CityBeat - Blogs http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/blogs.engine.php <![CDATA[Morning News and Stuff]]>

Hey all. Today is Indiana’s primary. Go vote if you live in Indiana. If you don’t live in Indiana, continue to gnash your teeth and pray that somehow this election season is simply some very long-term practical joke or a very committed performance art piece.

About the primary: On the GOP side, Donald Trump is leading in the polls. He’s enlisted the help of former Indiana University basketball coach and fellow freaky hair grower Bobby Knight to stump for him and occasionally throw chairs at the crowd/hecklers/his opponents. Formidable duo, to say the least. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, meanwhile, desperately needs a win tonight to keep his campaign afloat. He trails in the delegate count 565 to Trump’s 996 and so far has only managed to get in awkward arguments with folks in the Hoosier State. And then there’s Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who has been content to beg Indiana’s 57 delegates to consider switching their vote to him at a contested convention should Trump not reach the 1,237 delegates he needs to win the nomination outright. Solid strategy there.

• Meanwhile, on the Democrat side, Hillary Clinton and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders are running neck and neck in the state. That doesn’t matter much, because Clinton’s lead over Sanders all but guarantees her the Democratic nomination. Sanders is fighting on, however, and has vowed to take his battle all the way to the Democratic National Convention in July. A Sanders victory wouldn't get him much closer to clinching the nomination (an impossible goal at this point) but would continue to keep his agenda — banking reform, universal health care and fully funded college education, among other goals — on the radar as the election moves forward.

• While we’re talking elections, here’s an interesting piece exploring the challenges facing the GOP come November. Turns out, Republicans could win Ohio and still easily lose the general election, at least according to the scenarios mapped out here. That scenario involves the Democratic nominee scooping up the 19 states and D.C. that Dems have won in the last six elections and taking Florida. If America’s goatee goes blue, it’s pretty much over for the GOP’s presidential hopes.

• Let’s get back down to some local stuff, shall we? This one is just in time for Mother’s Day. It turns out Cincinnati is one of the best cities in the country for working mothers, at least according to a study by Realtor.com. Cincinnati placed sixth in the country according to the ranking, which considered female employment rate, salaries and other career opportunity factors, childcare available and cities’ affordability. As the product of a working mom, I say that’s really cool if true.

• Things are happening in East Walnut Hills. Specifically, development things. A new project featuring nine single-family homes starting at $500,000 has been announced by developer Traditions Building Group. Those homes will stand on the site of the former Seventh Presbyterian Church on Madison Road near DeSales Corner. Some elements of the church will be preserved, it appears. Elsewhere in East Walnut Hills, plans are developing to turn the former YMCA on East McMillan Street into market rate apartments. City Center Properties, which owns the building, has applied for local historic landmark status that could help redevelopment efforts of the 52,000-square-foot building. The specifics of the redevelopment plans aren’t available yet, however, and Cincinnati City Council would have to approve the request for historic status. The YMCA building was constructed in 1930.

• Statewide news time: U.S. Sens. Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman are pushing for millions in funding to test Ohio’s various water supplies for lead following the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan. Brown’s legislation advanced in the Senate yesterday and would provide $20 million for lead testing in schools and day care centers. It would provide funding for public health measures around lead poisoning and make available low-interest loans to states that need to upgrade drinking water infrastructure. The legislation is part of a larger $9.3 billion water reform bill currently before the Senate.

I’m out. Tweet at me. Email me. You know the drill.

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<![CDATA[Morning News and Stuff]]>

Good morning all. Did you run the pig this weekend? I thought about it. For a few seconds. That should count for something, right? No? OK. Let’s talk news then. There’s a bunch of politics transpiring. Here it is:

A new poll says that only 38 percent of Ohioans want Ohio Gov. John Kasich to stay in the GOP presidential primary, in contrast to the 49 percent who want him out. But there’s an even more striking number in the Public Policy Polling survey: Fifty-eight percent of GOP voters want Kasich to bail on the race, compared to just 33 percent who think he should stay in.

• Is this one reason why taxpayers are tired of Kasich’s run? The Columbus Dispatch reports that his presidential campaign is costing taxpayers plenty when it comes to his security detail. The nine state troopers assigned to protect Kasich at all times racked up 1,800 hours in overtime as of April 16, earning an extra $82,400 in public money.

• One more Kasich tidbit: Our Big Queso is working hard in Indiana to woo voters… but not the voters you’re thinking of. Kasich is mostly ignoring the state’s primary voters and taking his case directly to the state’s GOP delegates, who will decide the presidential nominee in case of a contested convention. After the first round of voting at such a convention, those delegates will become “unbound,” meaning they no longer have to vote for the candidate voters in their state selected.

• Cincinnati restaurant mogul Jeff Ruby has rescinded a $25,000 reward offer in relation to the recent massacre of eight people in Pike County. The execution-style killings of the Rhodan family have drawn national attention and led to speculation that a Mexican drug cartel might be responsible for the carnage after marijuana growing operations were found on the Rhodan’s properties. Ruby has nodded to that speculation as a reason he’s pulling his reward.

