort to start a project that was a bit more of an aggressive outlet than the members’ other bands at the time. As evidenced by the following year’s great self-titled/self-released nine-track album, the chemistry between the three musicians was instant. Read more about Meat Wave in this week's Sound Advice. See Meat Wave with The Dirty Nil Sunday at MOTR Pub. More info/tickets:

'Ramps for Leonardo'
Photo: Donald Kelley
Land art — or earth art — is a term for when artists go outside the gallery and, often using indigenous materials like soil, water and stone, create large works that seem integrated into the surrounding natural landscape. I recently wrote about a new film called Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art, directed by James Crump, former chief curator at Cincinnati Art Museum (see “Land Art,” issue of Sept. 30).When it works, it is a sublime merging of art and nature — awe-inspiring. But that merging of art-making and “outdoors” materials can also happen inside a gallery, although it’s a difficult undertaking. Donald Kelley, a professor emeritus at the University of Cincinnati’s DAAP, is taking on that task currently at downtown’s Weston Art Gallery. Transformed Worlds is on view through Nov. 8, and the work stands out for its sensitivity, thoughtfulness and ability to thoroughly transport. Read the full feature on the exhibit hereTransformed Worlds is on view at the Weston Art Gallery through Nov. 8. More info:

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (10/9-10/11)]]>



The AYE Music & Art Festival — founded in 2006 to raise money for various charities — returns for its biggest fest yet this Friday-Sunday. Held at several venues in Over-the-Rhine, proceeds from the 2015 edition of AYE (which stands for “Adjust Your Eyes”) will go to Boys Hope Girls Hope ( year’s AYE will again showcase elements of visual art, as well as comedy (in MOTR Pub’s basement each evening) and a wildly diverse lineup of music, with a heavy dose of local acts as well as some notable touring artists. The music runs the gamut from Electronic and Hip Hop to AltRock and Punk, plus most points in between. Read more about the festival in this week's Spill It. Three-day passes for AYE can be purchased through for $20 or day-of-show for $35. One-day passes are $15; single shows cost a cover charge between $5-$10. For more AYE info (including the complete schedule), visit

Helado Negro (Roberto Carlos Lange) presents a special multi-media show at the CAC this week.
Photo: Provided
Roberto Carlos Lange’s music, performed under the moniker Helado Negro, celebrates his Latin heritage in ways both obvious — he often sings in Spanish and there’s a breezily funky vibe to his textured electronic soundscapes — and subverting — his lyrics tend toward personal ambiguities and his song structures frequently jump off in unexpected directions.The child of Ecuadorian immigrants, Lange grew up immersed in the culture clash that was South Florida in the 1980s. He’s been writing and producing music under various guises since the late ’90s, but it wasn’t until he began recording as Helado Negro that Lange became more widely known, releasing four increasingly nuanced full-length albums since 2009. His most recent record, 2014’s Double Youth, was another satisfying refinement in his ability to create computer-generated music that is simultaneously intimate and otherworldly. Read CityBeat's interview with Lange here. Helado Negro performs Friday at the Contemporary Arts Center. Tickets/more info:

Cincinnati Craft Breweries' Oktoberfest
Photo: Listermann
The fourth-annual Cincinnati Craft Breweries’ Oktoberfest returns to the Listermann Brewing Company. Your favorite local brewers — Blank Slate, Fifty West, Christian Moerlein, Rivertown, Mt. Carmel and more — will descend on the brewery for a weekend of fall brews, food and a ceremonial keg tapping of Listermann’s Oktoberfest lager (the only official Oktoberfest beer at the party). Listermann has teamed up with Cincideutsch to give an authentic German feel to the festivities. Kids and dogs welcome. 5 p.m.-midnight Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday. Free admission. 1621 Dana Ave., Evanston,

Sounds in the Art at Chase Public
Photo: Richard Scheltz
Nashville-based, College-Conservatory of Music-trained percussionist Colleen Phelps presents an evening of percussion, spoken word and visual art at Chase Public. Aided by painter Drew Yakscoe, Phelps’ current project combines music and visual art and includes classical compositions by famous composers such as Bach, as well as more conceptual-based art practices like John Cage’s “Composed Improvisation For Snare Drum” and Antoine Saint-Exupéry’s “Je Demande Pardon aux Enfants.” 7 p.m. Friday. Free. 1569 Chase Ave., Suite 4, Northside,

When it comes to native spirits, there are few that excite as much as Kentucky bourbon. This weekend, the Mainstrasse Village Association and Wellmann’s Brands plan to bring the very best in micro, craft and large-scale distillery representations to keep the bourbon flowing at Oak, Toast & Two Aging Barrels. But there’s more to the bourbon festival than just drinking: Patrons will have the opportunity to attend a variety of seminars, presentations, paired family-style bourbon meals and meet-and-greets with master distillers. 6-10 p.m. Friday; 1-10 p.m. Saturday; noon-3 p.m. Sunday. Prices vary. Mainstrasse Village, Covington, Ky.,

The River Grill Before the Big Chill
Photo: Provided
If you ever thought you could win a Kansas City Barbecue Society-sanctioned cooking contest, now is your chance to prove it. If you could care less about a cooking competition and would rather enjoy eating barbecue at your leisure, this is your chance, too. The River Grill Before the Big Chill hosts barbecue competitions in categories including chicken, pork rib and pork butt with cash prizes and bragging rights. Following the competition, the “Big Chill” portion of the event features dozens of participating food vendors, live music and beer. Following the competition, the “Big Chill” portion of the event features dozens of participating food vendors, live music and beer. 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-9 p.m. Saturday. $5. Sawyer Point, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown,

Joe Tucker
Photo by Cameron Knight
Tucker’s, the comfort-food breakfast and lunch café and Over-the-Rhine landmark, has been a Vine Street institution for 50 years, opened by current owner Joe Tucker’s parents in 1957. In July, the restaurant’s kitchen caught fire and the resulting damage devastated the building, closing Tucker’s for now. However, the community is rallying to help the family raise money to rebuild by hosting a fundraiser at the Northside Tavern on Friday, featuring live music on three stages, plus food-for-a-donation from Joe himself. Donate online at 6 p.m.-2 a.m. Friday. Free. Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave., Northside,

Set just after Columbus’ discovery of the New World, Charise Castro Smith’s satirical and often anachronistic historical play covers a lot of territory. In 1504, Spain’s Queen Isabella is fretting about her empire and dying of some horrible plague, and she’s likely to be succeeded by her bratty daughter. Meanwhile, Isabella’s brilliant sister — a reclusive, atheist hunchback — is stuck in her bedroom thinking about cats, math and a Muslim lover. It’s a wild tale — just what you expect to see at Know Theatre — but this production comes to Over-the-Rhine from the drama program at the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music. Through Oct. 24. $20; $10 rush seats. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-300-5669,

Photo: Jesse Fox
CityBeat’s inaugural PET-oberfest celebrates Adopt a Shelter Pet Month by bringing hundreds of adoptable dogs, cats, puppies and kittens from local rescue and adoption groups to the Bertke Electric Warehouse in Northside. The goal of this festival is to find loving, permanent homes for pets from rescue agencies including Tails of Hope, Dream House Rescue, League of Animal Welfare, Luv Fur Mutts and more. Come and you just might meet your new furry family member. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Free admission. Bertke Electric Warehouse, 1645 Blue Rock St., Northside,

For the fifth year in a row, the City Flea showcases a variety of regional vendors, from vintage dealers and hair stylists to coffee shops and book sellers. Find anything and everything you need, all while enjoying the great social atmosphere of Washington Park. A live DJ provides music and trucks serve food all day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Cincinnati,

Great Ohio River Swim
Photo: Provided
Grab your goggles for the eighth-annual Great Ohio River Swim. Starting at the upstream end of the Serpentine Wall, this 900-meter course goes straight across the river to Kentucky and angles back to finish at Public Landing. A 30-minute swim clinic starts at 7:30 a.m. and will give nervous participants a rundown of the basics of open-water swimming in the Ohio River. Proceeds benefit Green Umbrella, a sustainability alliance for Cincinnati. Check-in begins 6:30 a.m.; race begins at 8:15 a.m. Saturday. $20-$25. Serpentine Wall, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Cincinnati,

Don’t fear the walking dead — dance with them at the inaugural Zombie Ball: Dance of the UnDead on Pyramid Hill. Come dressed as a zombie, vampire, mummy or your favorite ghoulish character and enjoy creepy cocktails, haunted hayrides and more with fellow specters. For a particularly stylish spook (and a few extra dollars), guests can be escorted to the event’s red carpet from the entrance of the park in a hearse. Dance “Thriller”-style with a DJ after imbibing an open beer-and-wine bar, and preserve the moment in a zombie photo booth. 7-11 p.m. Saturday. $30; $50 couples. 1763 Hamilton-Cleves Road, Hamilton, 513-868-8336, 

Photo: Lauryn Sophia
The first thing you see on the website for Portland, Maine quintet SeepeopleS is the pronouncement that the group plays “Anti-Genre-New-Music.” One listen to the group’s 2015 release, the two-disc, 25-song epic Dead Souls Sessions, and the description makes perfect sense. The band’s kitchen-sink Alt Rock is a psychedelic swirl of influences that makes it blissfully hard to pin down, rolling from ambient, acoustic Indie Folk to quirky Electro Pop to driving, trippy AltRock with an infectious sense of adventure that never slows down. It’s a head-trip of a listen in recorded form; it should be fascinating to see and hear the band pull off the ambitious album in a live context. 9 p.m. Saturday. $5. Stanley’s Pub, 323 Stanley Ave., Columbia Tusculum,

Greater Cincinnati Kitchen & Bath Show
Photo: Provided
Whether you’re in need of some renovation inspiration for your kitchen or bath, or you just get a thrill from looking at the latest in tiled backsplashes, the Greater Cincinnati Kitchen & Bath Show has what you need. The show features vendors that specialize in the latest trends and products in cabinetry, flooring, hardware, plumbing, general remodeling and more, including green upgrades and energy-efficient retrofits. Noon-8 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $8 adult; free for kids 12 and younger. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown,

Of course you know The Silence of the Lambs, the creepy movie about “Hannibal the Cannibal.” It was a big hit in 1991 with Anthony Hopkins as the brilliant, manipulative serial killer and Jodie Foster as the young FBI cadet who recruits him to help her catch a different psychopath. Well, wouldn’t you know that someone turned it into Silence! The Musical, an award winner at the 2005 New York International Fringe Festival? It’s become a cult favorite, and the parody-loving folks at Falcon Theatre have landed it after several years of hot pursuit. Bon appetit! Through Oct. 10. $15-$20. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky., 513-479-6783,

Ohio Sauerkraut Festival
Head to Waynesville, Ohio for the annual Ohio Sauerkraut Festival, featuring more than 30 nonprofit groups selling all sorts of sauerkraut dishes: pizza, pies, cookies, rolls, soups, pork and more. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. 10 N. Main St., Waynesville, Ohio,

Photo: Kathy Newton
Kids and animals alike are in for a special treat during the Cincinnati Zoo’s HallZOOween festival. This family-friendly Halloween celebration features trick-or-treat stations for the kids, costumed characters, a Hogwarts Express train ride and special pumpkin playtime for elephants, otters, meerkats and more. Bring your own treat bag to stuff with goodies and hunt for the Golden Frisch’s Big Boy. Two golden Big Boy statues will be hidden around the zoo each weekend; whoever finds them wins a special zoo/Frisch’s prize package (with tartar sauce). Follow clues on the zoo’s Twitter page: #BigBoyClue. Noon-5 p.m. Select Saturdays and Sundays in October. Free with zoo admission ($18 adult; $12 child/senior). Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale,

Cincinnati Chocolate Festival
Photo: Provided
It’s paradise for your sweet tooth: an entire afternoon of tastings, contests and demonstrations centered on nothing but chocolate. The sixth-annual fest features more than 20 vendors — including Aglamesis Bro.’s, Macaron Bar, Three B’s Sweets and Gigi’s Cupcakes — who will give out treats throughout the day in exchange for tasting tickets. The event also incorporates several cooking demos, including a lesson on using sweet flavors to encourage your kids to eat healthy foods. At 1:30 p.m., Food Network host Ben Vaughn — an award-winning chef and restaurateur — will demonstrate a chocolate recipe from his new book Southern Routes. Noon-5 p.m. Sunday. $10; free 12 and younger. Cintas Center, Xavier University, 1624 Herald Ave., Evanston, 513-745-3428, 

Lauren Groff
Photo: © Megan Brown 
Lauren Groff’s Fates and Furies focuses on two charismatic characters, Lancelot (Lotto) and Mathilde, as they navigate the peaks and valleys of their seemingly idyllic matrimony. The depths and intricacies of these two protagonists are revealed separately in two sections, with Lotto recounting their lives in Fates, and Mathilde often offering divergent takes and revealing new truths in Furies. It’s a bold, nakedly honest, deeply sensual novel filled with literary references from Greek mythology to Shakespeare. Fates and Furies has been long-listed for the 2015 National Book Award. Groff is also the author of two other novels and a collection of short stories. She has won the Paul Bowles Prize for Fiction, the PEN/O. Henry Award and the Pushcart Prize. Read CityBeat's interview with Groff here. Lauren Groff will read from Fates and Furies 5 p.m. Sunday at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Rookwood Commons. More info:

Weeki Wachee Mermaids
Photo: Provided 
Mermaids are no longer a myth — they are a limited-time attraction at the Newport Aquarium. Watch the graceful and finned Weeki Wachee Mermaids as they swim underwater with sea creatures daily inside the aquarium’s tanks. The Weeki Wachee Mermaids, a classic roadside attraction from Weeki Wachee Springs State Park in Florida, have been swimming for more than 60 years, delighting visitors with simple magic. Through Oct. 12. Free with admission. Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., 

Old West Fest
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
If you have a pair of cowboy boots laying around that you’ve been meaning to break out, you’re in luck — Old West Fest is back for its eighth year, featuring an authentic recreated Old West Dodge-City-style town, with gold panning, covered-wagon rides, kids activities, live entertainment (including trick riding and a saloon show) and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Through Oct. 18. $12 adults; $6 ages 6-12; free under 12. 1449 Greenbush Cobb Road, Williamsburg,

Ohio Renaissance Festival
Photo: Will Thorpe Photography 
The Ohio Renaissance Festival is back and bringing fall weekends filled with costumes, turkey legs, mulled mead, jousting, games, glass-blowing demonstrations, choirs, crafts and tarot readings inside a 30-acre, recreated 16th-century village. This weekend is opening weekend, so tickets for adults are buy-one-get-one, and kids under 12 get in free. Be sure to check the website for themed weekends and different deals. Nerds of all kinds welcome — just remember that any medieval weapons you might bring need to be tied in a sheath at all times. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays (and Labor Day). Through Oct. 25. $21.95 adult; $9.95 child; $119.95 season pass. 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville, 

Season 6 begins with a 90-minute premiere followed by Chris Hardwick’s Talking Dead. Here’s what we know: Morgan and Rick will finally have a chance to catch up (hopefully we’ll get a dedicated flashback scene/episode that shows how Morgan transformed from his condition in “Clear” to his current state of badassery); comic character Paul “Jesus” Monroe will be introduced; Ethan Embry, Merritt Wever and Corey Hawkins (Straight Outta Compton’s Dr. Dre) join the cast; and the group — currently living in the safe-ish community of Alexandria outside Washington, D.C. — will face multiple threats from outside the walls and within. Season Premiere, 9 p.m., AMC.

Ruth’s Parkside Café celebrates two years in business with a special dinner to benefit Churches Active in Northside. 5-8 p.m. $40. Ruth’s, 1550 Blue Rock St., Northside,

The Fall Floral Show at the Krohn Conservatory hosts an event to highlight everyone’s favorite fungus: mushrooms. Chef Ursula will prepare exotic mushroom bruschetta, triple mushroom barley soup and fall flavor-infused beers from Queen City Brewery. 1-3 p.m. $4 adults. Krohn Conservatory, Eden Park,

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (10/2-10/4)]]> FRIDAY

Louis conducts LOVE FORBIDDEN

The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra rules when it comes to mashing up live music with images. But this week, the orchestra takes on a more formidable challenge: performing Arnold Schoenberg’s symphonic tone poem Pelléas und Mélisande with visual accompaniment of projections and video created by innovative young director, production designer and visual artist James Darrah.“This is nearly 40 minutes of continuous music, so it’s more like a cousin of Lumenocity,” says CSO Music Director Louis Langrée. He had not seen any of Darrah’s previous productions, but Langrée knew of his work with the San Francisco Opera and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. And there was another connection.Last year, Darrah staged Don Giovanni for the Milwaukee Symphony, where Isaac Thompson, an alumnus of the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, served on the artistic operations staff. In January, Thompson assumed the position of the CSO’s director of artistic operations. He arranged for Langrée and Darrah to meet, and in May the two artists sat down in Langrée’s East Walnut Hills home to discuss potential projects. Read the full feature here. Love Forbidden opens Friday and continues Saturday at Music Hall. More info:

Photo: Provided
Break out the bike for MOTOBERFEST

Formerly known as the Queen City Mods and Rockers Rally, “Motoberfest” is a weekend celebration of café and vintage motorcycles and scooters themed around Cincinnati’s German brewing heritage. The festival features motorcycle stunt shows, an opportunity to show off your ride in a judged bike show, group rides, art shows, live music, brewery tours and more for bikers and bike-enthusiasts. 6 p.m.-11 p.m. Thursday; 6 p.m.-midnight Friday; 8 a.m.-midnight Saturday. $30 all-access pass. Various venues around OTR. More info at

Watch people sing about cannibalism in SILENCE! THE MUSICAL
Of course you know The Silence of the Lambs, the creepy movie about “Hannibal the Cannibal.” It was a big hit in 1991 with Anthony Hopkins as the brilliant, manipulative serial killer and Jodie Foster as the young FBI cadet who recruits him to help her catch a different psychopath. Well, wouldn’t you know that someone turned it into Silence! The Musical, an award winner at the 2005 New York International Fringe Festival? It’s become a cult favorite, and the parody-loving folks at Falcon Theatre have landed it after several years of hot pursuit. Bon appetit! Through Oct. 10. $15-$20. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky., 513-479-6783,

The Kentucky Wool Festival
Photo: Provided

Buy some yarn at the KENTUCKY WOOL FESTIVAL

The Kentucky Wool Festival: a celebration of sheep and the fleece we shear off them. Wander through tables of crafts with local pottery, accessories, homemade soaps and candles and wooden items of every kind. Stop by the wool tent for demonstrations of combing, wet felting, sheep shearing and Turkish spindling. Then grab a chocolate-dipped pie and check out the Queen City Cloggers and other live entertainment all weekend. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. $5; free for children younger than 5. 48 Concord Caddo Road, Falmouth, Ky.,

Reckless Kelly
Photo: Provided
Austin's RECKLESS KELLY plays Southgate House Revival

All things Austin, Texas, have been coming to a head the last few years in the music world. Always a great music town, the scene has blown up to almost too-big proportions, with the South By Southwest festival growing to seemingly unsustainable levels. Reckless Kelly, however, has been walking the streets of Austin since the band migrated there from Idaho in the late 1990s. At the heart of the group are brothers Willy and Cody Braun, who grew up in a family of musicians that included their bandleader father, who fronted a Western Swing outfit. In essence, Reckless Kelly is a Roots music band that almost perfectly fits the mold suggested by the Americana genre tag. Read more about the band in this week's Sound Advice. See Reckless Kelly with Noah Smith Friday at Southgate House Revival. More info/tickets:

Photo: Kathy Newton
Watch animals eat pumpkins at HALLZOOWEEN

Kids and animals alike are in for a special treat during the Cincinnati Zoo’s HallZOOween festival. This family-friendly Halloween celebration features trick-or-treat stations for the kids, costumed characters, a Hogwarts Express train ride and special pumpkin playtime for elephants, otters, meerkats and more. Bring your own treat bag to stuff with goodies and hunt for the Golden Frisch’s Big Boy. Two golden Big Boy statues will be hidden around the zoo each weekend; whoever finds them wins a special zoo/Frisch’s prize package (with tartar sauce). Follow clues on the zoo’s Twitter page: #BigBoyClue. Noon-5 p.m. Select Saturdays and Sundays in October. Free with zoo admission ($18 adult; $12 child/senior). Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale,

Sunflower Festival
Photo: Gorman Heritage Farm
Pick your own sunflower at the SUNFLOWER FESTIVAL

This annual festival, hosted by Gorman Heritage Farm, includes all the fun of fall with a few twists. Jump on a mule-drawn wagon ride through the sunflower fields. Don’t just pick a pumpkin; fling it from a pumpkin launch. Gather your own bouquet of sunflowers, or wander a corn maze, get your face painted and meet the animals on this working farm. Food trucks will be available both days and local crafts highlight homemade products. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $8 adults; $5 kids; free for 2 and younger. Gorman Heritage Farm, 10052 Reading Road, Evendale,

Weekend of Fire
Photo: Provided
Kick up the spice at Jungle Jim's WEEKEND OF FIRE
A great hot sauce can really put the right kick in your dish, and that’s what Jungle Jim’s Weekend of Fire is all about. Whether you consider yourself courageous enough to test the hottest varieties available or if you can’t stand anything beyond “mild,” Weekend of Fire has that sauce you’ve been dreaming of — along with rubs, salsas, snacks and any other edible you can kick up a notch. More than 55 vendors and 300 mouth-watering samples from around the country await your taste buds, with prizes going to fest favorites. Game booths and contests will keep the weekend spirit burning strong. And the very brave can face off in the Arena of Fire, where aficionados battle it out to see who can eat the hottest fiery food. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. $10. Jungle Jim’s Oscar Event Center, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 

