CityBeat - Lost in the Supermarket http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/articles.sec-207-1-lost_in_the_supermarket.html <![CDATA[Instant Coffee: A Reconsideration - ]]>

On a recent supermarket visit, I gathered up a handful of various brands to see if my disdain for instant coffee has been justified.

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<![CDATA[Nuts About Nut Butter - ]]>

Once primarily the domain of health food stores, nut butters that aren’t peanut butter (or are variations on the peanut butter theme) have been popping up with greater frequency in average neighborhood supermarkets.


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<![CDATA[Lay's Ask for Another Flavor Favor - ]]>

Lay's "Do Us a Flavor" contest returns this year with a little bit of a bigger scope.

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<![CDATA[Junk: It’s What’s for Breakfast - ]]>

Thanks to a nobly health-food-conscious mother, growing up I was never allowed to wake up and eat a bowl of the alluring, overly sugared cereal that I would marvel over at the grocery store — packaged in boxes adorned with cartoon characters and often containing toys.

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<![CDATA[Party Like It's Your Birthday - ]]>

The more prominent flavor trends of the past few years have succeeded in creating buzz and profits, but often there’s a limited shelf life for seasonal tastes. Who wants a Pumpkin Spice Latte in the middle of August? Who eats “peppermint stick” anything after December?

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<![CDATA[Crest Makes a “Be” Line for Millennial Wallets - ]]>

Rolled out under the “Crest Be” banner, the new line of toothpastes doesn’t even pretend to be anything more than a novelty.

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<![CDATA[Ben & Jerry's Gets to the Core - ]]>

At the end of February, excitable news outlets and social media foodies were whirring about a new line of ice cream from a company that has a lot of experience in crafting clever twists on frozen favorites: Ben & Jerry’s.


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<![CDATA[Reminiscing in the Supermarket - ]]> In January of 2010, I wrote my very first Lost in the Supermarket column, investigating the weird little items I’d always seen at the neighborhood grocery store and wondered, “What the hell is tha]]> <![CDATA[Shilling the Savory/Sweet Sensation - ]]> The mix of salty snacks and sweet snacks is one of the latest food fads the marketing departments of major food corporations have been trying to convince consumers they should be engaging with.It’s ]]> <![CDATA[The Clunky Rebranding of Hot Pockets - ]]> For decades, Hot Pockets, those frozen, microwavable sandwich-like products found in practically every grocery and convenience store nationwide, led a fairly unspectacular existence. With the main sel]]> <![CDATA[Golf Legends and the AriZona Beverage Company - ]]> A recent study found that athletes who endorse unhealthy food and beverages create the illusion (especially for kids) that those products are far healthier than they actually are. LeBron James is in a]]> <![CDATA[Fall Flavor Sensation: Pumpkin Pie - ]]> This year, building on a decade’s worth of word-of-mouth buzz (specifically in the past few years on social media), Starbucks has received an inordinate amount of attention and press all due t]]> <![CDATA[Around the World in Eight Items (or Less): Cold Drinks - ]]> In this installment of Around the World in Eight Items (or Less), an exploration of the “International Aisle” at your neighborhood grocery store, I set out to examine some cold, imported beverages from across the globe.
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<![CDATA[Fast Food, Slow - ]]> Except perhaps in remote rural neighborhoods, fast food restaurants are like gas stations — they are everywhere. Wherever you are right now, there is more likely than not a McDonald’s, Wendy’s or other such restaurant within a short walk or drive.
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<![CDATA[Around the World in Eight Items or Less: Sweets - ]]> The “International Aisles” at chain supermarkets have evolved greatly over the past couple of decades. Though they probably vary depending on what part of the country you’re in, most I’ve seen play up the “international” flavor of the designated aisle with national flags and foods categorized by country.]]> <![CDATA[Gettin' Jack'd on Snacks and Gum - ]]> A couple of months ago, this column examined the rise of non-drinkable caffeinated products on your local supermarket shelves. It was inspired by news of two forthcoming products coming from a pair of major corporations, but they hadn’t hit local shelves yet, so I sought out other “edible speed” instead.
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<![CDATA[The Long, Complex Ride to Superfood Stardom - ]]> One of the rising stars of U.S. supermarket aisles, particularly for the health conscious, is quinoa. If you browse the health food racks, you’ve certainly seen an increase in products that tout their quinoa content.]]> <![CDATA[The Need for (Edible) Speed - ]]> Why would Ed Hardy make mints? Because these mints — King Dog Energy Mints — have a little extra party juice in them. They are “intensely caffeinated”; five mints equal (according to the packaging) a cup of coffee. (Having tried them, I can attest to those numbers.)]]> <![CDATA[A Chippy Election Cycle - ]]> According to an AP report, for the first time in Lay’s history, the corporation is allowing “fans” the opportunity to choose its next chip flavor. ]]> <![CDATA[Yogurt Goes Greek - ]]> Here’s the big secret, for those who haven’t tasted “Greek yogurt” — while some claim it’s creamier (maybe, barely), less sweet and more sour, it really tastes practically exactly the same as regular supermarket yogurt.]]>