• A task force put together by Ohio lawmakers has recommended eliminating mandatory minimum drug sentencing laws in the state. A working group that is part of the Criminal Recodification Committee, which is charged with reforming the state’s drug laws, says that the minimums should go away and that new sentencing standards should be put in place. That could reduce Ohio’s prison population, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction says.

• Controversy in Kentucky, part 1: Comments Kenton County District Judge Ann Ruttle’s made while finding former Xavier women’s basketball coach Bryce McKey not guilty of sexual abuse have caused some consternation and concern. Ruttles said that the plaintiff in the case, who alleges McKey gave her alcohol when she was underage and touched her inappropriately, did not do enough to stop him and that her behavior was “almost... an invitation.” Advocates for sexual assault survivors have said that amounts to victim-blaming.  

• Controversy in Kentucky, part 2: Governor Matt Bevin late last week vetoed more than $300,000 in the Kentucky budget meant to help develop an 11-mile trail along the Northern Kentucky riverfront called Riverfront Commons. That will slow, but not stop, the project, which already has funds to establish portions of the trail in Dayton, Ludlow and Covington. Bevin cited “significant fiscal constraints” in the state for his decision. Trail boosters call the cut “disappointing.”

• Finally, this really is more the music section’s purview, but I’m going to mention it. Radiohead has erased nearly its entire web presence — tweets, Facebook, website, everything. Fans of the band and some music critics have speculated this is a sign of a new album on the way — the band is known for its innovative business and marketing (well, really, anti-marketing) approaches. But I have a more precise theory: Yorke and Co. are looking to capitalize on the increasingly prevalent nostalgia for the 1990s, a time blissfully before Twitter, Facebook, immersive website experiences, etc.

Prediction: The next Radiohead album will be announced on a new site that looks like something you’d make on Geocities circa OK Computer.

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<![CDATA[Stage Door]]>

Need suggestions for a good theater production to attend this weekend? Here are some good choices on Cincinnati stages.

Last night I attended the opening of Satchel Paige and the Kansas City Swing at the Cincinnati Playhouse. It’s an inventive recreation of the legendary African-American pitcher who found his fame eclipsed by Jackie Robinson. The changes wrought by events in 1947 affected both black and white Americans, and this play by Ricardo Khan and Trey Ellis explores them. They know their way around storytelling: Their play Fly, about the Tuskegee Airmen, was well received at the Playhouse in 2013. In this one, players from two teams of baseball all-stars, one black and one white, share a boarding house on a rainy night in Kansas City. We get to eavesdrop on what they might have talked about, their dreams, their grudges and their fates. Robert Karma Robinson wholly inhabits the role of Paige as an angular, grumpy philosopher of sports, race and life. It’s onstage through May 21. Tickets: 513-421-3888.

Before they wrote My Fair Lady and Camelot, the lyricist-composer team of Lerner and Loewe had a 1949 hit with the musical Brigadoon. It’s about a pair of American tourists who happen upon a mysterious town in Scotland that appears just once every century. Of course, one of the guys falls in love with a resident of the town — and that gets complicated. When I was six years old, I went to see this show with my very British grandfather, my first experience of musical theater. I still love the show, and I’ll be seeing it this weekend at the Covedale Center, where it will be onstage through May 22. Tickets: 513-241-6550.

Don’t shy away from Cincinnati Shakespeare’s production of Julius Caesar because you read it in high school. Set in ancient Rome, there’s as much political intrigue — and perhaps more danger — that you’d find in your average episode of House of Cards. Several fine acting performances make this production especially watchable: Brent Vimtrup gives a textured performance of the principled but conflicted Brutus; Josh Katawick is the “lean and hungry” Cassius who recruits the assassins who bring down Caesar; and Nick Rose is the wily Mark Antony who finds a way to turn Caesar’s death to his own advantage. Once you’ve seen this production, you should make plans to return for a kind of sequel as Cincy Shakes stages Antony and Cleopatra with several of the actors from Julius Caesar reprising their roles. Through May 7. Tickets: 513-381-2273.

Playwright Lauren Gunderson presented a quartet of badass women from 18th-century France in The Revolutionists at the Cincinnati Playhouse back in February. Some more strong females — Americans from the early 20th century — are the characters of Silent Sky, the current production at Know Theatre. The central character is Henrietta Leavitt, an aspiring astronomer who had to work doubly hard to earn recognition for her scientific insights. She’s bracketed by a devoted, conservative sister and a pair of “lunatic women” who are her scientific colleagues. Director Tamara Winters has an excellent cast of actors to tell this story — especially Maggie Lou Rader in a luminous portrait of the feisty, persistent Henrietta. Through May 14. Tickets: 513-300-5669.

Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati seldom brings back a show it’s presented in the past, but when it staged Jeanine Tesori’s musical Violet back in 1998, that was long before Over-the-Rhine was a go-to neighborhood for entertainment. So there’s a good rationale for reviving this lovely, heartfelt story. Check out this video preview. 


Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.
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<![CDATA[Morning News and Stuff]]>

Big things happened at Wednesday's City Council meeting. Council finally voted to approve the streetcar's operating budget for the first year after spending the last month squabbling and kicking it back and forth between council and committee. The budget just barely passed in a vote of 5-3, with council members Kevin Flynn, Christopher Smitherman and Charlie Winburn voting against it. Councilwoman Amy Murray was absent from the meeting. Mayor John Cranley, who previously said he would veto any operating budget that didn't get at least six votes, appears to have had enough of this streetcar drama. The mayor decided recently not to veto the budget even if it passed with a mere five votes.

Council also voted to approve a wage hike for city government workers, passing a bill that would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour for full-time workers and to $10.10 an hour for part-time and seasonal workers. The increase will affect about one out of every five city workers, or about 1,166 workers. Cranley, who introduced the ordinance last month, called council's decision "morally right" and hopes the state will follow suit.

• Students at Northern Kentucky University will see a slight increase in their tuition next year. The NKU Board of Regents voted to pass a 3 percent increase in undergraduate tuition on Wednesday to keep up with rising costs at the university and a decrease in funding from the state. Next year, Kentucky residents can expect to pay an average of $130 more per semester while Cincinnati residents will shell out an extra $200 per semester and nonresidents will pay an extra $260. 

• State Rep. Denise Driehaus is upset with the closure of the Little Miami Incinerator. The incinerator was closed temporarily earlier this month after it was determined that it does not meet federal pollution standards. It served as one of two ways that Hamilton County disposes of human waste, and it's unclear when, or if, it will reopen. Driehaus, who is currently running for Hamilton County commissioner in the upcoming November election, released a statement Thursday morning condemning county for allowing the closure that she saw as avoidable and called for new leadership to better address the issue. 

"This could have and should have been resolved." Driehaus says in the statement. "We need leadership on the County Commission that will roll up their sleeves and work to resolve challenging issues instead of being content to play the blame game when something goes wrong."  

• Since former Speaker of the House John Boehner resigned from his post last October, it seems he feels more free to express his true feelings about the GOP presidential candidates. At an event at Stanford University on Wednesday, Boehner called Texas Sen. Ted Cruz a "miserable son of a bitch." Boehner also disclosed that he and GOP frontrunner Donald Trump are "texting buddies" and that he is also friends with Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who is currently running way behind Trump and Cruz in the election. However, it seems he and Kasich aren't quite BFFs as he also said that their friendship "requires more effort."

• In other election news, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz announced yesterday that former Hewitt-Packard CEO and GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina will be his running mate. Fiorina was one of the first GOP candidates to drop out of the race and endorsed Cruz in early March. Cruz is the first of any presidential candidate to announce a running mate and his announcement comes a day after as frontrunner Trump just declared victory in five states' Tuesday primaries, bringing the real estate tycoon even closer to securing the GOP nomination.

Stay dry, Cincy! And send any news tips here.
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<![CDATA[Morning News and Stuff]]> Good morning all. Here’s your news today.

The operating budget for the Cincinnati streetcar again looks likely to move forward in City Council today, barring any major surprises. Of course, that was also the case a couple weeks ago, when the budget stumbled over some last-minute objections by Councilman Kevin Flynn around contingency funding. Flynn’s course reversal left the budget with only five votes, which was not enough to overcome a veto promised by Mayor John Cranley. So back to committee it went, where it passed again yesterday. Cranley has indicated he won’t veto the revised budget, which would move about $550,000 in leftover construction funds into a contingency account, even if it only gets five votes. Flynn thinks leftover construction money should be used for startup costs.

• Hey, this is creepy, though not totally unexpected. Crews working to seal off some asbestos in Music Hall found human remains under the orchestra pit. No, they aren’t what’s left of some unfortunate clarinetists who were a little pitchy in their renditions of Rhapsody in Blue’s opening glissando or timpanists who missed a beat or two in a conductor's favorite Bach piece. The remains, which archeological consultants Gray and Pape say probably belonged to four people, seem to be holdovers from the pit’s 1928 construction. The historic hall, as well as the land around it in Washington Park, spent two decades starting around 1818 as a burial ground for indigent residents. Many of those grave sites were moved in the 1850s, but some lingered, and apparently still do. When Music Hall construction began in 1876, workers were faced with the task of removing the remaining bodies to places like Spring Grove Cemetery. Far be it for me to critique someone else’s work, especially when it’s work that I wouldn’t go anywhere near, but… seems like they missed a few spots. In addition to the remains under the orchestra pit, workers also found a number of grave shafts full of wooden coffins.