'Light Strikes'
Photo: Rob Wolpert
LIGHT STRIKES closes at the Kennedy Heights Arts Center

To celebrate the opening of the new Kennedy Heights Cultural Campus annex in September, the Kennedy Heights Arts Center debuted Light Strikes, an exhibition of large-scale installations within its newest 9,000-square-foot gallery; it closes Saturday. Two artist collectives — Intermedio and Team B — as well as three individual artists — Sean Mullaney, Karen Saunders and Rob Wolpert —created site-specific installations to fill the vast room with light-based artwork. Some of the work is interactive and, according to curator Jonathan Sears of PAR-Projects, one of the main goals for the show was to balance the way each artist uses light to help viewers travel through the space. Closing reception: 7-9 p.m. Saturday. Free. 6620 Montgomery Road, Kennedy Heights,

Mikki Schaffner
Incline Theater presents EXTREMITIES — a bit more serious than their standard fare

This will be a test. Following a sold-out summer of musicals, the Incline Theater turns to far more serious fare with William Mastrosimone’s searing and controversial drama about the victim of an attempted rape who gets the upper hand on her attacker and contemplates vengeance. It’s not the kind of show that Cincinnati Landmark Productions is known for, but they’re hoping to broaden horizons and attract new audiences. Farrah Fawcett redefined herself as a serious actress on Broadway with this show and repeated the role of Marjorie in the 1986 movie version. Will Cincinnati audiences turn up? We’ll see. Through Oct. 18. $23-$26. Warsaw Federal Incline Theater, 801 Matson Place, E. Price Hill, 513-241-6550,

CCM takes on David Edgar's PENTECOST

Theater programs at our universities in Greater Cincinnati often produce shows that not only offer educational opportunities for students, but also expose us to works we have lost track of or missed. David Edgar’s Pentecost is such a work, and it accomplishes what Richard Hess likes to do — challenge audiences. The head of the drama program at the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music is directing Pentecost at Patricia Corbett Theater Thursday-Sunday. “There is theater that lets you escape by making you forget,” Hess says, “and there is theater that makes you escape by going deeper into yourself. Pentecost is one that takes you in.” Read a full review of the play here. Pentecost is staged Thursday-Sunday at CCM's Patricia Corbett Theater. More info/tickets:

Weeki Wachee Mermaids
Photo: Provided
See some magic at the Newport Aquarium with the WEEKI WACHEE MERMAIDS
Mermaids are no longer a myth — they are a limited-time attraction at the Newport Aquarium. Watch the graceful and finned Weeki Wachee Mermaids as they swim underwater with sea creatures daily inside the aquarium’s tanks. The Weeki Wachee Mermaids, a classic roadside attraction from Weeki Wachee Springs State Park in Florida, have been swimming for more than 60 years, delighting visitors with simple magic. Through Oct. 12. Free with admission. Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Celebrate Nigeria at NAIJA FEST
The Nigerian Association of Greater Cincinnati Area presents Naija Fest, a celebration of Nigeria’s independence. This year marks Nigeria’s 55th year as a free country, and this fest highlights the art and culture of the country with Nigerian dances, music, food and fashion. Noon-10 p.m. Saturday. Free. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown,

Watch the BENGALS take on the Chiefs
Fresh off an epic back-and-forth battle on the road against the division-rival Ravens, the undefeated Who Deys return to Paul Brown Stadium to host Kansas City. Can Andy Dalton and all his cool skill players score on the Chiefs’ D? Will Kansas City be angry after getting whomped by the Packers on Monday Night Football? Will Adam Jones do anything crazy? There’s only one way to find out — play the game! 1 p.m. Sunday. $40-$270. 1 Paul Brown Stadium, Downtown,

Tannahill Weavers
Photo: Provided
The TANNAHILL WEAVERS are one of vintage Celtic music's greatest torchbearers
If you are a fan of Celtic music, this week’s visit by Scotland’s greatest purveyors of the traditional sound, Tannahill Weavers, is a serious must-see event. The group formed in 1968 in Paisley, Scotland (near Glasgow) and has since become an international ambassador for the Scottish-slanted brand of Celtic music. While certainly dependent on the traditions of the centuries-old music (using classic instrumentation like bagpipes, bouzouki, flutes, bodhran and fiddle), the Weavers are also often lauded for injecting their translation of the sound with a dose of modern vitality — not quite on par with, say, the Punk-fueled Dropkick Murphys, but there is often a distinct Rock & Roll spirit behind the group’s approach and live energy. Tannahill Weavers are one of vintage Celtic music’s greatest torchbearers and deserve to be mentioned in the same breath as contemporary legends like The Chieftains. 7 p.m. Sunday. $12; $15 day of show. Molly Malone’s Covington, 112 E. Fourth St., Covington, Ky., 859-491-6659,

Tri-State Antique Market
Photo: Provided
Buy something cool at the final TRISTATE ANTIQUE MARKET of the season
The final Tri-State Antique Market of the season takes over the Lawrenceburg Indiana Fairgrounds with more than 200 antiques and vintage-only dealers. From estate jewelry and Civil War tintype to 19th-century primitives and Pop Art, everything must be at least 30 years old and out of production. It’s a show for collectors and casual shoppers alike. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. $3. US 50, Lawrenceburg, Ind.,

SuicideGirls Blackheart Burlesque
Photo: Provided
The SUICIDEGIRLS get sexy at the 20th Century Theater
Avid Instagram users might recognize SuicideGirls as the adult lifestyle brand that catapults pierced and tattooed models to social media fame (or you just might be a member of their online community), but the company also produces a burlesque show, which will be making a stop here in Cincinnati. Their tongue-in-cheek humor, choreography and provocative tributes to pop culture and music all combine to make it unlike any other burlesque act you’ve ever seen. As VICE called it, “Comicon meets burlesque nerd orgy.” 18 and up. 8:15 p.m. Sunday. $25-$85. 20th Century Theater, 3021 Madison Road, Oakley,  

'Sounds of Simon and Garfunkel'
Photo: Provided
The Cincinnati Pops tackles the SOUNDS OF SIMON AND GARFUNKEL
The Cincinnati Pops frequently perform Pop music — they take on live orchestrations of popular film scores, bring in celebrity guests (like Seinfeld’s and Broadway’s Jason Alexander in March 2016) and collaborate with musical groups like Pink Martini. This weekend, they’re going Folk and performing the Sounds of Simon and Garfunkel. Guest vocalists and guitarists AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle perform a tribute to the duo, covering songs like “Mrs. Robinson,” “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” “Cecilia” and other hits. 7 p.m. Sunday. $20-$90. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Photo: Mikki Schaffner
The Cincinnati Shakespeare Company stages CYRANO DE BERGERAC
Edmond Rostand’s play, like its hero, seems to have fallen unexpectedly from the moon. Cyrano de Bergerac was a surprising instant hit in Paris late in 1897. Its premiere received an hour-long standing ovation, and it was subsequently performed for 200 consecutive nights. The heroic comedy about the romantic swordsman and poet was an anomaly in late 19th-century France, when literature was rife with realistic tales by the likes of Émile Zola and Alexandre Dumas, fils. Read the full review of Cincy Shakes' production of Cyrano here. Cyrano de Bergerac is staged at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company through Oct. 3. More info/tickets:

'Fear the Walking Dead'
Photo: Justin Lubin, AMC
Watch the finale of FEAR THE WALKING DEAD
The military moves out, the dead begin to gain numbers and our survivors work to keep their families — and bodies — from being ripped apart. And your prayers have been answered: a new episode of Talking Dead follows the finale. Season Finale, 9 p.m., AMC.

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (9/25-9/27)]]> FRIDAY

Spend the weekend at the MIDPOINT MUSIC FESTIVAL

The most common question associated with Cincinnati’s MidPoint Music Festival — besides “Are you going?” — is probably something along the lines of, “Who should I go see?” The festival, which returns to various venues around Over-the-Rhine and downtown this Friday-Sunday, has always been about exploration and discovery, and word-of-mouth recommendations are some of the best ways to find great new music at MPMF. Hopefully CityBeat — which owns and operates MPMF, now in its 14th year — can also be of assistance as you plot your MidPoint adventure. The most common question associated with Cincinnati’s MidPoint Music Festival — besides “Are you going?” — is probably something along the lines of, “Who should I go see?” The festival, which returns to various venues around Over-the-Rhine and downtown this Friday-Sunday, has always been about exploration and discovery, and word-of-mouth recommendations are some of the best ways to find great new music at MPMF. Hopefully CityBeat — which owns and operates MPMF, now in its 14th year — can also be of assistance as you plot your MidPoint adventure. The 2015 MidPoint Music Festival takes place Friday-Sunday at various venues. More info/tickets:

Mark Mothersbaugh stands among works that feature his altered high-school yearbook photo.
Photo: Jesse Fox

Check out the visual art of Devo's Mark Mothersbaugh in MYOPIA at the CAC

“Cincinnati, in some ways, was the start of me being an artist,” says Mark Mothersbaugh, relaxing as best he can, given his constantly enthused, exuberant state, in a meeting room at downtown’s Contemporary Arts Center. “So there’s something about coming back here that is this completion of a cycle.” In the building on this day, much is going on that is about him. The CAC is preparing to open (at 8 p.m. Friday to the general public) its much-anticipated exhibit, Myopia. The show, curated by Adam Lerner of Denver’s Museum of Contemporary Art, looks at the Akron, Ohio native’s career as a visual artist/designer, as well as his accomplishments as a co-founder and lead singer of the Post-Punk/Art-Rock band Devo and subsequently as an in-demand composer for film and television, creating music for such Wes Anderson movies as The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou and Rushmore, as well as The Lego Movie, Pee-Wee’s Playhouse and Rugrats. Read the full feature on Mothersbaugh and Myopia here. Myopia opens at the CAC 8 p.m. Friday and continues through Jan. 9. Visit for more information.

Photo: Provided
Drink a beer at CLIFTONFEST

The fourth-annual CliftonFest promises the ultimate Clifton experience — casual, eclectic and local. Throughout the weekend, attendees can enjoy local eats from food trucks and restaurants; dance to live music from the likes of Wade Baker, Baoku and The Image Afro Beat band and Elementree Livity Project; run a 5k through Burnet Woods; shop neighborhood stores; interact with street artists and circus performers; watch a costumed pet parade on Sunday; and even throw back a cold one at the festival beer tent. 6-10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Free. Gaslight District, Ludlow Avenue, Clifton,

Drink more beer at NEWPORT OKTOBERFEST

Newport Oktoberfest, purported to be the most authentic Oktoberfest in Greater Cincinnati, kicks off Friday. Modeled after Munich’s fest, this event features everything German, from giant tents and authentic German cuisine to live folk dancing, continuous live German music and tons of beer. 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. Riverboat Row, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Hannibal the Cannibal makes his musical debut in SILENCE! THE MUSICAL

Of course you know The Silence of the Lambs, the creepy movie about “Hannibal the Cannibal.” It was a big hit in 1991 with Anthony Hopkins as the brilliant, manipulative serial killer and Jodie Foster as the young FBI cadet who recruits him to help her catch a different psychopath. Well, wouldn’t you know that someone turned it into Silence! The Musical, an award winner at the 2005 New York International Fringe Festival? It’s become a cult favorite, and the parody-loving folks at Falcon Theatre have landed it after several years of hot pursuit. Bon appetit! Through Oct. 10. $15-$20. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky., 513-479-6783,

The Michael Lowe Collection: Installation 1
Photo: Provided
Check out modern art in the closing reception for THE MICHAEL LOWE COLLECTION

The Art Academy of Cincinnati provides a rare opportunity to view artwork from the collection of local collector/dealer Michael Lowe. Much of Lowe’s diverse collection features radical, reductive and revisionist art from the 1960s and 1970s, firmly rooted in Minimal, Post-Minimal and Conceptual art, which helped to define the 20th-century avant-garde. Lowe’s exhibition, which features world-renowned artists like Sol LeWitt, Christo, Gilbert and George, Lucio Fontana and Bruce Nauman will have its closing reception this Final Friday. Closing reception: 5-9 p.m. Friday. Free. Pearlman Gallery, 1212 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine,  

Weeki Wachee Mermaids
Photo: Provided
Suspend your disbelief with the WEEKI WACHEE MERMAIDS at the Newport Aquarium

Mermaids are no longer a myth — they are a limited-time attraction at the Newport Aquarium. Watch the graceful and finned Weeki Wachee Mermaids as they swim underwater with sea creatures daily inside the aquarium’s tanks. The Weeki Wachee Mermaids, a classic roadside attraction from Weeki Wachee Springs State Park in Florida, have been swimming for more than 60 years, delighting visitors with simple magic. Through Oct. 12. Free with admission. Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Country Applefest 2014’s first-place dumplings
Photo: Blue Ribbon Kitchen
Celebrate America's favorite fruit — apples — at COUNTRY APPLEFEST

There are a couple of distinct signs that autumn has hit the Tristate: Leaves begin to fall, pumpkin spice flavor is everywhere and the cooler temperatures force hipsters to start breaking out the flannel. But the most welcome and certainly the most delicious harbingers of fall are the myriad festivals featuring our favorite recurrent foods of the season, especially the most American fruit of all: the apple. Saturday, the 33rd-annual Country Applefest will be even bigger than ever, thanks to its new location at the Warren County Fairgrounds and the addition of more than 100 vendors. “We had outgrown the downtown Lebanon area several years ago,” says Jiffy Stiles, festival chairperson, “This year we were given the opportunity to move to the fairgrounds, which gives us the space to have so many more vendors.” Read more about the festival and find a prize-winning apple dumpling recipe here. Country Applefest takes place Saturday at the Warren County Fairgrounds. More info:

Vote for your favorite fireworks at FIRE UP THE NIGHT

Fire Up the Night is an international fireworks competition over Lake Como at Coney Island featuring competitors Fantastic Fireworks of England, News de Brazil, Fireworx/Sky Lighter of Australia and a finale from local favorites, Rozzi’s Famous Fireworks. If the thrills of massive, music-synchronized fireworks shows just aren’t enough for you, admission will also include access to classic rides, a pool party and a hot air balloon show on Moonlite Mall. 4 p.m. gates; 8:30 p.m. fireworks. $30 per carload; $5 walk-ins. Coney Island, 6201 Kellogg Ave., California,

Cincinnati Street Food Festival
Photo: Provided

Dine al fresco all day during Walnut Hills’ fourth-annual Cincinnati Street Food Festival. All your favorite food trucks converge on East McMillan Street for you to snack your way through lunch or dinner by-the-truck, complete with local craft beer, live music and family-friendly fun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Free admission. E. McMillan Street between Hemlock and Chatham streets, Walnut Hills,

Cincy Summer Streets
Photo: via Facebook
Play in traffic-less streets during OTR's CINCY SUMMER STREETS

The final Cincy Summer Streets event of the season takes over Pleasant Street in Over-the-Rhine. The street will be shut to car traffic, allowing humans to play. The pedestrian party features free activities, including a climbing wall, mini golf, lawn bowling, life-size paint-by-numbers, yoga and dancing. Stroll the street, chat with neighbors, support local businesses and enjoy a Saturday afternoon in OTR. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Pleasant Street between Washington Park and Findlay Market, Over-the-Rhine,

Ohio Renaissance Festival
Photo: Will Thorpe Photography
Step back in time at the OHIO RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL
The Ohio Renaissance Festival is back and bringing fall weekends filled with costumes, turkey legs, mulled mead, jousting, games, glass-blowing demonstrations, choirs, crafts and tarot readings inside a 30-acre, recreated 16th-century village. This weekend is opening weekend, so tickets for adults are buy-one-get-one, and kids under 12 get in free. Be sure to check the website for themed weekends and different deals. Nerds of all kinds welcome — just remember that any medieval weapons you might bring need to be tied in a sheath at all times. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays (and Labor Day). Through Oct. 25. $21.95 adult; $9.95 child; $119.95 season pass. 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville,

Dine and dance during the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra's OPENING NIGHT GALA
The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra kicks off its season with a weekend of events, featuring performances of Hector Berlioz’s psychedelic Symphonie fantastique, a tale of “opium, obsession, murder, fantasy (and) hell,” says CSO conductor Louis  Langrée. Before Saturday’s performance, there will be a themed gala with dinner and cocktails in Music Hall’s Ballroom, and an afterparty with desserts, drinks, DJs and dancing. Sunday’s performance will feature a “Stories in Concert” event, in which Langrée shares the story of Berlioz’s life to give listeners a new perspective on his work. 11 a.m. Friday; 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Concert tickets start at $12; Gala: $200; afterparty: $50; Stories in Concert: $25. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

'Zory's Stories: The Other Side of Music Hall'
Photo: Matthew Zory
See the other side of Music Hall in ZORY'S STORIES
Matthew Zory, besides being a bassist for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, is a photographer with an interest in images that convey a narrative about the neighborhoods surrounding Music Hall and the greater city. A show of his work, Zory’s Stories: The Other Side of Music Hall, opens Friday at Wash Park Art gallery. As part of the event, Ellen Ruth Harrison has composed a piece for Zory to play on bass, “The Window,” and poet Donald Bogen will read from his work. The performance times will most likely be at 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. Opening reception: 5:30-9 p.m. Friday. Through Oct. 25. Free. Wash Park Art, 1215 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,


The Wood Brothers
Photo: Alysse Gafkjen
THE WOOD BROTHERS head to 20th Century Theater

Brothers Chris and Oliver Wood grew up in Colorado surrounded by the campfire music of their father and the storytelling poetics of their mother. So it was no surprise that both ended up as successful creatives, although, despite their shared roots, they didn’t work together for a significant portion of their careers. Oliver started his music career playing guitar and touring alongside Blues/Rock artist Tinsley Ellis before founding his own group, the Blues and Funk powerhouse King Johnson. Chris, on the other hand, studied and mastered Jazz bass, which led to him co-founding one of today’s most popular and highly acclaimed contemporary Jazz acts, Medeski Martin & Wood. Read more about The Wood Brothers in this week's Sound Advice. See The Wood Brothers with Gill Landry Sunday at 20th Century Theater. More info/tickets:

Luna Gale
Photo: Ryan Kurtz
LUNA GALE offers no easy answers at Ensemble Theatre
Ensemble Theatre doesn’t pull any punches with the opener for its 30th season. Artistic director D. Lynn Meyers is passionate about shows that tell us about the world in which we live, and Luna Gale is a tough but necessary reminder about how hard it is to do the right thing. Annie Fitzpatrick turns in another memorable ETC performance, this time as a caring but overextended social worker trying to deal with a baby caught in a tug-of-war between 19-year-old parents with drug issues and a religiously judgmental grandmother. No heroes, no villains — and no easy answers in this award-winning drama. Through Sept 27. $28-$44. Ensemble Theatre, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-421-3555,

Drink a sarsaparilla at the OLD WEST FEST
If you have a pair of cowboy boots laying around that you’ve been meaning to break out, you’re in luck — Old West Fest is back for its eighth year, featuring an authentic recreated Old West Dodge-City-style town, with gold panning, covered-wagon rides, kids activities, live entertainment (including trick riding and a saloon show) and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Through Oct. 18. $12 adults; $6 ages 6-12; free under 12. 1449 Greenbush Cobb Road, Williamsburg,

Tom Dustin
Photo: Provided
Laugh along with TOM DUSTIN at Go Bananas

It’s not immediately apparent that comedian Tom Dustin is from Boston, as he doesn’t sound like the guys from Car Talk or the cast of Good Will Hunting. “Every time I get on a plane to go to another part of the country, particularly the Midwest, I make a conscious effort to sound like the locals,” he says. Usually he can pull it off — unless he has a few beers. “You can’t even understand me then. I sound like every scene in The Departed.” While in Cincinnati, Dustin will be recording a CD. “I’ve been told my act is kind of mean, but I pull it off in a likeable way.” Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery,

Art Off Pike
Photo: Provided
Stroll local arts and crafts at ART OFF PIKE
The 11th-annual Art Off Pike is an urban arts festival that transforms Covington’s Seventh Street into an art walk full of performance works, installations and live music, with added food trucks and beer. The work of more than 60 local and regional emerging artists will be showcased and available for purchase. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. Seventh Street between Madison and Washington streets, Covington, Ky.,

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (9/11-9/13)]]>
What do The Pretenders, Pink Floyd, The Clash, The Sex Pistols, Motörhead, Culture Club, T. Rex, Nick Lowe, Naz Nomad and the Nightmares, Goth Rock, The Lords of the New Church, The Sisters of Mercy, Miami Vice, The Young Ones, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones have in common? They all have a one-degree-of-separation connection to The Damned, one of Great Britain’s most renowned and durable Punk bands, touring this year on the eve of its almost inconceivable 40th anniversary. For anyone who would doubt the legitimacy of The Damned’s place in Punk history, the group’s early credentials speak for themselves. The Damned play Friday at Bogarts. More info/tickets:

