CityBeat - Curtain Call http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/articles.sec-20-1-curtain_call.html <![CDATA[Girl Power at the Playhouse - ]]>

Nearly 30 percent of Playhouse premieres were written or co-created by women, significantly more than the 22-percent figure researched by the Lilly Awards and the Dramatists Guild for shows by women produced by American theaters during seasons between 2011 and 2014.


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<![CDATA[Writing About Theater - ]]> Last month I had an opportunity to attend an evening get-together with a group of volunteers with the League of Cincinnati Theatres who are writing regularly about local productions, providing previews of shows as well as critiques.]]> <![CDATA[Theater in New York City - ]]> In November I was in New York City for a gathering of the American Theatre Critics Association. I saw five Broadway shows, listened to some informative panel discussions and attended a luncheon at Sardi’s with an array of Broadway performers.]]> <![CDATA[Ed Stern’s ‘Youth’ - ]]>

Ed Stern “retired” three years ago after two decades of artistic leadership at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. I put quotation marks around that word because he’s still busy as can be, much to the surprise of everyone — himself included.

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<![CDATA[Who’s on First? - ]]>

I frequently extol the virtues of Cincinnati’s theaters. They are a subset, of course, of a vibrant arts scene — one that a friend of mine often says “fights above its weight class.”

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<![CDATA[Common Ground: Creative and Weird - ]]>

Trey Tatum and Paul Strickland grew up just 45 miles apart — Tatum in southern Alabama and Strickland in Florida’s Panhandle. But they didn’t meet until their paths crossed in Cincinnati during the Fringe Festival in June 2014.

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<![CDATA[Fathers, Sons and Theatrical Honesty - ]]>

Some plays become classics because they last across time — Shakespeare’s plays are still produced after 400 years. That’s what’s usually onstage at the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, but they also dig into more recent “classics,” qualified by elemental stories that burn fiercely.

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<![CDATA[Struggling with Understanding: CCM’s ‘Pentecost’ - ]]>

Theater programs at our universities in Greater Cincinnati often produce shows that not only offer educational opportunities for students, but also expose us to works we have lost track of or missed. David Edgar’s Pentecost is such a work, and it accomplishes what Richard Hess likes to do — challenge audiences.

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<![CDATA[‘Cyrano’ Fell From the Moon - ]]>

Edmond Rostand’s play, like its hero, seems to have fallen unexpectedly from the moon. Cyrano de Bergerac was a surprising instant hit in Paris late in 1897. Its premiere received an hour-long standing ovation, and it was subsequently performed for 200 consecutive nights.

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<![CDATA[Power Down — and Prepare for Bliss - ]]>

For the past two Septembers I’ve written columns about theater etiquette. In 2013, my headline was “Behave Yourself,” and last year I updated it to “Behave Yourself 2.0.” Please don’t think me old-fashioned, but it’s time for another reminder — I’m not the only one concerned about this.

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<![CDATA[Counting on Women Playwrights - ]]>

“The Count,” a recent study of hundreds of theater productions nationwide between 2012 and 2015 at nonprofit theaters such as the Playhouse in the Park and others in Cincinnati, revealed that roughly one-fifth were written by women. That’s an improvement over a decade ago, but it’s a long way from parity.

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<![CDATA[Lessons Learned: Theater Educator Dee Anne Bryll - ]]>

If you read playbills carefully, you’ve probably seen Dee Anne Bryll’s name. She’s worked at most every theater in town — from the Playhouse to the Covedale Center, from Northern Kentucky University to University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, plus countless engagements with local schools.

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<![CDATA[Know Is Ready to Rock with ‘Hundred Days’ - ]]>

Fasten your seat belt — here comes the 2015-2016 theater season. Know Theatre gets bragging rights for being first out of the local theater gate with Hundred Days, a Rock & Roll show it played a significant part in developing.

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<![CDATA[Theater League Gets Its Act Together - ]]>

The League of Cincinnati Theatres was established in 1999 to strengthen, nurture and promote local theater companies. 

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<![CDATA[A Big Bowl of ‘Serials!’ at Know - ]]>

Know Theatre’s Tamara Winters is straightforward when asked why the Over-the-Rhine theater launched Serials! a year ago: “We wanted to give audiences a reason to keep coming back. We keep bringing it back because it’s working!”

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<![CDATA[Final Thoughts on the 2015 Cincy Fringe - ]]>

The 2015 Cincinnati Fringe Festival wrapped up last Saturday, but the glow continues.

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<![CDATA[Cincinnati Fringe: Community, Camaraderie and Passion - ]]> The 13th annual Cincinnati Fringe is under way. Shows start Wednesday and continue through June 6. CityBeat writers will attend the opening performance of every production and provide next-day reviews]]> <![CDATA[Games of Life and Learning: 'Circle Mirror Transformation' - ]]> Wendy Goldberg knows her way around new plays. After two decades of staging them, mostly in Chicago, she moved to Connecticut to lead the O’Neill Theatre Center...]]> <![CDATA[Christopher Durang's Chekhovian Blender - ]]> Christopher Durang got an early start as a playwright. “When I was 8,” he told The Juilliard Journal (he teaches playwriting at the Juilliard School), “I announced to my mother I was going to write a play. It was my own two-page version of an I Love Lucy episode...]]> <![CDATA[The Future of American Theater: a Report From Louisville - ]]> I spent last weekend in Kentucky at the Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville watching a half-dozen brand new works. The festival is an invigorating whirl of creativity, conviviality and engaging performances.]]>