• If you’re a frequent flyer, you know the struggle: The Cincinnati Northern Kentucky International Airport, or CVG, used to be the last resort when you wanted to take a flight on the cheap. Places like Dayton and Louisville — or even Columbus — were cheaper enough to fly from that it made the drive worth it. But not any more, apparently. CVG’s fares are now lower than Dayton and Louisville’s airports, and the lowest they’ve been relative to other airports in more than 20 years. That’s in part due to the increase in airlines flying out of CVG, including low-cost carriers like Allegiant Air. CVG still trails Columbus and Indianapolis in terms of affordability, but not by as much as in the past, when our airport was the third-most expensive in the country. These days, it’s 22nd.

• As you might have guessed, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and real estate mogul Donald Trump came up big winners in yesterday’s GOP primaries. Trump swept every county in Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island, extending his delegate count to 949 of the 1,237 he needs to clinch the GOP nomination. Meanwhile, Clinton won in all those states except Rhode Island, where her challenger, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, prevailed. Clinton’s victories put the Democratic nomination all but out of reach for Sanders, though he’s vowed to stay in the race. Meanwhile, Trump has also solidified his position as the GOP frontrunner — his second-place opponent, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, has only 544 delegates. Third-place contender, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, has just 153 — fewer than U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, who dropped out of the race weeks ago.

• With an ever-clearer picture of who the nominees for each party are likely to be, the frontrunners’ eyes are turning to the general election. And there are signs it’s gonna be an ugly, ugly race. Perhaps feeling his oats after his decisive victories, Trump yesterday bashed Clinton, saying that she’s only winning primaries because she’s a woman. If you thought Trump might tone it down for the general election in a bid to get more mainstream swing voters, including, you know, women, well… don’t hold your breath for too long on that. Key quote from Trump:

She is a woman, she is playing the woman card left and right,” Mr. Trump told CNN in a post-primary interview. “Frankly, if she didn’t, she would do very poorly. If she were a man and she was the way she is, she would get virtually no votes."
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<![CDATA[Morning News and Stuff]]>

Good morning all. Hope your weekend was as perfect as mine. Let’s talk about news real quick.

Vice Mayor David Mann says the private foundation that raises money for Cincinnati Parks Board should open its books to public scrutiny. The Cincinnati Parks Foundation, a nonprofit group, came under scrutiny last year during a contentious bid for a property tax levy to fund parks improvements put forward by Mayor John Cranley. Voters passed on that proposal, but not before it was revealed that the park board spent money from the foundation on pro-levy campaigns. After the election, further revelations about board spending on travel and perks drew increased scrutiny to the parks board and triggered a city audit. Now, Mann says the foundation should undergo similar scrutiny.

• Speaking of investigations: Are the feds really looking into MSD? Last year, The Enquirer reported that Cincinnati’s metropolitan sewer district was under the microscope of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, presumably over its implementation of a multi-billion-dollar federal order to revamp the city’s sewer system. However, the FBI hasn’t asked for any of the things you’d expect if it was indeed probing the large public department, the Businss Courier reports. No subpoenas have been filed, no hard drives have been seized and no documents have been requested. If there’s truly an investigation happening, it’s very low-key.

• The state of Kentucky could allocate $10 million to revamp a highway exit leading to the religiously-themed Ark Encounter theme park. Watchdog group Americans United for Separation of Church and State has cried foul at that expenditure, saying it amounts to Kentucky using taxpayer dollars to benefit a religious group. The money for the ramp improvements on I-75 and KY 36 made its way into the state’s budget, which is currently in the process of being passed. AUSCS says it doesn’t have any plans as of yet to oppose the money, but says it is continuing to watch the situation. Ark park owners Answers in Genesis say an earlier ruling allowing Kentucky to give tax incentives to the site has answered questions about the legality of such expenditures.

• The mass shooting of eight people in Piketon, Ohio last week has left more questions than answers, and authorities say they’re preparing for a long investigation. All eight victims were related and the shootings happened at three sites close to each other. Authorities say the shootings were expertly planned and executed and noted that two of the three crime scenes contained significant marijuana growing operations. Investigators have not commented on any possible link between the operations and the killings.

• The city of Cleveland has settled a lawsuit with the family of Tamir Rice, who was shot and killed in November 2014 by a Cleveland police officer. The family will get $6 million from the city. A Cuyahoga County grand jury declined to indict officer Timothy Loehmann in that incident. Loehmann leapt from a police cruiser that had stopped feet away from Rice at a Cleveland playground and almost immediately shot him. Rice, 12, had been playing with a toy pistol on the playground when a neighbor called the police. The caller stipulated the gun was probably fake, but dispatchers did not relay that information to officers.

• Do you ever think, "jeez, more papers should be like The Cincinnati Enquirer?" You may be in luck. Gannett, the national corporation that owns the Enquirer as well as USA Today and a number of other publications, has made an offer to buy Tribune Publishing, another large national newspaper chain. Gannett has offered $815 million for the chain, which includes The Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune and other daily newspapers.