Harvest Home Fair
Photo: J. Klug
End your summer at the 156th-annual Harvest Home Fair. The fest opens Thursday with a parade, followed by various contests, including a flower show, art show and horse show, live music, a cooking demonstration by Buddy LaRosa and a Dog Walk and Mutt Mingle on Sunday. Other attractions include the 4-H petting zoo, auto show, cooking and baking exhibitions, carnival rides and games and a playground. 6-11 p.m. Thursday; 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday; noon-10 p.m. Sunday. $5 adults; free children under 1; free admission Sunday until 3:30 p.m. Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Cheviot-Westwood,

Kevin McDonald
Photo: Leif Norma
Calling all comedy fans: OTRimprov, a local sketch group dedicated to creating a strong improv community in Cincinnati, will host its second Improv Festival Cincinnati at the Know Theatre to fête the group’s fifth anniversary. The four-day fest will feature improv acts from around the country in addition to workshops in storytelling, sketch writing and more. Emmy-nominated comedian Kevin McDonald of Kids in the Hall (see also: That 70s Show, Arrested Development) is headlining. Thursday-Sunday. $15-$35 single day/evening; $75 all-access pass; $65 weekend pass. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine,

MainStrasse Oktoberfest
Photo: Matthew Andrews
Oktoberfest season in Cincinnati rolls on with MainStrasse’s Oktoberfest celebration this weekend. The festivities kick off Friday evening with a ceremonial keg tapping at Goose Girl Fountain with the German American Citizens League and affiliated sister organizations, followed by live German music, German food and other family-friendly entertainment. 5-11:30 p.m. Friday; noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. MainStrasse Village, Covington, Ky.,

Cincy Beerfest
From the people who bring you the Cincy Winter Beerfest at the Convention Center comes Cincy Beerfest, an outdoor brew fest on Fountain Square. It’s a craft beer block party with live music, more than 250 craft beers (local and national) and food trucks. Friday and Saturday. $15-$45; $10 DD. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown,

Head to Ault Park for a beer festival featuring craft beers from across the nation, including MadTree, Dogfish Head, Revolution and more. 6:30-10:30 p.m. $25; includes 20 tastings. Ault Park, Observatory Ave., Hyde Park,

Celebrate Clinton County’s agricultural heritage with a three-day festival of corn. The fest features antique farm machinery, parade games, a quilt show, live music, all types of food made from corn and the Corn Olympics. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. $4-$7. Clinton County Fairgrounds, 958 W. Main St., Wilmington,

The Food Wine Classic descends on Washington Park for a weekend of dining, drinking and learning.
Photo: Provided
If Food Network and Top Chef got married and had a baby, it would be this event. Celebrate the Midwest culinary scene with grand tastings, demos, seminars, competitions, after-parties, and more. Friday-Sunday. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Cincy ComiCon
Photo: Provided
Let your nerd flag fly, Cincinnati. Cincy ComiCon is back once again to ensure comic books get their fair representation in the Queen City. Created somewhat as a response to the Cincinnati Comic Expo, whose tendency is to feature more film and TV stars than comic book creators, Cincy ComiCon is all about the writers and illustrators who bring costumed characters to life on the page. Created by Kendall Swafford of the Cheviot comic book shop Up Up & Away! and Walking Dead co-creator Tony Moore — a well-established illustrator beloved by the industry — Cincy ComiCon will feature Rick Remender (Tokyo Ghost), Mark Schultz (Xenozoic Tales) and many other panelists, booths and special guests. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $20-$50. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington, Ky.,

'The Secret Garden'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
Blake Robison is the guy who makes the artistic decisions at the Playhouse in the Park, and he’s committed to shows that appeal across generations. He says The Secret Garden is one of his favorite musicals. “So many stories with child protagonists are cutesy and saccharine. Not so in The Secret Garden,” he says. Mary Lennox, 10, is a selfish, spoiled orphan in Victorian England put in the care of an unhappy uncle in a remote British manor. In the midst of unhappiness and loneliness, a secret garden becomes a place of healing for several characters. It’s a powerful show, full of deep, complex emotions and great music. Through Oct. 3. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888,

Head to the Hofbräuhaus for a stein-holding competition, keg and pretzel toss, circus acts, face painting and bier, bier, bier. Saturday and Sunday. Free. 200 E. Third St., Newport, Ky.,

The Galloping Pig
Photo: The Bowtie Foundation
If you’re feeling generous and a bit British, then look no further to satisfy your anglophilic desires. The 2015 Galloping Pig looks to raise funds through the BowTie Foundation toward the education of underprivileged youth as patrons gather to watch the Cincinnati Polo Club square off in an exhibition match. But there’s more than just the polo match: Attendees will pet horses, meet the polo players, hit some balls, drink, eat and dance to live music. Summer dresses and bowties are recommended apparel. 11:30 p.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. $20; $125 VIP. Wilshire Farm, 6065 Goshen Road, Goshen,

Cincinnati Hispanic Fest
Photo: Provided
The Cincinnati Hispanic Fest highlights the food, music, dance, sports, art and culture of local Hispanic communities. The main stage features more than 15 musical acts over the course of the two-day event, along with cultural dancing performances, a Festival Queen competition, live mass and a free showing of the film Cesar Chavez on Saturday and Sunday. Noon-11 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $1 walk in; $8 per car. Hamilton County Fairgrounds 7820 Vine St., Carthage,

Photo: Provided
Take to the streets for Milford’s annual Longstone Street Festival. Get your fill of live music, food, games and arts and crafts at this 12-hour, family-friendly event. A live music stage will host nine bands throughout the day, including Folk, Funk, Soul, Bluegrass, Americana and Alt Rockers, including headliners Seabird. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. 200 Main St., Milford,

This festival includes Indian food, shopping, games, pony rides, fireworks from Rozzi’s and a Naach Sitare Indian dancing competition. Noon-8 p.m. Free admission. The Hindu Temple of Greater Cincinnati, 4920 Klatte Road, Summerside,

The 17th-annual Art & Wine Festival features the work of more than 60 area artists, live music, a grape-stomping competition, food, draft beer and wine from Vinoklet. Noon-11 p.m. Saturday; 1-8 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Colerain,

Braxton is supporting Bridgette Hightower in her mission to wipe out blood cancer with a flip-cup tournament. Event includes a costume contest, Strong’s Brick Oven Pizzeria, split-the-pot, door prizes and more. Proceeds benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Check-in starts at 2 p.m. $125 for teams of $5; $1 pints of Sparky; $6 pizzas. 27 W. Seventh St., Covington, Ky., 859-261-5600. 

MadTree beer, music from Mike Wade & the Mighty Groovers, Ron D’s BBQ, Just Q’in, games for kids, an art mart and more. 3-8 p.m. Free admission. Madison and Whetsel, Madisonville,

Woodstone Creek celebrates the season with wine, mead and craft spirits, plus tastings of apple and brandy wine. Includes five samples. 2-7 p.m. $12. Woodstone Creek Winery & Distillery, 4712 Vine St., Saint Bernard, 513-569-0300.

Los Lobos
Photo: David Alan Kogut
Los Lobos began making music back when Richard Nixon was still in office. For the historically illiterate, that’s more than 40 years, during which the Los Angeles crew has put forth its distinctive sounds — from slanted Tex-Mex and Folk to straight-up Country and Rock — via more than a dozen studio albums and a variety of EPs, live records and side projects. The band is still probably best known in the mainstream for its take on Ritchie Valens’ “La Bamba,” from the 1988 biopic of the same name. Which is unfortunate, because it’s the least interesting thing Los Lobos has done. Los Lobos plays Sunday at Taft Theatre. More info/tickets:

Luna Gale
Photo: Ryan Kurtz
This year marks Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati’s 30th anniversary. It was launched in 1986 to support local professional artists, driven by strong faith in the transformative power of the arts to create sustainable communities. Its founders, David A. White III and Jeff Seibert, pulled together a corps of local actors and aspiring theater professionals and assembled two seasons that were presented at Memorial Hall. Luna Gale tells the story of a social worker who meets two teenage drug addicts accused of neglecting their baby. Luna Gale continues through Sept. 27 at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati. More info/tickets:

Cincinnati Landmark Productions’ 'A Chorus Line'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
The dancers who back up Broadway productions are called “gypsies.” They lead anonymous lives, but they’re passionate, dedicated performers. They got their star turn in A Chorus Line, a 1975 show about a group of performers competing for spots in the company of a new production. The show was based on composites of real people, but it features some of Broadway’s greatest musical theater numbers. With songs by Marvin Hamlisch — especially “One Singular Sensation” — the show danced off with nine Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize. It ran on Broadway for more than two decades. It’s a great choice to open Covedale’s 2015-2016 season. Through Sept. 27. $21-$24. Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glendale Ave., Covedale, 513-241-6550,

If you have a pair of cowboy boots laying around that you’ve been meaning to break out, you’re in luck — Old West Fest is back for its eighth year, featuring an authentic recreated Old West Dodge-City-style town, with gold panning, covered-wagon rides, kids activities, live entertainment (including trick riding and a saloon show) and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Through Oct. 18. $12 adults; $6 ages 6-12; free under 12. 1449 Greenbush Cobb Road, Williamsburg,

Ohio Renaissance Festival
Photo: Will Thorpe Photography
The Ohio Renaissance Festival is back and bringing fall weekends filled with costumes, turkey legs, mulled mead, jousting, games, glass-blowing demonstrations, choirs, crafts and tarot readings inside a 30-acre, recreated 16th-century village. This weekend is opening weekend, so tickets for adults are buy-one-get-one, and kids under 12 get in free. Be sure to check the website for themed weekends (like Time Travelers Weekend Sept. 12; where’s your fez?) and different deals. Nerds of all kinds welcome — just remember that any medieval weapons you might bring need to be tied in a sheath at all times. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays (and Labor Day). Through Oct. 25. $21.95 adult; $9.95 child; $119.95 season pass. 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville,

In art, as in life, context is key. An image that would otherwise be treated with contempt — or worse, blithe indifference — can be illuminated with only a few facts. Likewise, stripped of its context, a piece of art can become something else entirely as the viewer imagines a contextual framework for the art. This is the premise of a new photography exhibition at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Unknown Elements, which features 26 photos from the museum’s collection “about which some details are unknown.” Displayed in Gallery 212, the photographs range in date from the mid-19th century to the present day and are accompanied by written works from local writers — poems, short stories and other responses paired to selected images to serve as a “prompt” for viewers’ own reflections. Unknown Elements is on display at the Cincinnati Art Museum through Nov. 8. More info:

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (8/28-8/30)]]> FRIDAY


Mothersbaugh Mania officially kicks off in Cincinnati on Friday when Mark Mothersbaugh — the co-founder of the great Post-Punk band DEVO, as well as an accomplished visual artist who studied his craft at Kent State University — appears at Woodward Theater for a concert sponsored by the Contemporary Arts Center. (The CAC is opening a highly anticipated retrospective of his artwork, Myopia, on Sept. 25.) Friday’s show will begin with a small orchestral group playing DEVO covers and Mothersbaugh’s scores for Wes Anderson movies, followed by a short “onstage dialogue,” and will conclude with him conducting an ensemble in “Music for Six Sided Keyboard” (pictured). 8 p.m. Friday. $60 seated; $30 standing. Woodward Theater, 1404 Main St., Over-the-Rhine,

Third Eye Blind
Photo: Big Hassle
Ever wondered what Blue Ash tastes like? Find out this weekend. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, Taste of Blue Ash features food from more than a dozen area restaurants (Delicio’s Coal Fired Pizza, Alfio’s Buon Cibo, Café Mediterranean, Mama Mimi’s and more), a craft beer tent, festival rides, strolling entertainers and special headlining musical performances from Third Eye Blind (’90s nostalgia, please never end) on Saturday and Thompson Square on Sunday. 6-11 p.m. Friday; 2-11 p.m. Saturday; 2-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. Summit Park, 4335 Glendale-Milford Road, Blue Ash,

Joel Sternfeld’s photo accompanies Kathy Y. Wilson’s piece.
Photo: Cincinnati Art Museum, FotoFocus Art Purchase Fund
Art After Dark celebrates the Cincinnati Art Museum’s new exhibit, Unknown Elements, which highlights anonymous photographs from the museum collection, paired with contemplative writings from local authors. The evening includes docent-led tours, a Hip Hop dance performance from Elementz, spoken-word and Short Order Poetry from Chase Public in the courtyard. 5-9 p.m. Friday. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, 

Germania Society Oktoberfest
Photo: Provided
Get your fill of cream puffs, dirndls and Warsteiner at the Germania Society’s 45th-annual Oktoberfest — Cincinnati’s “original and most authentic Oktoberfest,” full of the best parts of local German culture, crafts and cooking. Tents serving an array of dishes like strudel, sauerkraut, schnitzel and sauerbraten will line the streets (and your plate), with more than 60 taps of both authentic and domestic beers, along with Bavarian schnapps. Guests can enjoy live music, German dance groups, carnival rides, games and a vacation raffle. Guten appetit! 6 p.m.-midnight Friday; 2 p.m.-midnight Saturday; noon-10 p.m. Sunday. $4. Germania Park, 3529 W. Kemper Road, Colerain,

Lily & Madeleine
Photo: Julien Bourgeois 
Lily & Madeleine might be considered Indianapolis’ answer to Over the Rhine. Though there is an obvious age and experience difference  — Lily & Madeleine were just teenage sisters when their first records, the EP Weight of the Globe and a self-titled album, came out in 2013 — there is striking similarity in other ways.  Both acts are primarily Americana-oriented singer/songwriter duos whose female singers deliver hauntingly lovely, introspective vocals on melancholia-tinged ballads and mid-tempo compositions. Lily & Madeleine play Madison live with Shannon Hayden and The Mitchells Friday. More info/tickets:

Napoleon Maddox and Aiesha Little of the Midwest Black Speculative Fiction Alliance
Photo: Jesse Fox

Comic book fans are a colorful lot, quite like the books themselves. This Saturday, the St. Bernard branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County is honoring a historically underrepresented group in comic book culture: black writers, illustrators and readers. It’s part of an event called Queen City Black Comix Day, which was organized by Aiesha Little of the Midwest Black Speculative Fiction Alliance (MBSFA).  “We’re focusing on indie creators and illustrators because there’s a vibrant world outside of ‘the Big Two’ of DC and Marvel,” Little says. “Indie comics offer a larger variety of narratives, genres and viewpoints, and I think kids and adults alike need to see that.” Black Comix Day takes place Saturday at the St. Bernard branch of the public library. More info: 


The Kennedy Heights Arts Center, one of the best and most ambitious in the region, takes a great leap forward this weekend when it opens its new 10,500-square-foot annex in a portion of an old Kroger grocery store.  The overall site has been christened the Kennedy Heights Cultural Campus because the building also holds the Kennedy Heights Montessori School in addition to the arts center’s Lindner Annex. “This expansion will allow us not only to expand our programs to include digital art forms, but also to have a big open space for different kinds of performing arts and to host performances and concerts,” said Ellen Muse-Lindeman, the arts center’s executive director, during a recent tour of the addition. The Raise the Heights art parade and festival takes place 11 a.m-5 p.m. Saturday. More info:

Starlit Picnic
Photo: Even Noga


Romance will be waiting at the Cincinnati Observatory’s first adults-only Starlit Picnic. Grab a blanket, packed picnic-dinner, drinks and a date and settle in for a special night. “This is kind of a little bit fancier, more adults-only, where people can bring their own drinks,” says Dean Regas, outreach astronomer at the observatory. “They can watch as the sun goes down on one side of the sky and watch the moon come up on the other side.” Telescopes are available, and astronomers will guide guests through a viewing of the heavenly lights. Bring flashlights and candles to set the mood. 7-10 p.m. Saturday. $30. Cincinnati Observatory, 3489 Observatory Place, Mount Lookout,

Jane Decker
Photo: Provided


Jane Decker is just barely into official adulthood, but she’s lived a virtual lifetime of experiences, both personally and professionally. Her supportive mother and father encouraged her musical pursuits, and she was writing songs by age 10 — about the time both her parents received cancer diagnoses. Two years later, her father passed away and Decker recorded her first songs. Three years after that, the Cincinnati-based vocalist joined her first band, a blistering Punk outfit called Formulas, but she began therapeutically writing distinctly non-Punk songs. Her brother John offered to pay for her to record those artier songs and enlisted friends to help. Formulas broke up, Decker’s mother’s cancer went into remission and the stage was set for a fresh chapter. Read a full feature on Decker here. Jane Decker plays a free 1:30 p.m. show Saturday at Washington Park’s Taste of OTR. More info: 

Taste of OTR
Photo: Tender Mercies


The third-annual Taste of OTR is a family-friendly day of food, craft beer and live entertainment in Washington Park to benefit Tender Mercies, a nonprofit in the heart of Over-the-Rhine that provides housing to homeless adults living with mental illness and a variety of supportive services. Things kick off at 11 a.m. with a performance from Mamadrones and continue well into the night with more local music from the likes of Jane Decker, the Comet Bluegrass All-Stars, Multimagic and more. And fill your belly with food from an entire slew of local faves, like Eli’s BBQ, Kaze, Cincy by the Slice, The Chili Hut, Dojo Gelato, Taste of Belgium, MOTR Pub — the list goes on and on — while sipping on local craft brews. VIP tickets include deck seating and select special tastings. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday. Tastings $1-$6; VIP $50; $60 door. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, 

Red Bull Soapbox Race
Photo: Provided


Red Bull — known for hosting relatively creative and dangerous events like their Flugtag, where people build their own flying machines and participate in a competition involving flinging themselves off of tall things — has been bringing the joys of soapbox derby-ing to Mount Adams for several years. The competition consists of both design and creativity judging panels for the derby contestants’ vehicles and a daring timed race through Eden Park, routinely loaded with epic crashes and glorious triumphs from the charmingly unique homemade vehicles, built from materials ranging from cardboard to steel. 11 a.m. Saturday. Free. Eden Park, 950 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, 


Grab the kids and head to the Cincinnati Museum Center for Mini Maker Faire, a celebration of creativity and invention spread across the rotunda, the center’s three museums and outside. This two-day show-and-tell features “makers” ranging from techies and crafters to homesteaders, scientists and garage tinkerers, all with the goal of entertaining, informing, connecting and growing community. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Museum admission required. Cincinnati Museum Center, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate,


'Fear the Walking Dead'
Photo: Justin Lubin, AMC


With the undeniable success of AMC’s The Walking Dead, it makes sense that the network would produce a spinoff. Fear the Walking Dead promises zombie-apocalypse action in the fictional universe fans have come to love, with a different setting, cast and timeline. So we move from years into the outbreak in Georgia (or, more recently, Virginia) to the very beginning in Los Angeles. Last week’s pilot might be deemed “slow” by some because the action and bloodshed was so minimal compared to the original series, but this companion is all about exploring the early days of this zombie virus — what happened right before the world turned upside down. That’s a huge chunk of the apocalyptic timeline we missed out on in TWD, as we experienced everything via Rick Grimes, who was in a coma for about a month when the fallout began. And Fear’s vision of the first cracks in society is intriguing. The show focuses on a blended family: High school counselor Madison and her children — Alicia, a laidback college-bound intellectual, and Nick, a troubled drug addict — and her English-teacher boyfriend Travis (whose ex-wife and son made a short appearance last week). Clearly this modern family dynamic will present realistic problems, like where to go when the world ends and your family is scattered across the city. 9 p.m. Sundays. AMC.

'The Complete Tom'
Photo: Provided


Some theater al fresco? Queen City Flash is a flash-mob theater company working its way through Mark Twain’s adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn with imaginative, pop-up performances in local parks. This month they conclude their spirited four-part adaptation with Detective. Huck and Tom’s adventure involves solving a murder to clear an innocent friend. Tickets are free, but reserved in advance for a date and time. On the performance day, ticket-holders are emailed a map and parking instructions. Getting there — maybe to a Cincinnati park you’ve never visited — is part of the fun. As is the lively show. 7:30 p.m. daily. Through Monday. Free; reservations required. Locations vary,


In art, as in life, context is key. An image that would otherwise be treated with contempt — or worse, blithe indifference — can be illuminated with only a few facts. Likewise, stripped of its context, a piece of art can become something else entirely as the viewer imagines a contextual framework for the art. This is the premise of a new photography exhibition at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Unknown Elements, which features 26 photos from the museum’s collection “about which some details are unknown.” Displayed in Gallery 212, the photographs range in date from the mid-19th century to the present day and are accompanied by written works from local writers — poems, short stories and other responses paired to selected images to serve as a “prompt” for viewers’ own reflections. Unknown Elements is on display at the Cincinnati Art Museum through Nov. 8. More info:

'A Hundred Minus One Day'
Photo: Provided


For two summers, John Leo Muething has presented Stone on a Walk, his low-budget theater company offering “short, sweet and cheap” shows. His goal is for you to walk away after an hour’s performance saying, “That was sweet.” 2015’s final production is the U.S. premiere of a touching comedy by Idgie Beau, an Edinburgh Fringe hit in 2013 about youthful innocence and living in the moment. The title — A Hundred Minus One Day — is from A.A. Milne: “If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day, so I never have to live without you.” Through Aug. 29. $10. Simple Space, 16 E. 13th St., Over-the-Rhine, 

<![CDATA[Weekenders: What We're Doing This Weekend]]>
Each week CityBeat staffers share their weekend plans: from dinner and drinks or special events to out-of-town concerts and stories we're working on. And some of us just watch TV.

