CityBeat - Lit http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/articles.sec-191-1-lit.html <![CDATA[Secrets and Lies with Leah Stewart - ]]>

Oscar Wilde said, “The truth is rarely pure and never simple.” The way we keep secrets and tell lies is at the heart of Leah Stewart’s latest novel, The New Neighbor

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<![CDATA[Crow Fair - Thomas McGuane (Knopf)]]>

The slyly ironic, superbly crafted and often hysterical 17 short stories that comprise Crow Fair prove Thomas McGuane is America’s preeminent chronicler of “Big Sky” country and the “new American West.”

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<![CDATA[Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War On Drugs - Johann Hari (Bloomsbury)]]>

In this groundbreaking and controversial manifesto, we join Johann Hari on his three-year investigation — a kind of “trail of tears” that traverses nine countries, covers 30,000 miles and tracks the lives of countless individuals whose lives have been caught up in the maelstrom of the so-called “Drug War.”

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<![CDATA[Going Underground with Jim DeBrosse - ]]> Veteran newspaper reporter Jim DeBrosse’s Hidden City, set in, around and below the streets of Cincinnati, is a tour de force mystery thriller that also addresses many of the city’s social and political problems.]]> <![CDATA[Small Victories - Anne Lamott (Riverhead Books)]]> Anne Lamott, author of her seventh book on spirituality, Small Victories, is nothing if not unique. The 60-year-old Northern California grandmother is a nature-loving, earthy-crunchy hiker/skier; she’s also a self-described “narcissist,” politically to the left of Chairman Mao and a member of a predominantly black Baptist church.]]> <![CDATA[West of Sunset - Stewart O'Nan (Viking)]]> In 1937, with America still clawing out of the Great Depression, F. Scott Fitzgerald was in big trouble. After years of what the Irish call “too much drink,” the party was over and Scott was in poor health.]]> <![CDATA[Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good - Kathleen Flinn (Viking)]]>

Every New Year offers the opportunity to look forward to the future, reflect on the past and consider those who have enriched our lives.

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<![CDATA[Redeployment - Phil Klay (The Penguin Press)]]>

Phil Klay’s extraordinary short story collection Redeployment, winner of 2014’s National Book Award for fiction, chronicles America’s ill conceived, futile and costly Iraqi occupation.

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<![CDATA[Lila - Marilynne Robinson (Farrer, Strauss and Giroux)]]>

Marilynne Robinson’s Lila is an achingly beautiful and deeply spiritual meditation on life, love, humility, loss, redemption and, ultimately, the divine presence of grace.

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<![CDATA[My Life as a Foreign Country: A Memoir - Brian Turner (Norton)]]>

This deeply thoughtful and imaginative memoir seamlessly weaves together many wars throughout history, while Turner tells of his own experiences during two tours of duty in Iraq.

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<![CDATA[David Bell Continues His Mysterious Ways in ‘The Forgotten Girl’ - ]]>

Cincinnati native David Bell’s latest thriller, The Forgotten Girl, centers on Jason Danvers, a 45-year-old graphic designer in small-town Ohio whose comfortable existence is seriously altered when his wayward younger sister re-enters his life.

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<![CDATA[Fourth of July Creek - Smith Henderson (Ecco)]]> First-time novelist Smith Henderson’s Fourth of July Creek is the story of a social worker named Pete Snow who is caught in the web of a world gone wrong.
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<![CDATA[High as the Horses Bridles - Scott Cheshire (Henry Holt and Company)]]> High as the Horses’ Bridles, the debut novel by Scott Cheshire, is about what happens after a 12-year-old boy-prophet named Josiah Laudermilk delivers an impassioned apocalyptic sermon to a group of about 3,000 impassioned faithful.]]> <![CDATA[Walking the Steps of Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City’s Scenic and Historic Secrets - Mary Anna DuSablon Revised by Connie J. Harrell and John Cicmanec (Ohio University Press)]]>

Walking the Steps of Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City’s Scenic and Historic Secrets is a wholly delightful book that first appeared in 1998 and returns in a revised edition as the weather invites taking full advantage of its subject matter.

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<![CDATA[Love and Terror - Dorothy Weil (AuthorHouse)]]>

Dorothy Weil’s new novel, Love and Terror, takes place in a past so recent that we’ve all been there — the middle of the 21st century’s first decade — and is set in a place we know just as well, Cincinnati.

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<![CDATA[Visions of Cincinnati - The Cincinnati Anthology looks at our rapidly changing city in myriad ways ]]>

Cincinnati is changing. Nowhere is this fact more apparent than in our once-sleepy downtown. From The Banks to Over-the-Rhine, from Fountain Square to Washington Park, the urban core is alive with activity.

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<![CDATA[To Rise Again At A Decent Hour - Joshua Ferris (Little, Brown and Company)]]> While it may indeed be an urban folk tale that dentists have a higher rate of suicide than other professions, there’s no doubt that, like pimpin’, dentistry ain’t easy.]]> <![CDATA[The Corpse Exhibition - Hassan Blasim (Translated by Jonathan Wright) (Penguin Books)]]> Since our botched invasion and futile occupation of Iraq, there have been several excellent accounts of this costly, deadly debacle —unfortunately all written from the perspective of American and other Western-based writers.]]> <![CDATA[Queen City Reading - A cornucopia of Cinci-centric books hits the market]]>

It’s not so unusual when local authors write books about this region — there’s a burgeoning market for it, actually, in Cincinnati and elsewhere.

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<![CDATA[Rust Belt Prophet - Author David Giffels discusses his ode to Akron]]> Rust Belt towns across the upper Midwest are on the verge of oblivion, their economies hallowed out by technological innovation and globalization. Yet many are not ready to give up on blue-collar bastions like Akron, Ohio, as David Giffels’ new book attests.
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