• Ohio Gov. John Kasich and U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, both GOP presidential primary hopefuls, will collaborate in future primaries to try and trip up frontrunner Donald Trump as he charges toward the party’s nomination. The Kasich campaign has indicated it will focus efforts on New Mexico and Oregon while staying out of Indiana in a move to help Cruz best Trump in that state. In return, Cruz has agreed to stay out of the two western states in a bid to give Kasich the edge over Trump there. The move — which will present Trump with one focused opponent in upcoming contests, instead of the split field he’s faced up to this point — seems calculated toward denying him the 1,137 delegates needed to clinch the nomination outright. Kasich in particular is counting on a contested convention in July, since he badly trails in the delegate count in the current contest.

I'm out. Tweet at your boy or send a good old fashioned email my way.

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<![CDATA[Your Weekend To Do List]]>

FRIDAY 22

EATS: GREATER CINCINNATI RESTAURANT WEEK

Be a culinary tourist in your own city with CityBeat’s inaugural Greater Cincinnati Restaurant Week. Do you like eating? Do you want to try some multi-course meals for cheap? Restaurants throughout the Tristate will be offering $35 three-course meals to delight the palate and impress your date. Participating eateries include Harvest Bistro & Wine Bar, Pompilios, Kaze, The Palace, Parkers Blue Ash Tavern and more. Check out menus and more info online. Through April 24. $35 plus tax and gratuities. Find participating restaurants at greatercincinnatirestaurantweek.com

ONSTAGE: DISNEY’S BEAUTY & THE BEAST
The story of Belle, a smart young woman, and her romance with a Beast (a handsome prince under a spell) is a “tale as old as time,” but its tour stop in Cincinnati is short — only five days. Kids will enjoy this one, but the special effects are fun for everyone, especially the dancing dishes and furniture. Based on Disney’s Academy Award-winning animated film, the stage adaptation has been a Broadway hit since 1994 (it’s the ninth longest-running musical in history). This production has toured all 50 states, performing more than 1,500 times. By now, they’ve got the magic down pat. Through Sunday. $29-$107. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-621-2787, cincinnatiarts.org

Jay Bolotin
Photo: Rachel Heberling
ONSTAGE: PRESENT TENSE IMPERFECT
As part of the ongoing celebration of the Weston Art Gallery’s 20th anniversary, the gallery is offering Present Tense Imperfect, a performance series of spoken word, music and film held in the Aronoff Center’s Fifth Third Bank Theater. Artists include Jay Bolotin, Jack Burton Overdrive, Elese Daniel, Mark Flanigan, Matt Hart, Desirae Hosley and the Teen Poets of WordPlay Cincy Scribes, The IdleAires, Yvette Nepper, Steven Proctor, Kathy Y. Wilson and Terri Ford. Also offered will be excerpts from the late Aralee Strange’s film project The Peach Mountain Psalms (formerly This Train) as a work in progress. 8-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $12 one night; $20 weekend pass. 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cincinnatiarts.org

'Butterflies of the Caribbean'
Photo: Krohn Conservatory
EVENT: EARTH DAY CELEBRATION AT KROHN
Enjoy free-flying butterflies in underwater-themed decor. The first 300 visitors will receive free tree seedling. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $7; $4 children. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, cincinnatiparks.org.

EVENT: CINCINNATI NATURE CENTER EARTH DAY CELEBRATION
The Nature Center is free Friday through Sunday, where you can explore the center’s trails or participate in some planned activities. April 22-24. Free. Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, cincynature.org. 


SATURDAY 23

Earth Day OTR
Photo: 3CDC
EVENTS: EARTH DAY OTR

Celebrate Earth Day at Washington Park. 3CDC has partnered with Keep Cincinnati Beautiful to offer eco-friendly activities for kids and adults, like the opportunity to climb an inflatable rock wall, join a recycling drive and listen to live music all day from bands including Elementree Livity Project. Eli’s BBQ will serve up classic barbecue and vegetarian sides, and several environmentally conscious vendors will be setting up in the park to offer unique goods. Noon-7 p.m. Saturday. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org

Lebanon BrewHAHa
Photo: Provided
EVENT: LEBANON BREWHAHA

Frauen and herren are invited to break out their lederhosen and dust off their beer steins (or wear their normal attire) for the second-annual Lebanon BrewHAHa. Educate yourself about craft beer and expand your palate, whether you’re a beer aficionado or novice; represented breweries include Fifty West, Warped Wing, Moerlein, MadTree, Mt. Carmel, Rhinegeist and more. There will also be live music and entertainment, plus food trucks. Families be warned: no kinder allowed; this party is 21 and up. 5-10 p.m. Saturday; 4 p.m. VIP. $40-$55; $10 designated drivers. Warren Country Fairgrounds, 655 North Broadway, Lebanon, lebanonbrewhaha.com.  