Maria Seda-Reeder: Friday night I will be checking out the work of Elise Thompson & Nathan Weikert at Boom Gallery in Evanston. I’ll head with the family to either MadTree’s taproom for some Catch a Fire Pizza or Mazunte Tacos because pizza or tacos are basically what we live on. Saturday I have a friend’s overnight bachelorette party in Batesville, Ind., so I will be lazing on a floatie in the middle of a lake all day with a bunch of ladies I adore — which sounds like heaven! But if I were still in town, I would be headed straight for C. Jacqueline Wood’s excellent continuing series of avant garde film screenings for her Mini Microcinema, Unbundled Detroit at People’s Liberty’s Globe Gallery.  The (FREE!) Saturday screenings have been way less packed than the Thursday evenings, and the films being shown are consistently awesome. If I get home in time on Sunday morning, I will be sure to attend Wave Pool’s Artist in Residence, Stairwell’s first two-hour Field Trip, “Head Over Hills”, a group walking tour exploring the steps around Eden Park and the Cincinnati Art Museum. I had a chance to meet and walk around town with the two artists, Sarah Hotchkiss and Carey Lin, this past week for several hours and they will be doing some really cool things to engage tour-goers with art, while they’re in town for the next few weeks.

Zack Hatfield: After reading CityBeat's article on iced coffee brews, I might have to head out to Trailhead or Deeper Roots and see what the fuss is all about. Then I'll migrate on my caffeinated iceberg over to By This River, the semi-new exhibit at the Weston gallery. Since I'm visiting my folks on the Westside this weekend, I'd like to visit Habesha, an Ethiopian restaurant I've never been to before. 

Jesse Fox: Saturday I'm heading to Columbus to CD102.5's Summerfest to see FIDLAR and Bully with a few friends.  We'll be making the most important stop of all beforehand at Dirty Frank's, where I'll probably eat too many veggie dogs to even be able to have fun at the show. Other than that, I don't have a lot going on ... lazy weekend for me!

Sarah Urmston: Since Friday is my sweet friend Alexa's birthday, we will be having brunch at Collective Espresso in the beautiful Contemporary Art Center, celebrating with mimosas, pretty scenery and great company. Later that night we will be dancing our butts off all over OTR, most likely shakin' it to John Lennon's Twist & Shout at Japp's Since 1879. Saturday I'll be spending money I don't have at the City Flea (!!!) because we're lucky enough to have it TWICE this month! The rest of the day I'll be paintballing, something I'm still really confused about. Either way, I'm ready to kick some ass and pray to God we're getting drinks afterward. Finally, Sunday afternoon will be dedicated to packing because I move to the beautiful heart of Covington only a week from today! This weekend is a busy one, but exciting nonetheless. 


Grace Potter 
Photo: Hollywood Records
Grace Potter’s rise in the music world has been steady. She has toughed it out with tour after tour for years, opening for and collaborating with artists like Derek Trucks, Warren Haynes and others. But now Potter is entering a new phase in her career; after years of being billed as “Grace Potter and The Nocturnals,” Potter is now a solo artist. And she’s jumped right into the role. In June, she opened two stadium shows for The Rolling Stones. And on Aug. 14, Potter is set to release her first solo album, Midnight. Grace Potter plays Friday at Taft Theatre. Tickets/more info:

Jill Scott
Photo: Atlantic Records
Founded in 1962 as the all-Jazz Ohio Valley Jazz Festival, Cincinnati’s popular “Jazz Fest” has gone through a lot of changes in its half century-plus history. In more recent decades, the festival shifted focus to R&B and Soul acts and, even more recently, moved into the Bengals’ Paul Brown Stadium. This year, the fest also has a new name — Cincinnati Music Festival (the past few years it was called the Macy’s Music Festival) — but it is providing the same high-quality R&B acts over two nights. This year’s lineup features modern favorites like Maxwell, Jill Scott (pictured) and Jennifer Hudson, plus old-school crowd-pleasers Maze featuring Frankie Beverly and The O’Jays. This year’s fest also features up-and-comers like Avery Sunshine, Mali Music and Luke James. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $55-$125. Paul Brown Stadium, 1 Paul Brown Stadium, Downtown,

It seems today that all you see are sex-crazed talking teddy bears in movies and lewd cartoons on TV. But where are those good, old-fashioned crooners on which we used to rely? Luckily, there’s Seth MacFarlane.The creative mind responsible for the Ted movies, A Million Ways to Die in the West, American Dad and Family Guy (among myriad other contributions to film and television) is now on a limited tour of the country, showcasing his vocal talent as the frontman of a swingin’ Big Band; in Cincinnati, he’ll be backed by the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra, conducted by John Morris Russell. Seth MacFarlane performs with the Cincinnati Pops Friday at Riverbend’s PNC Pavilion. More info:

It’s a rare opportunity — or should we say medium rare — that carnivores can delight in $5 gourmet and off-menu burgers throughout their city. Through Sunday, Cincinnati Burger Week pays homage to the American-cuisine staple by having chefs prepare burgers with their unique spin. Local restaurants from Anderson to Covington will participate in the beef extravaganza, organized by CityBeat, stamping your Burger Passports for special prizes. Don’t eat meat? Some places, like Nation in Pendleton, also offer a delectable black bean patty. Through Sunday. $5 per burger. Find participating restaurants at

Hot on the heels of SCOTUS’ landmark decision to legalize gay marriage nationwide (s/o to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg),, a compendium of LGBTQ+-friendly wedding vendors in the area, decided to turn their launch party into an entire weekend of activities, featuring eight parties over three days with more than 40 different sponsors. Events include Cocktails & Couture at Bromwell’s, a Sunday Jazz brunch at the Hilton Netherland Plaza, a dance party at Ivy Lounge and much more. Weekend events open to everyone; Scalia fans maybe stay away. All proceeds benefit Pride Cincinnati, Equality Ohio and the Human Rights Campaign. Friday and Saturday. Various prices; $40 weekend. Details at

Joan Jett
Photo: Roger Erickson
For all the grumbling about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the induction ceremonies can often be revelatory and moving, occasionally serving as a way to view an artist from a different perspective and remind everyone why an artist is receiving the honor in the first place. The 2015 Rock Hall inductions had its fair share of goosebump-worthy moments. But it was inductee Joan Jett’s acceptance speech that made me most emotional, reminding me of my own deep-rooted passion for music in general, and Rock & Roll specifically. Joan Jett & The Blackhearts play Friday at the Lawrenceburg Event Center (Hollywood Casino). More info/tickets:

Amiable Strangers
Photo: Provided
Painters Elise Thompson and Nathan Weikert exhibit new work at Boom Gallery in Evanston, which demonstrates their move away from figurative painting toward something more abstracted, taking cues from the American AbEx tradition. Thompson’s paintings are done on unconventional materials — forgoing canvas for chiffon, for example — and the painter hangs her work on walls, some pieces extending onto the floor or leaning on themselves in unlikely ways. Weikert, for his part, creates atmosphere and mood through the use of layers of stormy grays. Opening reception: 7-9 p.m. Friday. Free. Boom Gallery, 1940 Dana Ave.,

Fasten your seat belt — here comes the 2015-2016 theater season. Know Theatre gets bragging rights for being first out of the local theater gate with Hundred Days, a Rock & Roll show it played a significant part in developing. The Folk Rock odyssey was created by and features the husband-and-wife duo of Shaun and Abigail Bengson. It premiered at Z Space in San Francisco in February 2014. Hundred Days is the story of Sarah and Will, who fall in love only to have their time together cut tragically short by a fatal illness. Their romantic, defiant response to their fate: Compress the 60 years they had envisioned together into the 100 days they have left. Kate E. Ryan assembled the script for this powerful piece, which is an unconventional musical, Indie Rock opera and tragic romance. Hundred Days runs at Know Theatre July 24 to Aug. 22.

Death from Above 1979
Photo: Pamela Littky
It’s easy to see why bands with lengthy histories and voluminous catalogs would consider getting back together, but those rationalizations don’t hold much water for Death from Above 1979. The Canadian duo featuring bassist/synthesizer-player/backing vocalist Jesse F. Keeler and drummer/vocalist Sebastien Grainger got together in 2001 and released a sole album of original material, You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine, in 2004. The pair considered breaking up in the wake of tours with Queens of the Stone Age and Nine Inch Nails, but held off for a year to appease their rabid fans, label and inner circle. They did and a decade later they're back with a new record and new tour. Catch Death from Above 1979 Saturday at Riverbend. More info/tickets:

The Cincinnati Opera closes its season with Puccini’s Turandot, the tale of Princess Turandot, an enigmatic beauty in ancient China who reigns with an iron fist and cold heart. All of her wooers must answer her riddles to win her hand in marriage, or face certain death. When a mysterious man passes her impossible test, will she finally open her heart to love? This kaleidoscopic production features stunning sets, costumes and choreography. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 29 and 31. $35-$175. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Greater Anderson Days
Photo: Provided
Just because Independence Day is over doesn’t mean the fireworks are. The 17th-annual Greater Anderson Days, a July jamboree consisting of music, games, rides, food and an “Anderson’s Got Talent” competition, will culminate with Rozzi’s Famous Fireworks on Sunday night. The pyrotechnics are a perfect way for the family to celebrate the summer, but also the community, as money raised benefits the Anderson Parks and Recreation Playground Fund. 5-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 5-10 p.m. Sunday. Free. Beech Acres Park, 6910 Salem Road, Anderson,

Photo: Mikki Schaffner
The musical 1776 requires a cast of about two dozen strong male singers and actors to portray our founding fathers. They were a querulous bunch with opinions from all points on the political spectrum, not too different from today’s politicians, in fact. This production at the new Incline Theater has rounded up fine cast of performers, led by Rodger Pille as feisty Boston attorney John Adams, the flash point in the back-and-forth argument about whether the colonies should declare their independence from England. The show’s opening number, “Sit Down, John,” announces immediately that we will meet a crowd of very human characters. Through July 26. $26 adults; $23 students. Warsaw Federal Incline Public Theater, 801 Matson Place, Price Hill,

Those flowers in your garden are more than just aesthetically pleasing. Learn all about fragrance therapy and how to turn your blooms into potpourri during part of “6 Saturdays to Better Health” at Krohn Conservatory, in concert with their Healing Garden summer floral show. 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. Saturday. $4. 1501 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, 513-421-5707,

Watching a Florence Freedom game is fun, but it’s even more fun on a theme night. Tonight’s theme is “Halo Night.” The Freedom’s home stadium becomes ground zero as Cincinnati Comic Expo hosts an evening of cosplay with the 405th Infantry Division of the Halo costuming group. If you don’t know what Halo is, it’s a first-person shooter video game centered on an interstellar war. Freedom players will be wearing special jerseys designed to look like Master Chief, the video game’s main protagonist, which will be auctioned off after the game. 6:05 p.m. Saturday. $10-$15. UC Health Stadium, 7950 Freedom Way, Florence, Ky.,,

Edward Curtis was an early 20th-century American ethnologist and photographer who captured the disappearing world of the American Indian. In the Taft Museum’s Enduring Spirit exhibit, Curtis chronicles the living culture of Native Americans from 1900-1930 through gelatin silver photographs, cyanotypes and platinum prints, among others. Profoundly moving, the images depict everything from powerful portraits of men, women and children to Navajo riders, painted lodges and teepees, and a famous and striking image of the Nez Perce’s Chief Joseph, a crusader who led his people against the U.S. government when they were forcibly removed from their ancestral lands in the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the exhibit, check out Saturday Sounds (noon-2 p.m.) on the terrace, with live music from Full Moon Ranch. Through Sept. 20. $10 adults; $8 seniors/students; $4 youth. Taft Museum of Art, 316 Pike St., Downtown,

Photo: Mikki Schaffner
Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre opens its 34th-annual summer show this week at the Covedale Center, where 80 local teens will twist and pony their way through the raucous musical Hairspray. Set in 1962 Baltimore, it’s about a Rock & Roll TV show that represents the dream of every kid to become a star, especially lovable plus-size teen Tracy Turnblad. This big cast brings together kids from 33 area schools. Many of CYPT’s performers — there are 2,400 alumni — have gone on to theater careers. It’s a safe bet that there will be some more from this year’s crew. Through Aug. 2. $12-$16. Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre, Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., Covedale, 513-241-6550,

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (6/12-6/14)]]> FRIDAY


After a heavy second season that had many viewers wondering if drama would be a more appropriate genre designation than comedy (particularly for television awards), the ladies of Litchfield Penitentiary look to lighten things up in Season Three. Yes, Orange Is the New Black is back for your binging pleasure with a growing solid cast, and more laughs, tears and WTF moments that will continue to dance on the drama-comedy line. Orange is the New Black Season Three premieres Friday on Netflix. Read more here

Newport Italian Fest
Photo: Provided
Eat a ton of pizza at NEWPORT ITALIANFEST
Spend your evening surrounded by authentic Italian food from local restaurants including Pompilios, Roma’s and Bella Luna, with live music featuring performers from all over the nation and the “old country,” including the Italian harmony trio Tre Bella. And if that’s not enough, the 24th annual Italianfest also has a cooking contest, a pizza-eating contest, games, Rozzi’s fireworks and even rides to keep the little ones busy. 5-11 p.m. Thursday; 5-11:30 p.m. Friday; noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. Festival Park, 101 Riverboat Row, Newport, Ky.,

Photo: Provided

Discuss black photography at the CAM with a screening of THROUGH A LENS DARKLY

The Cincinnati Art Museum is partnering with the Cincinnati Film Society to present a free screening of Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People. Director Thomas Allen Harris and producer Deborah Willis will be present for a discussion. The film looks at how African-American communities have historically used the camera as a tool for social change, and it has a Cincinnati connection in its inclusion of photographer James Presley Ball, who worked here for 25 years before and after the Civil War. FotoFocus is a sponsor of the event. 7 p.m. Friday. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams,

'Calorie Accounting' author Mandy Levy
Photo: Provided

Laugh and learn some calorie control with MANDY LEVY at KAZE OTR

“Buy a thing of arugula from the store. Dump it in a bowl.” This is the beginning of Mandy Levy’s Buffauxlo Chicken Salad recipe from her new book Calorie Accounting: The Foolproof Diet-by-Numbers Plan for a Skinnier New You, a humorous and self-deprecating weight-loss book that feels more like your best friend telling you about her new meal plan than your typical holier-than-thou diet tome. Levy consciously nudges the concept toward something more lighthearted. “It takes itself so seriously, the dieting world,” she says. “And I just wanted everybody to lighten up.” CityBeat recently caught up with Levy via phone as she was driving from Austin to Phoenix on her current Calorie Accountingbook tour, which makes two stops in the Queen City this week. Read the interview here. Mandy Levy’s Calorie Accounting tour makes a stop 5:30 p.m. Friday at Kaze in Over-the-Rhine and 2 p.m. Sunday at Barnes & Noble West Chester. More info:

Photo: Courtney Yip

Head to Fountain Square for MidPoint Indie Summer and BRONCHO

Over the past five years, Broncho has ridden its love of ’70s Punk and ’80s Indie Rock to a press kit full of praise and the kind of fairly high-profile song placements that couldn’t help but broaden its loyal fan base. Broncho’s fortunes have continued to rise, with the first album’s “Try Me Out Sometime” being used in a commercial for HBO’s Now streaming service and “Class Historian” from the new album finding its way into an ad for Kate Hudson’s Fabletic lifestyle brand. The largely enthusiastic reviews for Just Enough Hip to Be Woman have paid dividends in the form of high-visibility bookings, including slots at Austin, Texas’ Fun Fun Fun Fest and the ever-popular Bonnaroo Festival, which the band plays the day before its stop at Fountain Square for the free MidPoint Indie Summer series. So the Broncho members may not be completely well-rested when they blow into town, but they’ll be well-primed. Read more hereBroncho performs Friday with Kopecky, Coconut Milk and Near Earth Objects. Concert begins 7 p.m.; Broncho takes the stage at 9 p.m. Fountain Square, 520 Vine Street, Downtown,

Cincinnati’s Happy Maladies celebrate their new self-titled album release this Friday.
Photo: Michael Wilson

THE HAPPY MALADIES celebrate a record release at Woodward Theater

Even a cursory listen to The Happy Maladies’ slim but impressive Chamber Folk-meets-Indie-in-Jazztown catalog reveals a certain thoughtful deliberation. But the question of sonic intent regarding the imminent new self-titled album by the Cincinnati band sparks an answer nearly as contemplative as the group’s sound. From their 2008 start, The Happy Maladies have exhibited a casual intensity, giving the sense that the quartet creates from a combination of diligence and offhandedness. While their Indie Rock approach to structured music is largely intact, the new album’s process was slightly different. Read an interview with the band hereThe Happy Maladies play Woodward Theater on Friday. Tickets/more info:


Photo: Tom Hines

See SPOON and the Antlers at Madison Theater

Spoon is the most reliable band on the planet, each album a slight variation on frontman Britt Daniel’s long-running love of terse, sharp-edged Rock & Roll. The Austin, Texas outfit’s eighth album, 2014’s They Want My Soul, is more of the same, each song a deceptively simple mix of interlocking parts: insistent beats from essential drummer Jim Eno, angular guitar riffs, driving bass lines, a sprinkling of keyboards and other subtle additives and Daniel’s vocals, which are as up-front as ever. Spoon with The Antlers perform Saturday at Madison Theater. Tickets/more info:

Get really excited to taste all the wine at the URBAN WINE FESTIVAL

Wine isn’t for snobs. At least that’s the concept behind Over-the-Rhine’s first Urban Wine Festival, which is presented by 1215 Wine Bar & Coffee Lab and takes place in their adjacent parking lot. Whether your palate prefers red or rosé, all styles of vino will be represented via 24 selections from local distributors. In addition to a public tasting, the fest includes live music, food and a seminar featuring regional winemaking professionals. Noon-10 p.m. Saturday; tastings start at 2 p.m. $6 glass pours; $48 to taste all 24. 1215 Wine Bar & Coffee Lab, 1215 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine,

Celebrate sustainability, local music and good food and beer at SAYLER PARK SUSTAINS

In an effort to foster neighborhood engagement and educate residents in sustainable earth-first practices, Sayler Park Sustains features plenty of food trucks, local beer, vendors and raffles, along with music by The Tillers, Mamadrones and The Part-Time Gentlemen. Anticipate music demos with the Rabbit Hash String Band, as well as info on soil composting, how to green your home and DIY personal care products. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday. Free. Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 6600 Gracely Drive, Sayler Park,

Flogging Molly


If you want to work up a sweat to some high-energy music this summer concert season, your best bet is coming up this weekend as the Flogging Molly/Gogol Bordello tour steamrolls into town. Flogging Molly is known for its adrenalized twist on traditional Irish music, which is delivered with Mack truck-force, while Gogol Bordello calls its genre stew “Gypsy Punk” and pumps it out with equal aplomb and blood, sweat and tears. Adding even more red-hot spice to the concert mix is opening act Mariachi El Bronx, the popular, jet-fueled side project of Hardcore crew The Bronx, which uses (as the name suggests) Mariachi music as a jumping off point. 7 p.m. Saturday. $36-$48.50. PNC Pavilion, 6295 Kellogg Ave., California,

Relish in the history of America's pastime with a VINTAGE BASEBALL TOURNAMENT at Heritage Village

Take a time machine into America’s favorite pastime with the Vintage Base Ball Tournament, in which players face off in the diamond as if it were 1869, the year baseball’s first professional team — the Cincinnati Reds — formed. Whether you’re rooting for the Cincinnati Red Stockings or the Cincinnati Buckeyes, you can watch the ballists hit the horsehide in historically accurate uniforms as they follow older customs and speak in vintage discourse — strikers, hurlers, judges, scouts and all. Spectators are encouraged to dress up. Starts 10 a.m. Saturday. Free. Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road,

One Man, Two Guvnors
Photo: Cal Harris

Laugh your ass off at Cincy Shakes' ONE MAN, TWO GUVNORS

Ready to laugh your ass off? Cincinnati Shakespeare Company has everyone doing just that with this contemporary version of Carlo Goldoni’s 1743 comic masterpiece, The Servant of Two Masters. Richard Bean’s update is a riot of mistaken identities, love triangles and live music. The story of an ambitious guy who over-promises and gets stuck between rival bosses was a 2011 hit in London and a Tony Award winner in New York. James Corden played the fast-talking schemer in both towns — before he was named host of The Late Late Show on CBS. This will be perfectly silly summer fare. Through July 5. $14-$36. 719 Race St., Downtown, 513-381-2273,


Photo: Provided

Celebrate summer with a bowlful of tasty crustaceans at Washington Park's CLAMBAKE IN THE PARK

Get your grub on, Louisiana style. This beach-themed party in the park will not only be serving up steamy bowlfuls of seafood goodness from Washington Platform but also features games and live music from Cajun rockers Robin Lacy & DeZydeco. For only $12, you can dig into a dish full of clams, shrimp, mussels and potatoes, along with corn on the cob and a dinner roll on the side. Other options are available, like steamed Maine lobster and chicken with waffle fries. Laissez les bon temps rouler! Noon-6 p.m. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Photo: Dara Munnis

