CityBeat - Haunted Handbook http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/articles.sec-219-1-haunted_handbook.html <![CDATA[Bobby Mackey's Music World - ]]> According to the stories, Satanists took over this building and began using the basement to perform ritual animal sacrifices. They would discard many of the dead animals in the well in the basement. The stories go on to say that these Satanists were connected to the area’s most famous homicide: the murder of Pearl Bryan.]]> <![CDATA[Price Hill Potter's Field - ]]> When the cholera epidemic struck Cincinnati in 1849, there was a desperate need for cemeteries throughout the city. Many were created based on the religious faith of those buried there, but there was also the need for potter’s fields—cemeteries built on non-consecrated ground for those too poor or too ‘evil’ to be buried in faith-specific graveyards.]]> <![CDATA[Sleeper's Hill Sedamsville Woods - ]]> In the 1950s a man whose last name was Sleeper lived in a farmhouse up on this hill. He was a hermit, and he hated when anyone trespassed onto his property. He would take out his gun and chase them away. Other times he would chase people away with an axe, or he would even sometimes set his bull loose to chase the trespassers away.]]> <![CDATA[Walton Creek Theater - ]]> The ghost here seems to be quite angry with those who enter the building. People will hear whispers from unknown sources telling them to get out. Recently, this phenomenon was reported by a sound technician who was working on a production. He left the building in terror as these phantom voices whispered to him.]]> <![CDATA[Introducing Cincinnati Haunted Handbook - From authors Jeff Morris and Michael Morris]]> In the Haunted Handbook you’ll find one hundred locations within the Greater Cincinnati area, which is large enough to offer quite a number of stories but small enough that local people have some sense of where to go. We did our best to ensure that no two locations in the book were more than an hour apart. We’ve found at least one place in nearly every area of the city. We feel that this book is the quintessential guide for hunting ghosts in the Greater Cincinnati area.]]> <![CDATA[Daytripping (or in this case, Nighttripping) - Six pre-planned trips covering a variety of themed locations]]> You can explore several haunted in one shot with these frightful themed trips. Choose from a paranormal pub crawl, an urban legend trip, a road tour of Harrison Avenue, a demons of southwest Ohio trip, a roadside phantoms journey and a blast from the past with ghosts of the Civil War. This is your perfect compendium to the Cincinnati Haunted Handbook.]]> <![CDATA[Harrison Avenue's Dead Man's Curve - ]]> Many accidents have occurred on this stretch of road between Miamitown and Harrison. Most of these accidents happened in the mid-1900s. During this time, Harrison Avenue was the major artery of traffic through the area. At least fifty-two serious injuries or fatalities have occurred in vehicular accidents on Dead Man’s Curve.]]> <![CDATA[Coney Island - ]]> Sometimes people will hear Indians chanting in the darkness, long after the park has closed. Other times people will witness strange fogs, which settle over the park—and only the park. Perhaps these fogs are giving the ghosts some privacy as they play, and the merry-go-round is haunted.]]> <![CDATA[Taft Museum of Art - ]]> The most widely reported figure in the building is the “woman in pink.” Some people claim she is the ghost of Anna Taft. She appears on the balcony in the back of the building, most often when there is some sort of event in the courtyard. People will recognize her from old photographs.]]> <![CDATA[Mount Notre Dame High School - ]]> All the ghostly activity in this building seems to be confined to the third floor. It is assumed that the ghost here is the young girl who committed suicide. Sometimes when the girls arrive for school, they will discover that all of the lockers in this year of the school have been mysteriously opened.]]> <![CDATA[Spring Grove Cemetery - ]]> The most famous ghost story of Spring Grove cemetery involves the grave of an optometrist named C.C. Breuer. The story goes that when Breuer died, he asked that his eyes be removed from his body and placed into a bronze bust that was placed on the grave marker.]]>