Photo: Provided by Leah Stone
EVENT: SECOND TIME AROUND ADULT PROM
Want to relive the excitement of prom without the teenaged awkwardness? The Second Time Around Adult Prom lets you do exactly that while living out the star-studded theme of a Hollywood awards show. Hosted at the Contemporary Arts Center, the event stays true to the essentials of prom — food, a DJ, dancing until your feet hurt — along with additional surprises and booze (which we definitely didn’t drink in high school). Raise a glass to the past and dance all night long, with entertainment provided by multiple DJs and local R&B, Soul and Hip Hop group Deuces Musik. 9 p.m.-2 a.m.; 8:30 p.m. doors Saturday. $55; $85 VIP. Contemporary Arts Center, 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown, adultpromcincy.com.

EVENT: WORLD CULTURE FEST
Take a trip around the world within the walls of the historic Cincinnati Museum Center during Saturday’s World Culture Fest. Performers and presenters celebrate cultures around the globe by showcasing some of the most unique and traditional practices from Asia, Africa, South America and Europe. The event also explores the extensive history of immigration in Cincinnati through music, dance and education. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Free in the rotunda. Cincinnati Museum Center, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, cincymuseum.org

Kiefer Sutherland
Photo: Beth Elliott
MUSIC: KIEFER SUTHERLAND
Kiefer Sutherland is, of course, best known as the star of numerous films and the TV show 24. But music has also long been a part of Sutherland’s life. He and singer/songwriter Jude Cole created the Ironworks label/studio to support independent artists, releasing albums by Rocco DeLuca & the Burden, Ron Sexsmith and Lifehouse. Sutherland also wrote some songs to shop around to other artists, but Cole convinced him he should make his own album, resulting in the Americana/Country-flavored Down in a Hole, which is due this summer. While actors-turned-musicians are often viewed cynically, Sutherland has been receiving glowing reviews so far on his tour (after a recent gig in Milwaukee, digital magazine OnMilwaukee ran a rave review with the headline, “Guys, the Kiefer Sutherland Concert Last Night Was Actually Pretty Good”). 10 p.m. Saturday. $20; $25 day of show. Taft Theatre Ballroom, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org

EVENT: SPRING FEST IN THE WOODS
Celebrate spring with wild edible cooking demos, crafts, vendors, live animals and more. Also features live music and face painting, plus education bout Ohio’s native plants, wildflowers and habitat registration. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Trailside Nature Center, Burnet Woods, 3400 Brookline Drive, Clifton, 513-861-3435. 

SPORTS: DOGWOOD DASH
The annual scenic springtime 5K run/walk takes you through the Boone County Arboretum. 9 a.m. $22-$32 registration. 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Ky., bcarboretum.org. 

MUSIC: WOODYFEST
For the past several years, Cincinnati Folk singer Jake Speed has headlined a tribute to American music icon Woody Guthrie. Speed and WoodyFest return Saturday for the annual celebration at Mount Saint Joseph University’s Recital Hall (5701 Delhi Road, Delhi). Joining Speed for the 7 p.m. performance are local Folk/Americana faves Buffalo Wabs and the Price Hill Hustle. Admission is $10 at the door (the event is free for Mount Saint Joseph students with ID).

SUNDAY 24
Jon Snow is dead. Or is he? (Yes. He’s dead.)
Photo: Courtesy of HBO
TV: GAME OF THRONES 
So you want to talk about Game of Thrones? Would you like spoilers with that? Whether you read every book, interview and fan theory before each season or you have the Spoiler Shield app installed to prevent seeing even the most innocuous set photos, fans can’t help but speculate about what’s coming next, especially after the season finale last year (spoiler alert). Stannis was cornered by Brienne, Theon and Sansa jumped off a castle wall, Arya was punished for misusing her gift, Daenerys found herself alone (with a Dothraki horde), the brothers finally turned on Jon Snow — and that’s just a glimpse at all the action. Of course, that final development is what’s on the forefront of everyone’s minds going into Season 6: What is going to happen to Jon? The show’s storyline has now moved past the books — last season covered events in the fifth book in George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series; Martin is still working on the sixth. That means for the first time all viewers are pretty much in the dark about what’s to come. (Everyone, of course, except President Obama, who famously requested and received advanced access.) But HBO’s press release describing the episode doesn’t mince words — there are just four: Jon Snow is dead. Now, this is a universe where people shape-shift, raise dragons and create Frankensteinian zombie warriors. Anything is possible. Or maybe we’re all in denial. And because everybody’s doing it, there will now be a Game of Thrones after-show. After the Thrones (real original), hosted by podcasters Andy Greenwald and Chris Ryan, will be available every Monday following new episodes on HBO GO, NOW and On Demand. Season 6 Premiere, 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO.

Photo: Dame Darcy
EVENT: THE DARCY AND LISA SHOW WITH THE KUZAK SISTERS
Sequential artist and illustrator Dame Darcy and writer Lisa Crystal Carver (aka Lisa Suckdog) will be performing raucous scenes from their collaborative new book The Jaywalker on Sunday evening at the Ice Cream Factory. In the brutal spectacle tradition of Carver’s underground band Suckdog (Darcy was also a member), the performers, together with sisters Maddie and Genevieve Kuzak, will embody the archetypal characters of the Dead Mother, the Revolutionary Daughter, the Dish on the Side and the Man, engaging audiences in an action-packed, funny and disturbing performance. All ages. 8 p.m. $5. The Ice Cream Factory, 2133 Central Ave., Brighton, thedarcylisashow.com.