Head to Horseshoe Casino for HOZIER with DAWES

Every now and then a musician with immense talent reaches the upper echelon of the Billboard charts. They don’t get there because they’re so hot or because they’re dating Diplo. They didn’t win a talent competition. They’re just truly gifted, have worked hard and made it. That is the story of Hozier. The Irish singer/songwriter came out of nowhere last year when his song, “Take Me To Church,” bombarded airwaves and started collecting awards. And, yes, by now we’re all pretty sick of it. But it’s hard to deny there’s talent there. You can hear it in the lyricism and imagery, the simple piano, that backing choir and, holy fuck, that voice. Yes, you’re tired of “Amen.” But bite your tongue. Hozier is changing the Pop world, and he’s bringing that sound to Cincinnati. Show up, clap and bask in the sound of the Delta. Hozier with Dawes plays Sunday at The Shoe at the Horseshoe Casino. Tickets/more info:

Photo: Provided

Bring your furry friend to SECOND SUNDAY ON MAIN

Everyone’s favorite Over-the-Rhine block party returns. Every second Sunday, Main Street turns into a themed fiesta with a beer garden, kids area, tons of vendors, food trucks, live music, specials at OTR shops and restaurants and, this month, doggie-friendly activities. It’s the “Dog Days” of summer Sunday, with a contest, dog parade and more, including live chef demos at Mr. Pitiful’s, an appearance by Clifford the Big Red Dog, adoptable dogs from Save the Animals, Cincinnati Pit Crew and VITAS Paw-Pals, and a grand opening celebration for GOODS, a thematic retail store celebrating “adventure.” Noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Free. Main Street between 12th and Liberty, Over-the-Rhine,

Photo: Provided 

Remember Leelah Alcorn with a COSPLAY FOR LEELAH ALCORN

The Diverse City Youth Chorus, Cincinnati Pride and the Cincinnati Comic Expo are bringing a one-day-only cosplay celebration (where you dress up as your favorite anime, video game, cartoon, comic book, etc. character) to Over-the-Rhine. Leelah Alcorn created her own avatar, Lazer Princess, and this safe setting will let everyone express their authentic selves. The day includes cosplay skits, karaoke, a costume contest and parade down Main Street, plus a handful of vendors. Noon-5 p.m. Sunday. $8; $10 day-of. Woodward Theater, 1404 Main St., Over-the-Rhine,

Gorge on falafel at the MAHRAJAN LEBANESE FESTIVAL

The bounty of the Mediterranean comes to St. Anthony of Padua Church in Walnut Hills. Mahrajan features all sorts of Mediterranean eats, from fresh kibbee and hummus to grape leaves, falafel and baklava. Gorge yourself while belly dancers and Arabic bands take the stage, or watch a Middle Eastern Abaye fashion shows and modern Dabke folk dancing. Noon-8 p.m. Sunday. Free. St. Anthony of Padua Church, 2530 Victory Parkway, Walnut Hills,


Close out the weekend with stand-up from JOHNNY BEEHNER

“I’ve been told that after two or three years of marriage, a lot of couples decide to have babies,” comedian Johnny Beehner told an audience on The Late Show with David Letterman. “My wife and I discussed this and we decided we are not ready for a baby, not even close. Incidentally, we do have a baby. We’re not ready for it, but we do have one. It’s one of those little girl ones.” In addition to appearing on the now-retired Letterman’s program, Beehner is a frequent guest on the Bob & Tom radio program. Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery,

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (6/5-6/7)]]>
Theater, art, bugs to eat, opera to see, a performance from Ja Rule and a ton of music festival fun.

Dress for a fest and head to BUNBURY
This year’s Bunbury Music Festival, the first since it was acquired by Columbus, Ohio’s PromoWest Productions, features an ambitious and diverse lineup. The event, running Friday through Sunday at Sawyer Point and Yeatman’s Cove along the riverfront, will draw plenty of fans to see headliners like The Black Keys, The Avett Brothers and Snoop Dogg. But there are once again plenty of other reasons to explore the festival’s stages this year. Click here to read about our picks for some of the "must see" acts performing at the 2015 Bunbury Music Festival. Through Sunday. $79-$349. 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown,

Collective CAC
Photo: Jesse Fox 
Grab a cortado and check out some at the COLLECTIVE CAC
Helmed by Collective Espresso owners Dave Hart and Dustin Miller, Collective CAC opened in March. When you walk into the lobby, Collective CAC is to the left of the museum welcome desk. The dining area is comprised of two large angular, birch-colored communal tables and a few smaller round tables with white modernist wingback chairs. The current menu features all-day breakfast, with sandwiches, salads and snacks available until 2 p.m. daily. But if you have a hankering for a cortado in the evening, the café offers light bites and coffee service until close — which isn’t until 9 p.m. Wednesday through Friday. Current exhibits include The Perfect Kiss, The Vesper Project, Self-Portrait as Light and Remember the Future. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown,

Dog Show
Photo: Provided
Catch the final performances of CINCINNATI FRINGE
The Cincinnati Fringe Festival — running through June 6 — is celebrating 13 years of theater, creativity and fun. A total of 40 shows (selected by 24 jurors) will be presented during the 12 days of the 2015 Fringe, split almost exactly between shows generated by local creators and productions from elsewhere in the U.S., plus four international acts representing South Africa, Japan, Canada and the United Kingdom. Tickets for Cincinnati Fringe shows are $15 each; artists receive 50 percent of ticket and pass sales. Through June 6. Various venues in downtown and Over-the-Rhine. For a full schedule, visit

Ja Rule
Photo: Provided
Remember the early aughts with JA RULE
It’s been more than a decade since the early 2000s, which means we’re allowed to start feeling nostalgic about it. And what better way to indulge that nostalgia than with a Ja Rule concert. Signed to the infamous Murder Inc. record label (now called The Inc.), Ja Rule spent most of the late ’90s embroiled in a feud with Fiddy and Eminem and is probably most well known as a featured artist on hits from other early-aughts staples like J.Lo, Christina Milian and Ashanti — let’s be real, we all know all of the words to “Mesmerize.” He’ll perform at Fountain Square Saturday with openers Trademark Aaron, Diamond Star Russell and Mayo. 7 p.m. start; Ja Rule at 10 p.m. Free. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown,

Friends of the Public Library Used Book Sale
Photo: Provided
Get smart and buy some books at the FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY USED BOOK SALE
The Friends of the Public Library Main Library Book Sale returns Saturday for its 43rd annual event (through June 5), offering more than 50,000 used books from every category imaginable, with most prices between $1 and $4. Feel free to casually browse or go on a book-buying spree — there will most likely be something for everybody, whether you’re looking for Alice or Zhivago. Free. Main Library, 800 Vine St., Downtown,

Broadway Sing-Along with the Cincinnati Pops
Photo: Provided
Belt along with tunes from the Great White Way in BROADWAY SING-ALONG WITH THE CINCINNATI POPS
The Cincinnati Pops Orchestra begins its summer series with a special Broadway Sing-Along: Belt out your favorite Broadway hits by singing along to lyrics on the Riverbend Corbett Pavilion big screen with talented guest vocalists. Conductor John Morris Russell will lead the orchestra and audience in classics such as “Defying Gravity” from Wicked, “Dancing Queen” from Mamma Mia! and selections from Rocky Horror Picture Show. 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets start at $20. Riverbend, 6295 Kellogg Ave., California,

Germany Day Weekend
Photo: Provided
Bite a brat during GERMAN DAY WEEKEND
Get out your finest lederhosen and celebrate Cincinnati’s cultural roots with German Day Weekend, which provides an immersive environment for attendees to experience a heritage still thriving today. The celebration, which turns 120 this year and raises funds for the German Heritage Museum, kicks off on Saturday, when a parade at Findlay Market will showcase traditional German dance and music. On Sunday you can chill at the Hofbräuhaus Newport brewery for authentic German fare and craft beer. Guten Appetit! 10:30 a.m. Saturday. Free. Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine,

Incline District Street Fair
Photo: Provided
Explore Price Hill during the INCLINE DISTRICT STREET FAIR
Created to showcase the multicultural richness of Price Hill, the Incline District Street Fair strives to bring the surrounding community together at an event held the first Saturday of every month (through September). The fair, held across the street from Holy Family School, will feature local food, live entertainment, craft beer and a variety of artisan vendors. All proceeds benefit the mission and ministry of Holy Family. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. 3001 Price Ave., Price Hill,

I Love Lucy Live on Stage
Photo: Justin Namon
Laugh along with "I LOVE LUCY" LIVE ON STAGE
Back in the 1950s, Lucy and Ricky Ricardo were a big TV hit on I Love Lucy. To experience the fun — and what TV was like 60 years ago — you should head to the Aronoff Center, where you’ll get a taste of what had America laughing. I Love Lucy Live on Stage recreates the filming of two episodes of the pioneering sitcom starring zany comedienne Lucille Ball and her real-life husband, Cuban band leader Desi Arnaz. Between segments of the show there’s interaction with the studio audience — aka everyone in the theater — plus live singers doing ads from the era. Through June 14. $29-$102. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-621-2787,

Heteronormativity at the Ice Cream Factory
Photo: Jen Warren
See some art with HETERONORMATIVITY at the Ice Cream Factory
Working in monotype printmaking, collage and projection, Cincinnati-based artist Jen Warren will show a collection of artwork at artist/curator Paul Coors’ Brighton gallery, which focuses on her personal experiences living within a society in which queer women and other feminist voices are often silenced. According to the press release, because Warren lives within a society that continuously “others” her, creating art acts as a healing process for her. Opening reception: 7-11 p.m. Saturday. On view by appointment through June 19. Free. Ice Cream Factory, 2133 Central Ave., Brighton,

Photo: Jesse Fox
Find creepy crawlies at the Cincinnati Museum Center's BUGFEST
The 12th annual BugFest pays tribute to all things arthropod. There will be hands-on activities, environmental information, insects as food and a forensic entomology display. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Activities free in rotunda. Cincinnati Museum Center, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate,

The Producers
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
See a matinee of the first show at the Warsaw Federal Incline Theater THE PRODUCERS
Hit Broadway musical The Producers is the first show staged at Cincinnati Landmark Production’s new Warsaw Federal Incline Theater. It's the story of a pair of hucksters who raise a boatload of money to stage “the worst play ever written,” an extravagant musical they’re confident will fail (its title: Springtime for Hitler) enabling them to make off with the funds they’ve raised. Much to their surprise and dismay, it’s a wacky hit. Through June 21. 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Warsaw Federal Incline Theater, corner of West Eighth and Matson, East Price Hill, 513-241-6550,

Bring a lawn chair for OPERA IN THE PARK
The Cincinnati Opera goes live in Washington Park and kicks off their 95th anniversary with a free outdoor concert. Selections include opera and musical theater favorites performed by the stars of the 2015 season, the Cincinnati Opera Chorus and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. 7 p.m. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Emily and Justin Carabello
Photo: Jesse Fox
Grab some snacks at TASTE OF NEWPORT
Restaurants and food businesses from all over Northern Kentucky — 24 to be exact — will be swarming Monmouth Street, festival-style, eager to feed hungry people. Look for bites and drinks from the likes of Carabello Coffee, Dixie Chili, Green Derby, La Mexicana and more. Entertainment, including sidewalk sales, live music and family activities, will also be available, plus beer booths featuring domestic and craft beers of all sorts to wash down the food. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Food prices vary. Monmouth Street, Newport, Ky.,

48-Hour Film Project
Photo: Provided
Catch a screening of 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT films
Lights. Camera. Hurry. Five hundred professional and amateur filmmakers in the region recently competed in the 48-Hour Film Project, an event that requires participants to write, film and edit a five-minute movie in only two days. You can watch the local films premiere Sunday at a series of screenings at the Thompson House in Newport, the perfect way to catch a little Cincinnati cinema. Then on July 8, at a Best Of Screening at the 20th Century Theater, the project will award the “City Winner.” The winning film will be held in competition with other winners from around the world, with a panel of international judges deciding the ultimate prize: a showcasing of the top 10 films at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival in 2016. Screenings 3, 5 and 7 p.m. Sunday. $10. Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., Newport, Ky.,

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (5/15-5/17)]]>
Lots of things to do this weekend, from festivals and craft beer drinking to arts and film screenings. Plus, The City Flea, Carol Ann's Carousel and new OTR shop Idlewild open.

Head to Bogart's for INTERPOL
Interpol’s 2002 debut Turn on the Bright Lights seemed to arrive out of nowhere, a visceral, uncommonly mature effort that channeled not only a host of Post Punk staples but also a distinct post-9/11 desolation. It was, in fact, the product of the band’s founder, guitarist and driving force Daniel Kessler’s long-simmering vision, one he formed through years of writing and playing live around New York City with frontman Paul Banks, bassist Carlos Dengler and drummer Sam Fogarino, who was the last (essential ingredient) to join the band in 2000. Thirteen years after that stirring debut, Interpol is still kicking — minus Dengler, who left after recording the band’s self-titled fourth album in 2010; Banks now serves as the group’s bassist — and still delivering its melancholic, angular brand of Indie Rock. Interpol performs at Bogart's Friday. Tickets/more info here

Photo: Matthew Andrews Photography
Get your drink on at MAIFEST in MainStrasse
Based on the German tradition of welcoming the first spring wines, the 36th annual Maifest fills six city blocks of historic MainStrasse with food, beer and wine, and works by more than 75 artisans and craftsmen. There will also be entertainment by top local bands — 500 Miles to Memphis, Young Heirlooms, Ricky Nye and more — in the craft beer garden, with a special Kinderplatz area with rides for children and a Braxton Brewery light display at the Clock Tower Friday and Saturday night. Don’t miss the popular street chalk-drawing contest Saturday. 5-11:30 p.m. Friday; Noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday; Noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. MainStrasse, Sixth Street, Covington, Ky.,

The Breakfast Club
Photo: Universal Pictures
Break out the acid wash and pleated pants for a screening of THE BREAKFAST CLUB
Revisit your favorite brain, athlete, basket case, princess and criminal Friday when The Breakfast Club’s Brat Pack returns to the silver screen at the Esquire Theatre in honor of its 30th birthday. John Hughes’ high school bildungsroman might not be completely timeless, but it’s the movie’s cliché moments that make it so enduring. Forgo popcorn for Pixy Stix and don’t forget to bring your acid wash jeans and “Members Only” jackets — prizes will be given for the best ’80s costume. 10:30 p.m. Friday. $9.75. Esquire Theatre, 320 Ludlow Ave., Clifton,

CincItalia Festival
Binge on lasagna in a mini piazza the CINCITALIA FESTIVAL
The CincItalia festival celebrates all things Italy. You’ll find main dishes with lots of authentic Italian flavor like stromboli, lasagna, grilled spiedini and more, complete with a wide selection of wine and beer and cooking demonstrations. Visit the ladies of La Societa Fuscaldese Femminile to try their famous cannoli or enjoy lively music and a glass of vino in the mini piazza, with fountain and Tivoli lights. 6 p.m.-midnight Friday; 3 p.m.-midnight Saturday; 1-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. Harvest Home Park Fairgrounds, 3961 North Bend Road, Cheviot,

MadTree Brewing Company
Photo: Jillian Tellep
Have some beer on a paint palette at ARTS & CRAFTS
Organized by a handful of sophomore graphic design students at the University of Cincinnati’s DAAP (and with sponsorship from Modern Makers, a multidisciplinary arts collaborative), Arts & Crafts involves the consumption of local craft beer and the exhibition of up-and-coming artists — with accompanying food trucks and live music. With the expressed intent of supporting local breweries and artists in an effort to nurture the arts in the Clifton community, organizers enlisted UC students to participate as well as breweries MadTree, Rhinegeist and more. 7-9 p.m. Friday. Free. Niehoff Urban Studio, 2728 Vine St., Corryville,

Put in your pin curls for CINCY SWING FEST
Put in your pin curls and break out the saddle shoes for the second annual Cincy Swing Fest. Can’t Lindy Hop? No problem. Cincy LX/Swingallery will be on hand to provide complementary dance instruction to live music from Swing Band The Makeshifts. Classic cocktails available, plus pin-up makeovers from Retrocentric. 6-10 p.m. Friday. Free. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown,

Run the OTR 5K and then head to THE CITY FLEA for an after party
The ninth annual OTR 5k run/walk kicks off summer in the city a little early. The race begins and ends in Washington Park, with a course that takes you through historic Over-the-Rhine. Dogs and strollers welcome. Register online or in person. 10 a.m.; afterparty celebration until 4 p.m. Saturday. $30. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Curated monthly urban flea market The City Flea launches a new season Saturday at Washington Park. Keep your dollars local and support small business by shopping from hundreds of area vendors, selling everything from handmade goods and vintage finds to artisan eats and organic beauty products. Food trucks flank the park and drinks will be available from the concession stand. This month’s flea is also home to the OTR 5k afterparty. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Free. 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Ride for free at the CAROL ANN CAROUSEL opening celebration
The public is invited to a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Carol Ann's Carousel at Smale Park on the Riverfront. Following the ceremony, the carousel will open with free rides from 1-7 p.m. Tickets will be handed out on a first come, first serve basis. Other festivities include face painters, jugglers, magicians, food carts, music and more. Ride one of 44 adorable characters — horses, frogs, elephants and more. $2 a ride after Saturday. 11 a.m. Free. North of Mehring Way at the Pichler Fountains, Downtown,

Photo: Jay Blakesberg
PIXIES play the Horseshoe Casino
History will always chiefly remember Kurt Cobain as a creator of music, not a consumer. But the Nirvana leader was also an avid advocate for his favorite groups and most cherished influences. In the posthumously released Journals, he documented his 50 favorite records. Most telling of all was his inclusion of Pixies’ Surfer Rosa in spot No. 2. That’s significant because Nirvana’s biggest hit owes a great debt to the group. Since reuniting in 2004 to tour and occasionally record (last year’s Indie Cindy was Pixies’ first album since 1991’s Trompe le Monde), the band has evolved into more of an elder statesman outfit (minus original bassist/singer Kim Deal, replaced on the group’s current tour by Paz Lenchantin, who’s worked with acts like A Perfect Circle and Zwan), showing only rare glimpses of the brilliant provocateurs of their youth. But it’s not as if the band has much more to prove; its unimpeachable impact was cemented long ago. Pixies play The Shoe at Horseshoe Casino Saturday. Tickets/more info here.

Dress as a stormtrooper at the LIBRARY COMIC CON
Move over, San Diego. The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s third annual Comic Con proves you can immerse yourself in countless comic book universes locally. The five-hour festival has expanded to offer a host of events, including trivia, guest panels from local cartoonists, drawing contests and a superhero training camp for kids. Have a Wonder Woman ensemble, an Iron Man outfit or suit of armor for which you haven’t yet found a socially acceptable occasion? All ages can dress up as their favorite characters to win prizes. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Free. Main Library, 800 Vine St., Downtown,

Shop at IDLEWILD, Article's new women's boutique in OTR
Over-the-Rhine men's shop Article's sister store, Idlewild, opens Saturday. Brands sold at the store include Imogene and Willie, a Nashville, Tenn.-based denim company, and Free People. The shop will also feature garments from New York designers Steven Alan and Emerson Fry, as well as accessories from a pair of Portland, Ore.-based designers Another Feather and Mazama. 11 a.m. Free. 1232 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine,

Three Days of Rain
Photo: Untethered Theater Company
Get immersed in THREE DAYS OF RAIN at the Clifton Performance Theatre
Richard Greenberg’s Three Days of Rain is a mystery that unfolds in reverse. In Act I it’s 1995 as three adult children of two iconic New York City architects ponder the current state of their lives and what motivated their parents three decades earlier. Their conclusions, based on memory and a recently found laconic journal, make sense, but when Act II pushes back to 1960, almost everything they have hypothesized proves to be wrong. As is often the case, life was much more complicated. Continues through May 23. $25. Clifton Performance Theatre, 404 Ludlow Ave., Clifton,

Waite’s painting “Old School Boys Pool” is based on a swimming pool at the old School for Creative and Performing Arts. 
Check out paintings of abandoned sites in THE CINCINNATI SERIES
In his The Cincinnati Series of 29 paintings depicting depopulated city sites, Peter Waite — a Connecticut-based artist — neither celebrates nor dismisses what he sees. Rather, he just tells it like it is. His artwork is at Carl Solway Gallery in the West End through Aug. 1. If he finds something architecturally interesting to him that is also conventionally beautiful, like the suspension bridge or Union Terminal or downtown’s Isaac M. Wise Temple, he acknowledges and presents it. But if it’s something that interests him because it’s abandoned and decrepit, or it no longer serves its original use, he presents that, too. The Cincinnati Series continues at Carl Solway Gallery through Aug. 1. More info:

Price Hill Thrill
Photo: Steven Rosen
Tour the arts in Price Hill with PRICE HILL THRILL
Sunday there will be a tour of art studios and galleries in Price Hill, sponsored by the Weston Gallery. The event begins and ends at the Dunham Arts Center in the Dunham Recreation Complex and includes food, drink and entertainment by Comet Bluegrass All-Stars at a 5-7 p.m. closing reception. 2-7 p.m. Sunday. $35. 1945 Dunham Way, West Price Hill,

Tommy Davidson
Photo: Provided
Shaquille O’Neal’s All Star Comedy Jam is coming to town — get excited. Now lower the bar two notches because Shaq will not actually be there. … But raise the bar up again because comedian and actor DeRay Davis is hosting and he was on an episode of Empire. Other featured comedians include Tommy Davidson (pictured), Tony Roberts, Michael Blackson and Red Grant. Research some of their stuff on YouTube and check out the gig. The comedy franchise has featured some of the top urban comedians in the country and has been televised annually since 2009. 7:30 p.m. Sunday. $45.25-$92.25. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown,

