CityBeat - Fringe http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/articles.sec-196-1-fringe.html <![CDATA[Swimming in the Shallows (Review - Critic's Pick) - ]]> The 2013 Fringe has provided a final showcase for a half-dozen talented performers to shine in their own light in a production of Adam Bock’s absurdist comedy.

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<![CDATA[Confessions of a Cat Lady (with a side of crazy) (Review) - ]]> Confessions of a Cat Lady is a high-speed Fringe experience — a weird, wild, very funny night of theater.

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<![CDATA[This Is One Shitty Party (Review) - ]]> This is One Shitty Party isn't. But it isn't great either. The Fringe offering from New York City’s Endless Chili Productions bills itself as an immersive, interactive show about a 30th birthday party where the audience plays the role of guests and friends.

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<![CDATA[Telephone: A Prequel to a Love Story (Review - Critic's Pick) - ]]> This smart, quick-moving, three-person show pulls in video to advance the plot and underline what's going on and frequently makes sly fun of theatrical conventions.

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<![CDATA[Butcher Holler Here We Come (Review) - ]]> Brooklyn-based Aztec Economy’s production provides an intense, funny, scary, dark experience for a little over an hour regarding the effects of a cave collapse on five coal miners.

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<![CDATA[Lolita: A Three Man Show (Review - Critic's Pick) - ]]> Four Humors’ Lolita achieves three remarkable things: It honors the source material; it let’s us know that the revered plot is downright horrifying; and it is side-splittingly hilarious from start to finish.

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<![CDATA[Mater Facit (Review) - ]]> Broken into about 10 scenes that are strung together only with that theme, the piece bounces between hokey humor, tuneful songs, Stomp-like dance sequences and good old-fashioned stand-and-deliver monologues.

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<![CDATA[Petunia and Chicken (Review - Critic's Pick) - ]]> Sick of cynicism? Sarcasm overload? Impatient with imps and people who cut in line? You need a love-laden dose of Petunia and Chicken!

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<![CDATA[Loon (Review - Critic's Pick) - ]]> Last year’s charming Wonderheads production of Grim and Fischer was one of the “Pick of the Fringe” winners, and deservedly so. If anything, Loon is even better

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<![CDATA[The Elephant in My Closet (Review - Critic's Pick) - ]]> The 2013 Fringe offering from New York City’s Keeping Watch company chronicles David Lee Nelson’s journey to arrive at the moment he comes out to his father as a Democrat. 

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<![CDATA[Questions of the Heart: Gay Mormons and the Search For Identity (Review) - ]]> The question of gay sexuality and the Mormon church is not an easy one for Ben Abbott. Even after this massive project, beyond prayer, he sees no clear path. 

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<![CDATA[Choose Your Own Adventure (Review) - ]]> Although this production has a definite DIY feel, there’s a sense of whimsy and spontaneity that’s earnest and yet effortless for the dancers and, especially, narrator Miranda McGee.

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<![CDATA[Ain’t True and Uncle False (Review) - ]]> Comedian, storyteller and musician Paul Strickland from Indianapolis does something clever with this one-man show: He applies the tropes and archetypes of the ancient oral storyteller to mythologize trailer parks. 

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<![CDATA[The Space Between My Head and My Body (Review) - ]]>

O’Keefe’s script is poetic, thoughtful and evocative. The cleverly designed program (resembling the safety information brochure found in the seatback pocket when you travel by air) suggests “somewhere between departure and arrival, you can be anyone.” Or, perhaps, no one.



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<![CDATA[Panorama Ephemera (Review) - ]]>  Panorama Ephemera offers no easy answers, but credit must be given for creating a wholly exclusive experience. If you choose to make this a part of your personal Fringe experience, however, be prepared for a cold, calculating question mark rather than a bold, loud exclamation point.

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<![CDATA[Poe and Mathews: A Misadventure in the Middle of Nowhere (Review) - ]]> The actors and the show were absolutely at their best during unscripted moments — hearing the Coffee Emporium phone ring, accidentally hitting the ceiling fan above the stage, calling attention to the lack of off-stage space during the show — events that elicited the strongest laughs of the night.]]> <![CDATA[A.J. Raffles: Amateur Cracksman (Review) - ]]>  Playwright Andrew Hungerford had a solid foundation for his very silly 2013 Fringe show, A. J. Raffles: Amateur Cracksman. It was, in fact, a series of stories in the 1890s and a 1904 play (titled Raffles, The Amateur Cracksman). Victorian writer E. W. Hornung created the character somewhat in response to the work of his brother-in-law Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, whose Sherlock Holmes was all the rage.

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<![CDATA[We Put the F.U.N. in Funeral (Review) - We Put the F.U.N. In Funeral, Cincy Fringe Festival, SCPA Black Box, Fringenext ]]> Teenagers look critically at the grownup world, perhaps because they know they'll be there themselves before long, and they often don't like what they see. The School for Creative and Performing Arts students who put together We Put the F.U.N. in Funeral certainly fall into that number, and interpret their title in the most ironic sense.

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<![CDATA[The Wave (Review - Critic's Pick) - ]]>  A note in the program says that Ron “wanted to deter his students from the allure of totalitarianism.” My impression is that explanation was merely an excuse he gave one student’s parent. Whatever Ron’s original pedagogical motives were, those motives dissolve with his innocence as he takes on the lascivious appeal of power.

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<![CDATA[In Which I Set Myself on Fire (Review) - ]]> Hayley Powell’s In Which I Set Myself on Fire is a noble effort to give shape to a complex idea — the collective reality of shared experience, the mental synchronicity that happens among close friends. ]]>