EVENT: MAINSTRASSE BAZAAR
The weather calls for sun, shopping and a load of vintage items on Sunday when MainStrasse Village comes to life during the monthly Village Bazaar (every fourth Sunday through October). Peruse the Sixth Street Promenade for furniture, home goods, decor, architectural elements, tools, jewelry, clothing, gadgets, collectibles and more. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. Free. Sixth Street, Covington, Ky., mainstrasse.org

Photo: Cassandre Crawford
ATTRACTION: ZOO BLOOMS
While the Cincinnati Zoo is known for its diverse collection of animals, it’s also home to one of Ohio’s two accredited botanical gardens. Now is the time to catch the garden at its finest with Zoo Blooms, a display of more than one million tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, flowering trees and shrubs blooming throughout the park. Although these flowers don’t sing like those in Alice in Wonderland, the accompanying Tunes & Blooms series allows guests to check out the fantastic florals after hours with live music from some of Cincinnati’s favorite bands on Thursday evenings; concerts start April 7 with Honey & Houston and Buffalo Wabs & the Price Hill Hustle. Zoo Blooms on display through April. Free with admission; $13-$27. Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale, cincinnatizoo.org

EVENT: GOODWILL EARTH DAY ELECTRONIC RECYCLING
Drop off unwanted computers, keyboards, mouse systems, monitors and other electronic equipment. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. All 31 Goodwill Donation Centers, cincinnatigoodwill.org/donate.


Find more things to do here.









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<![CDATA[CityBeat Wins National Reporting Award]]> The Society of Professional Journalists announced the winners of its national Sigma Delta Chi awards today, and CityBeat is among the publications receiving recognition. 

Nick Swartsell’s August 26, 2015 cover story, “That Which Divides Us,” won in the Public Service category for non-daily publications.

That story explored economic segregation in Cincinnati and has helped foster an ongoing conversation around race and economic issues here.

Amid controversy around police shootings of unarmed African Americans and subsequent civil unrest in cities like Baltimore and Chicago, Swartsell delved into the persistent socioeconomic factors that feed into America’s deep problems with race. The site of profound civil unrest in 2001 over the police shooting of Timothy Thomas, Cincinnati is, unfortunately, a prime place in which to examine these tensions. 

Swartsell analyzed 2010 Census and 2011-2014 American Community Survey data on a neighborhood level, even down to the Census tract in some cases, to present a picture of a city starkly segregated by class and race, where tensions bubble up from the deep crevices of inequality separating blacks and whites. The article also incorporated overall median income statistics, infant mortality rates and other data illustrating the negative impacts of economic segregation in a city where the nine lowest-income neighborhoods are predominantly African American and the nine highest-income are predominantly, in many cases more than 90 percent, white.

“That Which Divides Us” traced the history of economic segregation in Cincinnati and comparable cities across the country, exploring federal policies, inaction by city officials and other factors to explain why so many African Americans in Cincinnati grow up and remain in a cycle of poverty, cordoned off in crumbling and over-policed neighborhoods or caught up in the justice system’s revolving doors.

Finally, the article traced signs of hope — new efforts by activists and officials to bring economic opportunities to a city that the Brookings Institute recently ranked 81st in the nation in terms of racially inclusive economic prosperity.

The story was also recognized by national long-form journalism site Longreads.com, which named it a top pick last year.

The Sigma Delta Chi awards highlight the best professional journalism from publications around the country. News outlets including the Associated Press, The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times are among the 84 Sigma Delta Chi award winners in various newspaper, magazine, television and radio categories chosen from almost 1,500 entries this year.

The award, established in 1932, is named for the original moniker of the SPJ. The 107-year-old organization is the oldest and one of the largest in the United States representing professional journalists.

This is CityBeat’s first time winning the award. The complete list of winners can be found here
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<![CDATA[Lonnie Mack 1941-2016]]>

Yesterday marked the passing of not only Prince, but another music legend — Lonnie Mack. Mack, who was born in Harrison, Ind., and cut his teeth in Greater Cincinnati’s nightclubs, died Thursday at his home in Tennessee from natural causes. The influential guitarist was 74. 

Recording locally and releasing early material on Cincinnati’s Fraternity label, Mack’s guitar playing is said to have been a major influence on many Rock superstar players, including Keith Richards, Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughn. The pioneering guitarist was the second artist to receive the Michael W. Bany Lifetime Achievement Award from the Enquirer’s former awards program, the Cammys, accepting the award in 1998. Bootsy Collins, who won the award the year before, has said Mack was a giant influence on the development of his style. 

Mack is considered one of Rock & Roll’s first “guitar heroes.” He’s in the Rockabilly Hall of Fame and the International Guitar Hall of Fame, and should be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. 