Henry V
Photo: J. Sheldon Photo
Catch a matinee of a different Game of Thrones with HENRY V at Cincy Shakes
If you’re a fan of Game of Thrones, you might want to tune in to Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, which is working its way through the real thing presenting Shakespeare’s eight history plays in chronological order over the span of five years. Up next is Henry V, in which the profligate Prince Hal has succeeded his bellicose father and sobered up to the bad state of affairs in England. He rallies the troops and his loyal partisans by declaring war on France. Against great resistance, using powerful speeches he pulls the kingdom together. Justin McCombs continues in this fascinating role. Through May 30. $14-$36. 719 Race St., Downtown, 513-381-2273,

Quiet Company
Photo: Leah Muse
Austin, Texas' QUIET COMPANY play the Southgate House
With an instantly, insistently catchy Indie Pop/Rock sound that has drawn comparisons to the likes of Weezer and Death Cab for Cutie, Austin, Texas’ Quiet Company has seen its national profile rise considerably with the release of each new album, including this year’s excellent Transgressor. The group (which features former Cincinnatian and CityBeat employee Matt Parmenter on bass) is already a dominant force in its hometown scene. In its nearly decade-long history, Quiet Company has scored 12 Austin Music Awards, including Best Rock Band at the 2015 ceremony. But the acclaim isn’t limited to Austin — Time, Paste, The New York Times and numerous other national outlets have heaped praise on Quiet Company, and the group’s fanbase continues to grow thanks to regular touring and an explosive live show. 8 p.m. Sunday. $10; $12 day of. Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, Ky.,

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (4/17-4/19)]]>
See some world premiere theater at NKU's Y.E.S. FESTIVAL
Every two years Northern Kentucky University’s Department of Theatre and Dance offers audiences several theatrical adventures when it presents the world premieres of three plays. This year’s 17th biennial “Year End Series” productions are Joe Starzyk’s antic murder mystery and love story, It’s a Grand Night for Murder; David L. Williams’ The Divine Visitor, a tale of a ghostly Casanova inspired by British comedies from the 17th century; and Colin Speer Crowley’s Encore, Encore, a portrait of acerbic wisecracker and drama critic Dorothy Parker. Since 1983, NKU has undertaken this ambitious program, debuting more that 50 new works. Through April 26. $11-$14. Northern Kentucky University, Corbett Theatre/Rose Stauss Theatre, Fine Arts Center, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, Ky., 859-572-5464,

Check out an EP release for COCONUT MILK
Local Indie Pop/Rock quintet Coconut Milk hosts a free release party in honor of its second EP, We’re Sorry, Friday at Northside Tavern. The band will be joined by fellow Cincinnati band Founding Fathers, as well as Columbus, Ohio’s Fine Animal and Dayton, Ohio’s Forage. On its Facebook page, Coconut Milk describes its sound as “Beach Rock,” which is one of the more precise self-descriptions by a band you’ll ever see. Like the best oceanfront-linked music (going back to The Beach Boys, but think more “Warmth of the Sun” than “Surfin’ USA”), there is a compelling blend of airy contentment and wistful melancholy to Coconut Milk’s sound. If Belle and Sebastian and Nada Surf went on a writing retreat to some small beach town on the West Coast, they’d probably come up with something similar to what Coconut Milk lays down on We’re Sorry. Free. Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave., Northside,

Mark Normand
Mark Normand may become your favorite new comedian. “I was incredibly hungover today,” he tells an audience. “Had another beer. Hangover went away. Isn’t that the amazing thing about booze? The thing that causes the problem is also the solution. I wish other problems were like that. You have sex with a girl, she gets pregnant, have sex with her again, no more baby. Then you’re guaranteed to get laid at least twice.” The New Orleans native, now based in New York City, has appeared on Conan, Showtime’s Live at SXSW, Inside Amy Schumer, Last Comic Standing and the hit Chris Hardwick game show @Midnight. Showtimes Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery,

The Taming of the Shrew at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company
Photo: Mikki Schaffner Photography
Take a jolly romp through the TAMING OF THE SHREW
If you’ve ever seen The Taming of the Shrew, you might remember it as the tale of an ill-tempered woman brought into line by an abusive, gold-digging suitor. In that simple summary, Shakespeare’s early comedy understandably doesn’t sit well with most modern audiences. But contemporary presenters of the show have a variety options to make it more palatable. In its current staging at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, guest director Kevin Hammond has utilized more than one of them. Framed in this way, the story of the combative courtship feels more like a funny skit than a real recommendation for a happy marriage. In fact, Petruchio invites anyone in the audience who “knows better how to tame a shrew, now let him speak.” Nick Rose, a delight to watch in this rambunctious role, delivers the line straight to the audience and waits for a response. mond, the artistic director of Humber River Shakespeare in Toronto, uses 15 members of Cincinnati Shakespeare’s company to their full comedic potential. The Taming of the Shrew, presented by Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, continues through April 25. Read a review here.

Prep for Earth Day by checking out the recycled sculptures at ECOSCULPT
In celebration of Earth Day, recyclables meet innovation during this three-week installation. Produced by 3CDC, EcoSculpt gives artists a chance to design and display large-scale, eco-friendly sculptures using recycled and recyclable materials in Washington Park. Judges will choose first-, second- and third-prize winners based on concept, execution and construction. All art is displayed during park hours. Awards ceremony 5 p.m. April 22 (Earth Day). Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Belle Histoire 
Photo: Taylor Foiles
Belle Histoire's JANE DECKER celebrates an album release at Rohs Street
Cincinnati Indie Pop artist Jane Decker, who found some national acclaim with her former band Belle Histoire and with an appearance on the popular singing competition TV show The Voice, recently had her new single/video “Stonewallin’ ” premiered internationally on This Friday, Decker will be celebrating the release of her new three-track EP of the same name with a performance at Rohs Street Café. Decker joins local up-and-coming AltRock band Harbour for its first headlining show, which also features Columbus, Ohio’s Indigo Wild. The all-ages show starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8 in advance (through or $10 day of show. More information on Decker can be found at 245 W McMillan St., Clifton Heights,

Braxton Brewing Company
Get a couple brews on the BARON BREW BUS TOUR
American Legacy Tours’ Barons Brew Bus returns for your drinking pleasure. The four-hour tour visits five Greater Cincinnati breweries: Christian Moerlein, Braxton Brewing Company, Rhinegeist, Hofbrauhaus and the new Taft’s Ale House (which recently opened on Race Street). As the tour guide entertains you with tales of Cincinnati’s brewing history, you will retain less and less after tasting more than 14 different beers. The party starts at Taft’s, with a bottle of water and soft pretzel sticks. Noon Saturdays. $65. Taft’s Ale House, 1429 Race St., Over-The-Rhine,

Go green at the CINCINNATI EARTH DAY celebration
This annual Earth Day bash features a drum circle from the Miami Valley Council for Native Americans, a kid’s zones, live music, recycled costume contest, lecture series, parade with mascots, an animal showcase and more. Lecture topics include Red Bike, the streetcar and benefits of hemp. World Peace Yoga will be offering free yoga classes during the event at 1 and 3 p.m. Rain or shine. Noon-5 p.m. Free. Sawyer Point, 700 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown,

Asian Culture Fest
Photo: Provided
Buy some blossom-scented soap at the ASIAN CULTURE FEST
The Cincinnati Museum Center is whisking you abroad to the Far East, where you’ll explore the rich histories, arts, culture and traditions of China, India, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam and Nepal at Cincinnati’s one-day Asian Culture Fest. Peruse the Asian marketplace, where you can shop for authentic Asian-themed merchandise, including Japanese blossom-scented soaps and artisan glass bonsai trees. Cultural activities and performances include a Henna-adorned candle workshop, Taiwanese Lion Dance, Shadow Puppet Theater, traditional Japanese drum performances and much more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Activities in the Rotunda and surrounding areas are free. 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate,

Along with the many colors spring brings are the many new animal babies brought into the world and in need of a home. Around this time of year the Boone County Animal Shelter sees a sharp increase in animal intake, so they’re hosting a spring “baby shower” to raise donations for kitten and puppy food, potty pads, milk replacement and other items. Of course, there will also be a host of adorable adoptable kittens and puppies looking for a forever family during the shower. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Free. 5643 Idlewild Road, Burlington, Ky., 859-586-5285,

Everybody's Records
Photo: Eamon Queeney
Check out exclusives at RECORD STORE DAY
International Record Store Day is this Saturday and pretty much every independent record store in the area will be participating, offering RSD’s exclusive, limited-edition releases from hundreds of artists and other fun throughout the day. Many of those local stores will also be carrying a unique local exclusive, Bootleggers & Hustlers Volume One, a vinyl compilation album put together by Chris Breeden (manager of legendary local bar Arnold’s) and local graphic designer Keith Neltner of Neltner Small Batch ( Limited to just 300 signed and numbered copies, the album features tracks by local (mostly Roots/Americana) artists who have performed at Arnold’s over the years: Cincinnati Dancing Pigs, The Part-Time Gentlemen, Jake Speed and the Freddies, The Tillers, The Kentucky Struts, River City Roustabout, The Goodle Boys, Buffalo Wabs and the Price Hill Hustle and The Sundresses (St. Louis band ClusterPluck also contributes a track). So get out there Saturday and support both local independent businesses and local music. More info and venus here

Zoo Blooms
Photo: Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden
Enjoy some blooms at the CINCINNATI FLOWER SHOW
The Cincinnati Horticultural Society presents the 2015 Cincinnati Flower Show. See beautiful floral and garden displays created by the region’s most talented professional and amateur landscapers and designers. The show also includes lectures from the Cincinnati Zoo staff, dramatic table setting displays, container gardens, a marketplace, picnics in the park and more. Through Sunday. $20; special events ticketed separately. Yeatman’s Cove, Sawyer Point, 700 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown,

Orphan Black
Photo: BBC America
Watch the season premiere of ORPHAN BLACK
The phrase “best TV show you’re not watching” is overused, but Orphan Black is one of the few shows that’s definitely deserving of the title. The BBC America drama follows Sarah Manning, a British single mom living in Toronto. Shaken by witnessing the suicide of a woman who looks exactly like her, Sarah discovers she was conceived as an experiment and is actually one of many clones. The concept is undeniably intriguing — what would you do if you discovered there was another you (let alone several)? The sci-fi concept might draw you in, but it’s Tatiana Maslany’s performance as a dozen different clones that keeps audiences coming back for more. If you aren’t caught up for the new third season, IFC will run an Orphan Black marathon starting at midnight Friday night with all episodes airing up until the season three premiere Saturday. Clear some space in the DVR! Orphan Black Season Premiere, 9 p.m. Saturday, AMC/BBC America/IFC/Sundance/WE.

The Happy Maladies
Photo: Michael Wilson 
Local quartet the Happy Maladies will be performing a late-night set as part of the Constella Festival at Ivy Lounge (formerly Obscura). The band — which brings together violin, guitar, mandolin, double bass and vocals — will play two short sets, showcasing new works and original music. The first set at 9 p.m. will feature selections from their most recent project, Must Love Cats, an album of commissioned compositions from American composers. The second set will feature music from their unreleased full-length. 9 p.m. $15 at the door; includes one drink. 645 Walnut St., Downtown,

John Aulabaugh
Support NKY Hates Heroin at JOHN AULABAUGH's album release show
Alt Country/Roots Rock singer-songwriter John Aulabaugh is the dictionary definition of a musical late bloomer. Though he says he’d never written (let alone recorded) a song until he was 50, the Washington D.C.-based Aulabaugh released an incredibly accomplished debut album this year, Of Sins Present and Past, which sounds like the work of a veteran artist. Beautifully arranged and produced, Aulabaugh writes soulfully on his debut about the people he’s encountered in his life, with many songs dealing with the topic of substance abuse’s ravages. As such, Aulabaugh’s album release show in Covington this weekend will serve as a benefit for the treatment programs of Northern Kentucky’s Transitions, Inc. The NKY Hates Heroin organization is also an official sponsor. 9 p.m. Saturday. $10; $15 day of. Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky.,

Listen to the songs of women at HERE AND NOW with MUSE, Cincinnati Women's Choir
Rachel DeVore Fogarty, Gwyneth Walker, Sarah Hopkins and Elizabeth Alexander are acclaimed composers whose music you may have never heard. MUSE, Cincinnati’s Women’s Choir, provides an opportunity to do so Saturday with two concerts titled Here and Aware, featuring the music of female composers at Saint Francis Seraph Church in Over-the-Rhine. The concert’s opener puts it right out there with Dianne Reeves’ “Endangered Species,” a defiant chant about a woman’s place in the world, followed by “Let Us Now Hold Hands,” a piece MUSE commissioned in 1995 from Dr. Jennifer Stasack with a text by Cincinnati poet Pat Mora. Another powerful piece is Elizabeth Alexander’s “Reasons for the Perpetuation of Slavery,” a three-part meditation on human complicity in “the price of keeping the prices low.” MUSE presents Here and Aware at 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday at Saint Francis Seraph Church in Over-the-Rhine. Tickets:

Hang out with the INDIGO GIRLS and the CINCINNATI POPS
This one-night-only Cincinnati Pops concert features the Grammy-winning Folk duo, The Indigo Girls. The girls — Amy Ray and Emily Saliers — will be performing their chart toppers, like "Closer," "Galileo" and "Power of Two," backed by the Pops. 6 p.m. doors. $20-$85. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Asian small-clawed otter
Photo: Newport Aquarium
Canyon Falls at the Newport Aquarium is the new home of some unique species of otters and reptiles, including two Asian small-clawed otters, the smallest and most social otter species in the world. You’ll also find a yellow monitor lizard and colorful panther chameleons from Madagascar. Say hello to Thunder, a more than 100-year-old snapping turtle, and spend some time at the Turtle Corral. Additionally, aquarium staff will host interactive otter talks focusing on survival adaptations and how humans impact the environment of otters. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. $23 adults; $15 children; free for children under 2. Newport Aquarium, 1 Aquarium Way, Newport, Ky.,

Buy some vintage stuff at the BURLINGTON ANTIQUE MALL
The Midwest’s premier antiques and vintage collectibles-only show is back, with 200 vendors spread over the Boone County Fairgrounds offering vintage jewelry, memorabilia and Midcentury Modern, as well as some wonderfully awful kitsch. It’s so good the History Channel’s American Pickers chose the fair as the location to film their spinoff, Top Collectors. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. third Sundays. Through October. $3. 5819 Idlewild Road, Burlington, Ky.,

Oxford Kinetics Festival
Build machines at the OXFORD KINETICS FESTIVAL
This celebration of all things kinetic — that is, relating to energy in motion — takes over Millet Hall in Oxford, Ohio. The family-friendly event is themed "Flight of the Flyer." Build your own moving contraption and then race it in either a bike-based "scramble" course (open to 18 and younger and families) or an alley-cat race for adults on human-powered machines. The fest also includes live music, a film festival and more. Noon-5 p.m. Free. Millet Hall at Miami University, 500 E. Sycamore St., Oxford,

See more stuff to do here.
<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (4/3-4/5)]]>

The Lion King began as a popular Disney animated feature film in 1994, but back then no one imagined that it would become a worldwide blockbuster stage production. In fact, when it was being assembled for Broadway’s refurbished New Amsterdam Theatre, a lot of skeptics wondered what would become of a story about heroic and often cute anthropomorphic characters in the hands of Julie Taymor, a respected but avant-garde director. More than 15 million people have seen touring productions of the show in more than 70 North American cities. It has returned to Cincinnati’s Aronoff Center for a four-week stop (through April 26) presented by Disney Theatrical Productions and Broadway in Cincinnati. For 2015, The Lion King will have “only” 32 performances (four weeks is double the length of time that most tours are presented at the Aronoff), likely meaning total attendance for these three stops could top 350,000 people — more than the population of the city of Cincinnati! These are staggering numbers for a show about wild animals in Africa.
In truth, it’s a more universal parable told by people brilliantly outfitted as lions, elephants, giraffes, antelopes, hyenas and birds, as well as a comic meerkat and warthog. Taymor’s imaginative costumes and puppet designs invite audiences to see the performers within them in a way that adds drama to the story. The Lion King, presented by Broadway in Cincinnati, continues at the Aronoff Center through April 26. More info: Read more here.

Drawing its name from the Pantone color for the Cincinnati Reds, 199C is a celebration of Major League Baseball just in time to get you ready for the official Opening Day parade. Friday evening, Covington’s art gallery/graphic design firm BLDG will host an exhibition of the work of nearly 60 artists from around the country who were asked to celebrate their home team and love of the game. BLDG has also teamed up with Covington area businesses to provide visitors with activities (a whiffle ball tournament, late night derby, photo booth and live music) to welcome the coming of baseball season. 4-11 p.m. Free. 30 W. Pike St., Covington, Ky.,

Buzzer at the Playhouse in the Park
Photo: Sandy Underwood

What happens when a guy who grew up in an inner-city neighborhood returns as a successful attorney, back because it’s now the trendy place to live? That’s Jackson’s story: He’s upwardly mobile and black, moving in with Suzy, his white schoolteacher girlfriend. But she’s not so comfortable with their arrangement. Add to the mix Don, Jackson’s privileged boyhood white friend who’s had drug issues and now needs a place to crash. The apartment’s buzzer is a reminder that their world isn’t so simple. Tracey Scott Wilson’s new play isn’t set in Over-the-Rhine, but it could be. Through April 19. $30-$85. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888,


It’s hard to stand out in the crowded Blues/Roots Rock field but Dallas-based Somebody’s Darling is a stacked deck of secret weapons. The visceral ’70s-to-today guitar pyrotechnics of David Ponder, the massive keyboard groove of Michael Talley, the velvet jackhammer rhythm section of bassist Wade Cofer and drummer Nate Wedan, and the smoke-and-whiskey-cured vocals of Amber Farris combine to create a blistering Blues sound that is reassuringly familiar and yet fascinatingly singular. Although Farris, who also plays electric and acoustic guitars, generates plenty of fair comparisons to Bonnie Raitt, Susan Tedeschi and Heartless Bastards’ Erika Wennerstrom (and maybe even a little Natalie Merchant in a rare quiet moment), she and Somebody’s Darling may align closest to Grace Potter and the Nocturnals by virtue of the slinky dynamism and mesmerizing power they both effortlessly exhibit. Somebody’s Darling plays Southgate House Revival's Revival Room on Friday. Tickets/more info here.

Braxton Brewing Company
It has been decades since Covingtonians have whiffed fresh malt percolating from a neighborhood brewery, but from now on when they’re near the corner of Seventh and Pike streets, this will be the norm. The family-owned and -operated Braxton Brewing Company held its grand opening on March 27, and invited the community into the 11,000-square-foot space, which features a brewhouse and taproom. The founders behind the endeavor are brothers Jake and Evan Rouse, their dad, Greg, and brewmaster Richard Dubé (formerly of Christian Moerlein). In October, Braxton secured the title of the highest-funded brewery project ever on Kickstarter (654 backers pledged a total of $71,885), which enabled the team to finish construction, purchase a 20-barrel four-vessel brewhouse, a 40-barrel fermenter and hundreds of kegs. The taproom, the epicenter of the brewery, houses two leather couches, tables with charging stations for laptops, TVs displaying social media interactions, Golden Tee and Power Putt consoles, and Cincinnati Bell-partnered gigabit Internet. (Braxton is the first craft brewery in the nation to have gigabit Internet.) The 20-seat bar area features 20 tap handles of Braxton beers like Sparky, a hoppy wheat ale; Crank Shaft, an IPA; and Storm, a golden cream ale. 4-10 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday; noon-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. 27 W. Seventh St., Covington, Ky., braxtonbrewing.comRead more here.

Earl Sweatshirt
Photo: Brick Stowell
Hip Hop artist Earl Sweatshirt’s name first came to the public’s attention when the group he was associated with, Odd Future (a collective that’s grown a bratty reputation thanks to live shows and its ridiculous Adult Swim program, Loiter Squad), became much-buzzed about, not only for its shenanigans but also its progressive musical prowess. His debut came out in 2010 as a free download through Odd Future’s website when Earl was in his mid-teens, but he disappeared from the fold, reportedly sent off to a school for “at-risk” kids by his mother. By 2012, Earl was back making music and performing, leading up to his excellent new full-length released just last month, I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside, a dark but smart and powerful album, showing the kind of introspection and honesty that made Kendrick Lamar’s good kid, m.A.A.d city one of the more compelling albums of this generation of Hip Hop. 7 p.m. Friday. $23. Bogart’s, 2621 Vine St., Corryville,

Photo: Shervin Lainez
Born in Burlington, Vt., and headquartered in New York City, Rubblebucket is a perfect storm of Pop precision, Soul passion, Art Rock quirk and Ska bob-and-weave choreography. Even a cursory spin through the band’s third and best album, last summer’s brilliantly loopy Survival Sounds, reveals a talented group of musical changelings who can bounce off the satellites with the screwball quiver of The B-52s, howl with the focused lunacy of Fishbone and jerk with the rhythmic intensity of Talking Heads, while making it all seem like a peyote-fueled marionette carnival conceived and soundtracked by Dirty Projectors. Last year was really a breakout one for Rubblebucket; Survival Sounds was praised by The New York Times, Spin and Noisey, while NPR hailed the track “Carousel Ride” one of the year’s 50 best songs. Rubblebucket plays Woodward Theater this Saturday. Tickets/more info here.

As Cincinnati welcomes spring, the Krohn Conservatory welcomes the colorful and exotic butterflies of the Philippines. For 12 weeks, Krohn will transform into a majestic tribute to the Southeast Asian island country, capturing its stunning natural beauty and Filipino culture. The showroom will be a tropical paradise of free-flying butterflies soaring among waterfalls and bold volcanic murals. A rainforest under glass, the conservatory will be filled with more than 3,500 beautiful plant species, such as ornate orchids, brilliant bromeliads, delicate anthuriums and dramatic dracaenas, providing a backdrop close to home for the native butterflies to flutter. Through June 21. $7 adult; $4 children; free ages 4 and younger. 1501 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams,

Art by Doug Korfhagen 
On Saturday, the NEAR*BY curatorial collective hosts OBO: The Labor Show, a social-practice and art experiment in which selected artists and tradespersons contract with each other to exchange labor for mutually beneficial purposes. It is inspired by anarchist Josiah Warren, who practiced something similar at his Cincinnati Time Store, an experimental storefront open from 1827 to 1830, considered the first experiment in mutalism. Among those participating are Doug Korfhagen (printing/woodburning), Donna Rubin (yoga), Libby Singhoffer (kombucha brewing) and Loraine Wible (pataphysics). 6-8 p.m. Saturday. Free. 2159 Central Ave., Brighton,

International Pillow Fight Day
In honor of International Pillow Fight Day, people all over the world will be bursting the seams of their pillows in feather explosions. Locally, bring your friends and kids to Northside’s Jacob Hoffner Park for a friendly pillow fight, where pajamas and costumes are totally encouraged. Make sure to bring soft pillows, wait for the signal to begin, and prepare for lots of laughter during the friendliest epic pillow fight battle of your life. 3 p.m. Saturday. Free. 4104 Hamilton Ave., Northside,

Easter Egg Hunt at Washington Park
Photo: 3CDC
Following the success of last year’s fun-filled event, the quest for Easter eggs continues at Washington Park. This year, Graeter’s has upped the game by adding 2,500 more eggs into the mix for a whopping total of 7,500 hidden, candy-filled eggs. There will also be face painting, a petting zoo and photos with the Easter Bunny. For those after something a little more gourmet, Taste of Belgium will also be on site serving their signature waffles. BYOB (bring your own basket). 10 a.m.-noon Saturday. Free. 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Here comes Peter Cottontail, hoping down to Volpenhein Pavilion at Devou Park. With spring finally deciding to show its face, what better way to celebrate Easter with your youngsters than with an Easter egg hunt? Come down to Devou Park’s annual hunt and have the young ones explore for pieces of brightly colored, egg-shaped treasure. 1 p.m. Saturday. Free for ages 3 to 12. Devou Park, Covington, Ky., 859-292-2151.

Rod Paulette
Photo: Provided
Rod Paulette set out to be an actor and majored in theater at Columbia College in Chicago but found comedy more to his liking. After a stint in advertising, he chucked the corporate world for the stand-up stage. “I like California — I just don’t like Californians,” he tells an audience. “I find them to be a little arrogant. I was talking to this lady there, a white lady, and I told her I was from Ohio and she asks, ‘Did you grow up on a farm?’ Really? When’s the last time you saw a black guy on a farm? I mean without the chain on his foot keeping his ass there? If you ever see black guy on a farm, walk up to him, tap him on the shoulder and tell him he’s free to go.” Thursday-Saturday. $10-$15. Funny Bone on the Levee, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Photo: Krae Photography 
We’ll soon be getting an eyeful of brightly colored flowers instead of gloomy winter greys at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s annual floral exhibit, Zoo Blooms. Daffodils, hyacinths, flowering trees and one of the largest displays of tulips in the Midwest will take over the zoo grounds, with free after hours concerts every Thursday in April — Tunes & Blooms — featuring local musicians in the urban oasis. Through April. $18 adults; $12 children; $9 parking. 3400 Vine St., Avondale,

In celebration of Earth Day, recyclables meet innovation during this three-week installation. Produced by 3CDC, EcoSculpt gives artists a chance to design and display large-scale, eco-friendly sculptures using recycled and recyclable materials in Washington Park. Judges will choose first-, second- and third-prize winners based on concept, execution and construction. All art is displayed during park hours. Awards ceremony 5 p.m. April 22 (Earth Day). Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,

Findlay Market remains a Cincinnati institution as the state’s oldest continuously operated public market. Another old thing? Monday marks the market’s 96th annual Cincinnati Reds Opening Day Parade. The parade will include local businesses and organizations like Rozzi’s Famous Fireworks, the Cincinnati Fire Department and, of course, the Cincinnati Reds. This year also marks the 25th fifth anniversary of the World Series championship that featured one of the most dominant back-end bullpen groups of all time. “The Nasty Boys” — Norm Charlton, Rob Dibble and Randy Myers — are this year’s Grand Marshals. Noon Monday. Free. Departs from 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine,
<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (3/27-3/29)]]>

Music! Plays! Events with alcohol! Acrobats and Classical music! Gorilla suits!


Influential Indie Rock band Sebadoh began in 1986 as an outlet for Dinosaur Jr. bassist Lou Barlow, who showed a keen lo-fi, experimental sensibility early on but also proved himself to be a compelling songwriter. After leaving Dinosaur Jr., Sebadoh evolved into one of the best bands of the era, with Barlow’s emotionally honest and effective songs becoming the band’s centerpiece. After reuniting with Dinosaur Jr., Barlow reteamed with longtime co-conspirator Jason Loewenstein and drummer Bob D’Amico to make the first new Sebadoh album in 14 years, Defend Yourself, released in 2013 on the Joyful Noise label. Defend Yourself received mixed reviews, but it’s a great addition to the band’s impossibly strong discography. The band returns to Cincinnati Friday after sneaking into town to play a free show at MOTR Pub last year. 9 p.m. Friday. $12; $15 day of show. Woodward Theater, 1404 Main St., Over-the-Rhine,

Cirque Mechanics
Photo: Armand Thomas Photography


The Cincinnati Pops presents Cirque Mechanics, an innovative show featuring aerialists, trapeze artists and contortionists performing alongside orchestral favorites from composers like Tchaikovsky, Strauss, Copland, Ravel and more. In a press release, conductor John Morris Russell describes it as a mix between Cirque du Soleil and the steampunk scene, with a huge titanium infrastructure placed before the orchestra that serves as the canvas for the entertainment. Additional fire performers, jugglers and magicians will also be at the event. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $25-$99; $10 children. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine,


The theme of this art-meets-cocktail-party event is “Cherry Blossom Bash.” Check out the museum’s Japanese art collection with hourly docent-led tours, and enjoy live music from The Happy Maladies (6:30 p.m.) in the Great Hall. Sushi and drinks available for purchase. 5-9 p.m. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park,



In Rick Elice’s loopy script (based on Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson’s novel about Peter Pan’s backstory), wordplay abounds, sometimes blowing by faster than the typhoon that comes upon ships on the way to Rundoon with three orphan boys to be sold into slavery. But this ensemble cast can manage wind speed as they narrate and perform the hilarious show — sometimes individually, sometimes together — but even more so as they race through delirious reinvention of the fairytale. Everything is performed both obviously and imaginatively, from levitating (at the close end of a seesaw plank) to a storm at sea to flying (with just the suggestion of motion, no wires — no “real” taking flight). Amusing costumes, a star field of 200 incandescent light bulbs and buckets of stage magic make it possible. Peter and the Starcatcher continues through April 4. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams,

Photo: Roadside Attractions

FILM: ’71

Streets don’t get much meaner than those of Belfast back in 1971 as the British army all but occupied the territory, caught up in what amounted to terroristic street fights between Catholics and Protestants with few truly innocent bystanders in the middle. Everyone took sides, no matter how reluctantly. Gary Hook (Jack O’Connell), an anonymous soldier in the British army, trains hard but is no standout. Hook looks for all intents and purposes like a young Liam Neeson or a baby-faced soldier-boy of few words (think Clint Eastwood) who is simply waiting for the opportunity to prove himself in the theater of battle. And he certainly gets his chance when his unit, under the command of a rather green lieutenant (Sam Reid), receives orders to back up local police in a neighborhood search for weapons. Opens Friday. Read full review here


Over the Moon Vintage Market


Rustic vases, crocheted tops, paint-chipped mirror frames and more will flood the Over the Moon Vintage Market this weekend. Shop a variety of vendors as you peruse various booth displays for vintage and urban goods, including primitives, furniture, garden items, artisan jewelry and unique feminine and bohemian style clothing. 4-9 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. Free. Agner Hall at Lawrenceburg Fairgrounds, U.S. 50 and Hollywood Blvd., Lawrenceburg, Ind.,

Elliott Brood
Photo: Provided 


When a band’s sound gets tagged as “Death Country,” you know something special is afoot. And Canadian trio Elliott Brood lives up to its advance billing in every conceivable way. Utilizing guitar, banjo, ukulele, bass pedals, kazoo, harmonica, keyboards, percussion and a sampler in acoustic and electric contexts, Elliott Brood has reimagined rootsy Country, Bluegrass and Folk in a twangy and bracing manner that suggests Old 97’s and legitimately deserves the designation of Canadiana.The trio’s latest triumph is Work and Love, released late last year to rapturous reviews, many of which cited it as the trio’s best album to date. No need to plan a long trip to see Elliott Brood; the best of the Great White North is coming your way. Free. MOTR Pub, 1345 Main St., Over-the-Rhine,

Photo: Provided


POP-UP CINCY, a monthly pop-up organization founded by local artist and designer Catherine Richards, invites creative thinkers and makers to participate in the second Concept Camp at an unused storefront in Corryville. Participants will brainstorm with peers from various sectors about effective ways to take their ideas from concept to completion in this one-day event. The space will feature an “idea wall” to pin project outlines and receive feedback from participants, as well as the opportunity to connect with those whose skillsets might help accelerate your plan. Work session: 1-4:30 p.m. (sign-up required); celebration: 5-7 p.m. Free. 3501 Burnet Ave., Corryville,

How to Build a Rain Barrel
Photo: The Civic Garden Center


Spring is slowly showing itself as the winter and its accursed snow melt away. As you plan to plant petunias, sunflowers, vegetables and more, consider the task of watering and the best practices to save money, go green and store water for a hot summer so your plants (and your wallet) won’t suffer. The Civic Garden Center hosts a DIY class on how to build and use your own rain barrel to collect free rain water to use for the garden. 1:30-3 p.m. Saturday. $10; free for Civic Garden Center volunteers. 2715 Reading Road, Avondale,

D.C. Benny
Photo: Provided


Like his peers Jimmy Shubert and Rocky LaPorte, D.C. Benny is a talented veteran comic who received a nice boost by competing on last season’s Last Comic Standing. Well-known in the New York and L.A. comedy scenes, Benny has also written and performed extensively for various TV projects. He also functions as the producer and head writer for Jim Breuer Unleashed on Sirius/XM satellite radio. On stage he mixes jokes with storytelling, peppering them with several original characters. Showtimes Thursday-Sunday. $15-$17. Funny Bone on the Levee, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Detroit '67
Photo: Mikki Schaffner


Detroit ’67, making its regional premiere at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati this month, is not something to smile about — but it might be possible to feel good about the “tryin’,” even though 48 years later the backdrop of this story feels eerily familiar, perhaps leading us to ask if America will ever rise above such racially driven conflicts. The details behind the story of Chelle (Zina Camblin) and Lank (Bryant Bentley), a sister and brother hoping to build a secure future, are this: In late July 1967, more than 10,000 citizens of Detroit rioted. Police had raided a blind pig — an unauthorized after-hours hangout very much like the one Chelle and Lank have established in their family’s basement — where more than 80 patrons, all African-American, had gathered to celebrate the return of a Vietnam veteran. Detroit '67 continues through April 5. $18-$44. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine,


Ian Svenonius in Moon Dust


Detroit-based painter Scott Reeder’s new Moon Dust is a sci-fi feature film with a one-and-a-half-hour running time. Moon Dust is about the denizens of a run-down tourist resort on the moon (called Moon World) who struggle to maintain enthusiasm at a time when the hip, wealthier travelers have all gone to Mars. With its deadpan tone, frequently improvised dialogue from non-professional actors (including Reeder, himself) and eccentric production design featuring color-saturated, patterned or monochromatic sets and oddball costumes and hairstyles, it very much is the work of a visual artist.  2 p.m. Sunday. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum’s Mary R. Schiff Library & Archives, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams,

The Cincinnati Gorilla Run
Photo: Provided 


This Sunday don’t be surprised to find downtown resembling a scene from Planet of the Apes. Hundreds of runners dressed as our endangered primate relatives will be participating in the Cincinnati Gorilla Run 5K presented by The Gorilla Glue Company, which aims to raise money for the Mountain Gorilla Conservation Fund. Gorillas found in the African mountains are close to extinction, and the Mountain Gorilla Conservation Fund is working to expand the program’s wildlife health and research center in Uganda. Registration closes at 5 p.m. March 28. Race opens at 9 a.m.; run starts at 11 a.m. $99.95 first-time gorillas; $40 and up for returning gorillas; $15 kid gorillas. Montgomery Inn Boathouse, 925 Riverside Drive, East End,

Mummies of the World
Photo: Cincinnati Museum Center 


The Cincinnati Museum Center’s new once-in-a-lifetime exhibit, featuring real mummies and artifacts, some dating back as far as 4,500 years, is in its final weeks. Discover how mummies are created, where they come from and who they are in an immersive, multi-media display. Through April 26. Non-member exhibition-only tickets: $19.50, $17.50 senior, $12.50 child. Cincinnati Museum Center, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate,

See more stuff to do here.

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (2/27-3/1)]]> After fans were teased by its brief availability online two weeks ago — a “bug,” they say — the next chapter of House of Cards is finally here. Since some of us are guilty of binge-watching both previous seasons, it’s been more than a year since many viewers have spent some quality time with the Underwoods. Let’s recap. 

On the brink of his impeachment, President Walker resigned at the end of Season Two. Walker’s wealthy confidant Raymond Tusk was arrested, knocking out two of Vice President Frank Underwood’s political roadblocks. After two seasons of watching Frank go to any length to secure his power, it seems he’s reached the pinnacle. Which means … 

Frank Underwood is the President of the United States of America. Terrifying. But that doesn’t solidify his reelection in the upcoming race. Wife and sometimes literal partner in crime Claire Underwood made some low and dirty moves last season. Despite Claire helping them both rise in the ranks, expect to see her question the couple’s actions and use her title as FLOTUS as she sees fit. 

And Doug Stamper was last seen lying in the woods. While trying to protect Rachel he sufficiently spooked her, leading to a chase and brick to the head. Fingers crossed for his (unlikely) miraculous return. 

If you do want to leave the house (or you finish the entire season before tomorrow night), here are some other things to do this weekend: 

Elton John
Music: Elton John 
The legendary Sir Elton John will be at U.S. Bank Arena on Friday with his piano and backing band, performing hits from his prolific five-decade career. His 2013 release, The Diving Board, was his 31st album, and Goodbye Yellow Brick Road — the album with “Bennie and the Jets,” “Candle in the Wind” and “Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting” — just celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2014. Warning: This show will probably sell out; he’s kind of a big deal. 8 p.m. Friday. $39-$149. U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway, Downtown,

The Total Look
Photo: William Claxton
Event: Art After Dark 
The Cincinnati Art Museum’s Art After Dark events are a great way to visit the museum after hours for socializing, art viewing and wine drinking. Friday’s Art After Dark event celebrates the opening of the museum’s new exhibit, The Total Look, an exploration of the creative collaboration between fashion designer Rudi Gernreich, model Peggy Moffitt and photographer William Claxton, featuring Mod garments Gernreich created in the 1960s and ’70s. Dress in your best ’60s-era ensemble for an evening of docent-led tours, dance performances by Pones Inc., appetizers and drinks. 5-9 p.m. Friday. Free. 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, 

Art: Final Friday/Reconstructed at 1305 Gallery 
Via the continued efforts of artist friends Michael Stillion and Melanie Derrick, 1305 Gallery continues to promote the work of quality artists more than a year after founder Lily Mulberry’s death. Final Friday, 1305 hosts Reconstructed: New Work by Michael Willett, a solo show of work by Willett, who graduated from DAAP’s MFA program and currently serves as an assistant professor of art at the University of Montevallo in Birmingham, Ala. His large-scale paintings and collages will be featured in an upcoming issue of New American Paintings, so check out his work while you can still see it for free. Through March 21. Free. 1305 Main St., Over-the-Rhine,

Photo: Shen Yun Performing Arts
Onstage: Shen Yun 
Prepare to be uplifted and inspired by tremendous onstage energy as legends and classic heroes spring to life through historic Chinese dance. Sensational global performing group Shen Yun will take you on a profound journey through 5,000 years of Chinese culture, featuring the world’s most classically trained dancers accompanied by a live orchestra combining the best of Chinese and Western composition. Anticipate leaps and flips of Shen Yun’s aerial masters, thundering battle drums and singers’ soaring voices with dazzling animated backdrops that transport you to another world. 7:30 p.m. Friday; 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday. $53-$123. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, 

Event: Cold Night & Warm Spirits 
If you’re tired of the winter dredge, seek refuge at Ault Park’s Cold Night & Warm Spirits whiskey tasting. Enjoy some of the finest American, Irish, Canadian and Scottish whiskies at this social and spirited event, with live music and light bites. Bring your own cigar to enjoy around a roaring fire on the cigar patio. Benefits Ault Park. 6:30-10 p.m. Friday. $40. 3600 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park,  

Marlee Matlin
Film: ReelAbilities Film Festival 
The ReelAbilities Film Festival, dedicated to movies that highlight the abilities of those considered “disabled,” isn’t new. It was here in 2013. But it’s vastly different this year — in fact, it’s now the city’s highest-profile film festival because the local group Living Arrangements for the Developmentally Disabled has contracted to operate the national series of ReelAbilities festivals and wants to make the Cincinnati fest, which runs from Friday to March 7, a showcase. There will be more than 15 features from around the world. Highlights include guests like Academy Award-winning actress Marlee Matlin at Friday afternoon’s awards luncheon; a touching film on Tuesday, The Commute, about a wheelchair-using man’s journey through the New York subway system; the Independent Spirit Award-nominated Stand Clear of the Closing Doors on March 7; and a documentary about the polio-afflicted great Rock & Roll songwriter Doc Pomus (“This Magic Moment”), which is being coupled with a tribute concert to him following the screening on March 6. Premiere Night Gala 6 p.m. Saturday. $150. More info at 

Music: Chris Brown 
Yeah. He'll be at US Bank Arena with Trey Songz. So if you like Chris Brown, this is great for you. His tickets also cost more than going to see Elton John? 7:30 p.m. Saturday. $29.75-$199.50. U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway, Downtown,

Maple Sugar Days
Photo: Great Parks
Event: Maple Sugar Days 
Come celebrate the spring awakening of maple trees as you learn the craft of maple syrup making. Sweet tooths of all ages will discover how the clear, sticky sap is collected, boiled over a fire and transformed into syrup. Additionally, families can enjoy crafts, demonstrations and naturalist-led hikes. Maple treats, including waffles, ice cream and cotton candy, will be available for a small fee. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Free. Farbach-Werner Nature Preserve, 3455 Poole Road, Colerain,

Cincinnati Home & Garden Show
Event: Cincinnati Home & Garden Show 
According to the current weather forecast, most of our yards will still be covered in snow during the entirety of the 2015 Cincinnati Home & Garden Show. As depressing as that may seem right now, spring is (hopefully) just around the corner and it has already sprung at the Duke Energy Convention Center. Wander through fairy gardens, let your significant other try to coerce you into buying a hot tub or swoon over kitchens the size of your entire OTR apartment. Seriously. Your only other plans this week are working and shoveling the walk … again. Opens 10:30 a.m. Saturday. Through March 8. $13; free for kids. 525 Elm St., Downtown,

Xoe Wise
Photo: Provided
Music: Xoe Wise 
Singer/songwriter Xoe Wise moved from North Carolina to Chicago to follow her musical dreams and quickly became a local favorite. Wise has gradually moved from a Folk Pop style to a highly melodic and soulful Electro Pop/Chillwave approach since debuting with her 2010 album, Echo. Wise’s excellent 2013 EP Breakfast was well received, reaching the Top 20 on iTunes’ Singer/Songwriter charts and beautifully showcasing Wise’s sultry vocals and songwriting. This spring, Wise — who performed at the 2014 MidPoint Music Festival — will release Foreplay, an EP precursor to her anticipated full-length, Racecar Orgasm. 10 p.m. Saturday. Free. MOTR Pub, 1345 Main St., Over-the-Rhine,

Attractions: Mummies of the World 
The Cincinnati Museum Center’s once-in-a-lifetime exhibit features real mummies and artifacts, some dating back as far as 4,500 years. Discover how mummies are created, where they come from and who they are in an immersive, multi-media display. Through April 26. Non-member exhibition-only tickets: $19.50, $17.50 senior, $12.50 child. Cincinnati Museum Center, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate,

Attractions: Bravo the Galapagos Tortoise's Last Day at Newport Aquarium 
The Newport Aquarium’s 650-pound Galapagos tortoise Bravo — the largest turtle in the Midwest — is set to leave his Turtle Canyon home on March 1 and return to the Columbia, S.C., zoo. Upon Bravo’s departure from the aquarium, Turtle Canyon, also home to Thunder, an more than 100-year-old snapping turtle, will temporarily close for renovations. The greenhouse-like facility will re-open as a new exhibit in mid-March. During Winter Family Days, two kids get in free with each paying adult. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. Through March 1. $23 adult; $15 kids. Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky.,

Event: Ohio Winter Food Festival 
Formerly known at the Taste of Northern Cincinnati, the Ohio Winter Food Festival celebrates the restaurants of Cincinnati’s northern suburbs. This friendly competition pits vendors like West Chester’s Troy’s Café, Parkers Blue Ash Tavern, Sharonville’s Brick House Bar & Grill and more against each other to win best in show. Taste each of the restaurants’ signature dishes and vote for your favorite. Noon-4 p.m. Sunday. $18; $20 at the door. Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Sharonville,

August: Osage County at Clifton Performance Theatre
Photo: Jennifer Mahuet
Onstage: August: Osage County 
Tracy Letts’ 2008 play was a throwback to another era, a three-act, three-hour drama about a dysfunctional family colliding in the arid flatlands of the Oklahoma plains when their father goes missing. Not the usual fodder of contemporary drama (or perhaps because of it), the show won that year’s Pulitzer Prize for drama and Broadway’s Tony Award for best play. It features 13 vivid and vicious characters and a houseful of contentious, sometimes startling interactions. It’s going to be all the more interesting when this sprawling script is staged in the close confines of Clifton Performance Theatre, which has about 40 seats for this production. Through March 14. $20. Clifton Players, 404 Ludlow Ave., Clifton,

Attractions: Falling Waters at Krohn Conservatory 
The Krohn Conservatory’s early spring floral show takes design inspiration from architect Frank Lloyd Wright (his 1935 modernist Pennsylvania home built for the Kaufmann family is called “Fallingwater”). The show features a Mission-style flowerbed that looks like a stained glass window made of hundreds of pansies, tulips and hydrangeas, as well as real stained glass windows created by local artist David Duff of Classical Glass. Through March 22. $4 adult; $2 child; $1-off coupon online. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams,

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
Photo: Andrew Eccles
Dance: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater 
Alvin Ailey once said, “Dance is for everybody. I believe that the dance came from the people and that it should always be delivered back to the people.” More than two decades after his passing, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is coming to the Aronoff for two days to deliver said gift of dance to Cincinnati. Among the six dances the troupe will perform over these two shows is Ailey’s most renowned and moving work, Revelations. Set to a series of African-American spirituals, Revelations explores both painful and splendid moments during the African-American journey. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. $30-$75. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown,
<![CDATA[Valentine's Day: Things to Do for Love]]>

Whether you’re a full-blown romance-seeker or single and proud of it, here's a list of Valentine’s Day tastings, dinner deals and events that will have you embracing the holiday no matter who you’re bringing. From soothing dinners to musicals to wild celebrations, take your pick from a range of fun atmospheres each wrapped up in its own festive charm with plenty to go around. 

BB Riverboats Valentine's Cruise — A romantic cruise with buffet dinner and live music. 7-9:30 p.m. Feb. 13 and Feb. 14. $48 adults. 101 Riverboat Row, Newport, Ky.,

Bistro Grace — Valentine's surf-and-turf special all weekend, with herb-buttered steak and pan-seared scallops. Dinner service starts at 4 p.m. $29.95 per person. 4034 Hamilton Ave., Northside,

Boca — The Boca Restaurant Group (Boca, Nada, Sotto) is teaming up with collaborative art group Chase Public for a unique take on date night. From 6-10 p.m., the alley between Boca (114 E. Sixth St.) and Nada will turn into a heated poetry lounge. Wander in to chat with Chase poets about your love story and receive a customized poem. 

Jimmy G's — Guests receive a complimentary glass of champagne with purchase of entree, and couples receive a complimentary dessert to share with a purchase of two entrees. 5-11 p.m. Feb. 14. 435 Elm St., Downtown,

La Petite France — Surprise that special someone with an elegant three-course gourmet meal featuring a range of appetizers, entrees and desserts to choose from. From grilled filet mignon with a brandy morel sauce to Grand Marnier crème brulee, your taste buds will be sure to feel some love, too. An extensive wine list and full bar is available. Reservations recommended. 5 p.m. Feb 14. $59.95. 3177 Glendale Milford Road, Evendale,

The Mercer OTR — A multi-course meal. Mains include wild mushroom risotto, scallops, beef tenderloin, berkshire pork chop and halibut. Chocolate and strawberries for dessert. 4 p.m. Feb. 14. 1324 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, 

Metropole — A four course farm-to-fireplace menu, with multiple choices. Mains includes seared scallops, verlasso salmon, grilled mushroom spaccatelli and more. 5:30-11 p.m. Feb. 14. $56-$73. 609 Walnut St., Downtown,

Nectar — A special three-course menu. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Feb. 14. $65 per person. 1000 Delta Ave., Mount Lookout,

The Palace — A five-course tasting with beet gazpacho, arugula and prosciutto salad, butternut squash and ousemade ricotta agnolotti, petit filet mignon and triple chocolate panna cotta. 5:30 p.m. Feb. 13 and Feb. 14. $85 Feb. 13; $95 Feb. 14. 601 Vine St., Downtown,

Salazar — A special menu featuring a lightly smoked oyster appetizer, Belgian endive salad, saffron risotto, seared sea scallops, pine-roasted New york strip and dark chocolate cake with pink peppercorn panna cotta and rosé foam. Reservations at 513-621-7000. Dinner service begins at 5:30 p.m. Feb.14. $90 per person. 1401 Republic St., Over-the-Rhine,

Steinhaus — A four-course dinner for two with live harp music accompaniment. A flute of bubbly champagne will be provided so that you may toast to your sweetheart. 4:30-10 p.m. Feb. 14. $60 per couple. 6415 Dixie Highway, Florence Ky.,

Symphony Hotel and Restaurant — Enjoy a five-course meal paired with a wine. 6-9 p.m. Feb. 14. $75. 210 West 14th St., Downtown,

Taft Museum of Art — Six wines paired with hors d'oeuvres and a self-guided tour of themes of love and romance in the Taft's permanent collection. 5-8 p.m. Feb. 14. $45; $35 members. 316 Pike St., Downtown,

Piccola Wine Room Valentine’s Day Pop-Up Dinner — Enjoy this three-course meal while listening to music by Jerome Cali in this charming little wine shop specializing in wines, unique cocktails and organic brews. Wine pairings will be available with dinner. Seatings at 6 and 8:30 p.m. Feb. 14. 23 Village Square, Glendale,

Washington Platform Saloon & Restaurant — One dozen fresh-shucked oysters, two entree choices, soup or salad, chocolate-covered strawberries and a bottle of wine to share. Plus a half-hour horse-drawn carriage ride. Faux Frenchman play Feb. 13 and Andrea Cefalo Feb. 14. Available Feb. 12-15. $115 per couple; $85 dinner alone. 1000 Elm St., Downtown,

A Heart-y, Art-y, Valentine Party — Surprise the kids with games, decorative face painting, and make-your-own Valentine cards with candy. 3-4 p.m. Feb. 14. Free. Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Corryville Branch, 2802 Vine St., Corryville,

Alice (In Wonderland)
Photo: Peter Mueller
Alice in Wonderland — Cincinnati Ballet presents the return of the wildly popular ALICE (in Wonderland) this Valentine’s Day weekend. Audiences have five opportunities to see this bold, spectacular take on Lewis Carroll’s classic stories with live instrumentation by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. 8 p.m. Feb. 13; 2 and 8 p.m. Feb. 14; 1 and 5:30 p.m. Feb. 15. $32. Aronoff Center for the Arts, 650 Walnut St., Downtown,

Cinderella: The Musical — Clifton Performance Theatre’s full-child cast production has young actors playing all the roles of this fairy tale classic. Explore the meaning of friendship, love, and humor in this not-so-girly adaption of Cinderella. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 13; 2:30 p.m. Feb. 14. $10 for adults; $2 for children. Clifton Cultural Arts Center, 3711 Clifton Avenue, Clifton,

Cin City Burlesque: Beaus and Eros — Join your favorite sweetheart, or round up your single friends. Either way, it’s bound to be a splendid time. Watch two shows in one night with new opening and closing numbers, some “cin”fully sweet new solo and duet acts and lots of audience participation with master of ceremonies Sweett Biscut. Seating will be tables of 2-4 for this intimate show. Tickets can be purchased at Sells out quickly. 6 and 9 p.m. Feb. 14. $19-$44. Bogart’s, 2621 Vine St., Corryville,

Daddy Daughter Dance — Girls spend a magical evening with their dads or the special guy in their life. Take your special date out to eat, and then come to the dance later for desserts and snacks. A free, professional photo will be provided at the dance to each girl registered. Additional photo packages will be available for purchase. This event is first come, first served. Space is limited. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 13; 2:30-4:30 p.m. Feb. 14; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 14. $40; $30 for residents per couple; $10 each additional daughter. Student Union Ballroom at Northern Kentucky University, 100 Nunn Dr., Highland Heights Ky.,

Fern + Una Floral Pop-Up — Una Floral and Fern have teamed up for Valentine'ss Day, and whether you're celebrating a partner or just self-love, they've got you covered with specialty gift boxes containing items from Herbivore Botanicals, PF Candle Co., Brown Bear Bakery, and a mini floral arrangement from Una Floral. They'll also be serving a "Heart-Beet" cocktail, made using Off the Vine Rockin' Roots juice as the focus, complemented by a lemon/ginger simple syrup, Lillet Rosé, Watershed Gin and topped with Prosecco. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Feb. 14. Fern Studio, 6040 Hamilton Ave., North College Hill,

From JB, with Love — Dedicated to art and the diversity of all individuals, Justified Bliss (JB) allows people to use their voice for expressive connection with others through open mic events. Just in time for Valentine's Day, this love show invites singles, couples, swingers, wives, anti-Valentine's day folks and romance seekers alike to take the stage. The event will feature gifted vocalist Bianca Graham, live musicians, dancers, poets and DJ Hershe B. 8-11 p.m. Feb. 13. $5. The Greenwich, 2442 Gilbert Ave., Walnut Hills,

In the Mood for Love
In the Mood for Love Screening — For anyone who has fallen in love with a friend, said goodbye to someone they care for deeply, or experienced the sacrifice and suffering that comes with the risk of loving, filmmaker Wong Kar-wai's masterpiece, In the Mood for Love, will move you deeply. The film conveys the moral dilemmas of the 1960s, depicting a passionate theme wrapped up between one couple. Tickets are available at 6 p.m. Feb. 13; 6 p.m. Feb. 14. $10-$50. Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington, Ky.,

Krohn by Candelight — Enjoy a romantic evening at this event as you make a special craft for your significant other and learn about chocolate in the education room. 5-7:30 p.m. Feb. 13. Free with admission ($2-$4). Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park,

Krohn Zone Explores Chocolate — Interested in more chocolaty bliss to learn how to make drizzles upon drizzles of tasty treats? Maverick Chocolate Company demonstrates chocolate making techniques. Better yet, a tasting is included. 1-2 p.m. Feb. 15. Free with admission ($4). Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park,

Linger Flower Pop-Up
Photo: Life in Balance Photography
Linger Flowers/Cheapside Cafe Valentines Pop-Up — What would Valentine’s Day be without dozens upon dozens of fresh flowers? Choose your favorites from hand-tied bouquets, single-stem garden roses, orchids, sweet peas, ranunculus, tulips and more. Interested in the language of flowers? You'll have the chance to read about the romance concealed within each bloom and choose a sweet message to share with your special someone. Beautiful handmade cards will also be available for purchase. 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Feb.14. $4-$50. Cheapside Café, 326 E. Eigth St.,

Love, Vodka. Death — As Valentine's Day falls right after Friday the 13th, embrace the spirit of love, lust, madness and death for these back-to-back days at the Masonic Center's Commandery Asylum. Romantic movies will bleed into horror classics as they're projected on the asylum walls, and 15 different vodka brands will be offered alongside delectable bites from A Catered Affair. Vodka tastings by Grey Goose, Titos, Stoli, Svedka, Three Olives, Hangar One, Crystal Head, Seagrams, Epic, Reyka, Blue Ice, Buckeye, Wildcat, Finlandia, & OYO. Entertainment is by Old Green Eyes, and a portion of the proceeds will go to the Cincinnati Exchange Project. Must be 21 or older. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 13. $60 for three; $45 for two; $25 for one. Commandery Asylum, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown,

My Furry Valentine
Photo: My Furry Valentine
My Furry Valentine — Rescue some adoptable animals who are in need of your love this Valentine’s Day. This nonprofit organization features more than 500 adoptable pets (dogs, cats, puppies, kittens and other small critters) from more than 40 different rescue and shelter groups from around the Greater Cincinnati area. Every pet adopted will go home with a free goody bag overflowing with pet supplies and will be entered to win one of our popular Adopter Raffle Baskets. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 14; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 15. Free. Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Sharonville,

Single Mingle — Mix and mingle with other singles in Jimmy G’s Sub T Bar & Lounge with drink specials and music by DJ. 5-11 p.m. Feb. 13. Free. Jimmy G’s, 435 Elm St., Downtown,

Single Awareness Party — Tired of couples getting all the attention on Valentine's Day? Come out to the first annual Singles Awareness Party where the single life is surely celebrated. Enjoy music by Brittany Gillstrap, My Brother's Keeper, Dan Crowe, Justin Duenne and Alex Evans. Pizza and deserts included. Tickets are available for purchase at 6-9 p.m. Feb. 14. $10 at the door. 7560 Burlington Pike, Florence Ky.,

St. Clair Traffic Light Party — Don’t worry about telling anyone what’s up with your love life. Instead, let them see for themselves. Wear green if you’re single, yellow if it’s complicated and red if you’re taken to let everyone in the room know your romantic status. 8 p.m. Feb. 14. The St. Clair, 245 Calhoun St., Clifton,

Valentine Valley: Crafts with Art Spark — Bring the kids out for some fun Valentine’s Day fun with Art Spark Studio, an art enrichment program dedicated to helping children express their creativity through art making. Anticipate a variety of crafts, including Valentines, crowns and more. For ages 3-10. Noon-3 p.m. Feb. 14. Free. Tri-County Mall, 11700 Princeton Rd., Springdale,

Wine tasting with your Sweetie — Presented by Woodstone Creek winery and distillery, choose from 10 craft spirits and 20 wines, dry to sweet, all made in Cincinnati. 1-6 p.m. Feb. 14. $3-$30. Woodstone Creek, 4712 Vine St., Saint Bernard,

<![CDATA[Cincinnati's Lightborne Communications Helped Create Katy Perry's Super Bowl Show]]>

When news came out yesterday that Katy Perry’s Super Bowl halftime show was the most-watched and highest-rated of any in history that featured entertainment, there was celebration at Lightborne Communications, the video-production-services company in Over-the-Rhine.

Lightborne created all the animated video projections used in Perry’s 12-and-a-half-minute set, which featured a medley of abbreviated versions of her hits amid phantasmagoric and theatrical staging, costumes, videos, dancing and set design.

And while Lightborne President Scott Durban was wary about taking too much credit — lots of artists, obviously including Perry herself, were involved in the show — he did note that no other company involved in the overall production was based in Cincinnati.

Lightborne got involved because its Tour Visuals and Stage Content division already had been working on Perry’s ongoing Prismatic World Tour. (It also has done or is working on video for tours by Kanye West, Kenny Chesney and Fleetwood Mac.)

Dan Bryant, the head of that division, explained Lightborne’s involvement with Perry’s Super Bowl performance:

“We started working on the project very shortly after she was announced in October as the half-time performer,” Bryant said. “We had done over two hours of content for her Prism tour, so she was already familiar with our company and work. We got a call from her creative director, Baz Halpin, asking us to work on her Super Bowl show.

“As soon as we found out her set list, we started working with [Halpin] for some concepts that would work with the logistics and constraints of the show,” Bryant continued. “We started doing individual frames to capture the overall idea for a particular song. That process went into November. Once we arrived at a concept for each song that everybody was happy with, we started storyboarding them out to give an idea of what the flow of ideas would be for each song.

“Then in December we started doing animatics, taking all the different frames we created and stringing them out to songs in still-frame form so everybody could get an idea of what it would look like when finally animated. That took us to the middle of December,” he said.

“Then we started animating ideas to rough tracks for her Super Bowl medley. That’s when we started using a really amazing piece of software called D3. It’s simulation software, specifically designed about 10 years ago to simulate any live event on a software platform.”

Eventually, after some intermediary steps, Lightborne had a working 3D model of the University of Phoenix Stadium, the performance stage and all the key props. Its crew started loading its animations into that.

“It gave everybody on our team, including Katy herself, a really good idea of what our animated content would look like when projected onto a 160-foot diameter surface,” Bryant said. “That’s when it gets really exciting because you start seeing the idea come to life.”

In January, a four-person Lightborne team went out to Los Angeles to participate in rehearsals. A few days before the Super Bowl, everyone involved moved to Phoenix to rehearse in the actual venue.

Although everything went fine, Bryant said there was great nervousness as the actual Super Bowl game began. Lightborne was counting on some degree of darkness for Perry’s show.

“The first and second quarter went by extremely quickly, and my team on location in Phoenix and everybody else with the show was getting nervous because it was still light outside,” Bryant said. “They had the dome roof open and 15 minutes to show time it was still bright sunshine outside and the field was being hit by sunlight. Luckily some things happened in the game that had the quarter slow down, so it went off without a hitch."

Watch the full performance:

<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List (12/19-12/21)]]>

Since Christmas is next week (Thursday), there's a ton of holiday stuff to do this weekend — everything from plays and other onstage events to train displays and elves doing things.

  • Every Christmas Story Ever Told (and then some) (through Dec. 28 at Cincy Shakes): For seven seasons this mash-up of holiday tales has played to sold-out Cincinnati Shakespeare audiences. It starts as an annual performance of A Christmas Carol but goes off the tracks almost immediately to poke fun at the season and the stories we all remember — Rudolph, Frosty the Snowman, The Island of Lost Toys, The Nutcracker, even It’s a Wonderful Life.
  • A Soldier's Christmas (through Dec. 21 at NKU's Corbett Theatre): Last summer Cincinnati Opera presented Silent Night, a retelling of the 1914 “Christmas Truce,” when World War I forces set aside their battles and marked the holiday. Local playwright Phil Paradis has rendered this story into a play that is being presented for the holidays. Two soldiers — one British, the other German — meet by chance as they seek warmth for their respective trenches.
  • Forever Plaid: Plaid Tidings (through Dec. 21 at Covedale): The late-’50s singing group of Francis, Jinx, Smudge and Sparky died when a bus full of Catholic schoolgirls on their way to see the Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show crashed into the Plaids’ car as they drove to an audition. In the sequel, they’re on a mission with heavenly guidance from Rosemary Clooney, who tells them harmony is needed to cheer a discordant world.
  • Amahl and the Night Visitors (Dec. 19-22 at Xavier University's Gallagher Center Theater): Amahl and the Night Visitors is Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra’s annual holiday gift, a multi-media extravaganza of the Christmas classic originally written for television in 1951. Gian Carlo Menotti’s one-act opera of the crippled boy Amahl and his encounter with the three wise men on their way to Bethlehem is a celebration of music, magic and miracles.
  • And, of course, A Christmas Carol (through Dec. at the Playhouse in the Park): Howard Dallin’s excellent adaptation has been used since 1991. The Playhouse’s A Christmas Carol features one of the Cincinnati area’s best local actors, Bruce Cromer, as Scrooge for the 10th consecutive year.
Off-stage but still holiday-ish


  • Grab a friend or family member and head to Fountain Square for some ice skating. The ice rink is up through Jan. 4, 2015 — and this weekend is the last weekend to skate with santa. The man in red hits the ice for some skate time on Saturday and Sunday.
  • BB Riverboats is offering a variety of holiday-themed cruises, including a Christian Moerlein Brew Ho Ho Ho dinner cruise with beer tastings on Saturday.  
  • The Cyclones are throwing an ugly sweater party during their game against the Elmira, N.Y. Jackals on Saturday. 
  • For an enlightening holiday experience, head to Union Terminal on Saturday and Sunday for their two-day Winter Solstice Celebration, highlighting end of year traditions like Chinese New Year, Diwali and Kwanzaa.
  • Take that a step further Sunday for the annual Lighting of the Serpent at Serpent Mound. Volunteers will light luminaries along the coils of the ancient effigy mound. 
  • And, another thing to see at Union Terminal: Holiday Junction. The Duke Energy trains are back through Jan. 4, 2015, with 300 mini rain cars, 60 engines and 1,000 feet of sparkly, snow-covered track. 
Over the Rhine

  • Folk duo Over the Rhine is continuing their annual Christmas tradition of performing a holiday concert at the Taft. Expect to hear songs from their recently released Blood Oranges in the Snow Saturday night.
  • Nashville, Tenn. quartet Steelism packed the house at this year's Midpoint Music Festival. Expect a similar crowd when the band plays MOTR Friday.
  • Guitar ace Adrian Belew plays the 20th Century Theater Sunday.
For more of what's going on this weekend (besides some last-minute gift shopping), check out our staff picks here.