Here’s the press release sent out by Alligator Records (Mack’s final label) late last night:

Groundbreaking guitarist and vocalist Lonnie Mack, known as one of rock’s first true guitar heroes, died on April 21, 2016 of natural causes at Centennial Medical Center near his home in Smithville, Tennessee. His early instrumental recordings – among them Wham! and Memphis -- influenced many of rock's greatest players, including Eric Clapton, Duane Allman, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page and especially Stevie Ray Vaughan. He was 74.

Rolling Stone called him “a pioneer in rock guitar soloing.” Guitar World said, “Mack attacked the strings with fast, aggressive single-string phrasing and a seamless rhythm style that significantly raised the guitar virtuoso bar and foreshadowed the arena-sized tones of guitar heroes to come.” The Chicago Tribune wrote, “With the wiggle of a whammy bar and a blinding run of notes up and down the neck of his classic Gibson Flying V, Lonnie Mack launched the modern guitar era.”

Drawing from influences as diverse as rhythm and blues, country, gospel and rockabilly, Mack’s guitar work continues to be revered by generation after generation of musicians. He recorded a number of singles and a total of 11 albums for labels including Fraternity, Elektra, Alligator, Epic and Capitol.

Mack was born Lonnie McIntosh on July 18, 1941 in Harrison, Indiana, twenty miles west of Cincinnati. Growing up in rural Indiana, Mack fell in love with music as a child. From family sing-alongs he developed a deep appreciation of country music, while he absorbed rhythm and blues from the late-night R&B radio stations and gospel from his local church. Starting off with a few chords that he learned from his mother, Lonnie gradually blended all the sounds he heard around him into his own individual style. He named Merle Travis and Robert Ward (of the Ohio Untouchables) as his main guitar influences, and George Jones and Bobby Bland as vocal inspirations.

He began playing professionally in his early teens (he quit school after a fight with his sixth-grade teacher), working clubs and roadhouses around the tri-state border area of Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio. In 1958, he bought the guitar he would become best known for, a Gibson Flying V, serial number 7, which he equipped with a Bigsby tremolo bar. (After the release of Wham!, the tremolo bar became known worldwide as a “whammy bar”.) In addition to his live gigs, Lonnie began playing sessions for the King and Fraternity labels in Cincinnati. He recorded with blues and R&B greats like Hank Ballard, Freddie King and James Brown.

In 1963, at the end of another artist's session, Lonnie cut an instrumental version of Chuck Berry's Memphis. He didn't even know that Fraternity had issued the single until he heard it on the radio, and within a few weeks Memphis had hit the national Top Five. Lonnie Mack went from being a talented regional roadhouse player to a national star virtually overnight.

Suddenly, he was booked for hundreds of gigs a year, crisscrossing the country in his Cadillac and rushing back to Cincinnati or Nashville to cut new singles. Wham!, Where There's A Will There's A Way, Chicken Pickin' and a dozen other ecords followed Memphis. None sold as well as his first hit (though Where There's A Will earned extensive black radio airplay before the DJs found out Lonnie was white), but there was enough reaction to keep him on the road for another five years of grueling one-nighters.

Fraternity Records went bust, but Lonnie kept on gigging, and in 1968 a Rolling Stone article stimulated new interest in his music. He signed with Elektra Records and cut three albums. Elektra also reissued his original Fraternity LP, The Wham Of That Memphis Man!. He began playing all the major rock venues, from Fillmore East to Fillmore West. Lonnie also made a guest appearance on the Doors' Morrison Hotel album. You can hear Lonnie's guitar solo on Roadhouse Blues preceded by Jim Morrison's urgent 'Do it, Lonnie! Do it!' He even worked in Elektra's A&R department. When the label merged with giant Warner Brothers, Lonnie grew disgusted with the new bureaucracy and walked out of his job.

Mack headed back to rural Indiana, playing back-country bars, going fishing and laying low. After six years of relative obscurity, Lonnie signed with Capitol and cut two albums that featured his country influences. He played on the West Coast for a while and even flew to Japan for a “Save The Whales” benefit. Then he headed to New York to team up with an old friend named Ed Labunski. Labunski was a wealthy jingle writer that wrote "This Bud's For You" who was tired of commercials and wanted to write and play for pleasure. He and Lonnie built a studio in rural Pennsylvania and spent three years organizing and recording a country-rock band called South, which included Buffalo-based keyboardist Stan Szelest, who later played on Lonnie's Alligator debut. Ed and Lonnie had big plans for their partnership, including producing an album by a then-obscure Texas guitarist named Stevie Ray Vaughan. But the plans evaporated when Labunski died in an auto accident, and the South album was never commercially released. Lonnie next headed for Canada and joined the band of veteran rocker Ronnie Hawkins for a summer. After a brief stay in Florida, he returned to Indiana in 1982, playing clubs in Cincinnati and the surrounding area.

Mack began his re-emergence on the national scene in November of 1983. At Stevie Ray Vaughan's urging, he relocated from southern Indiana to Texas, where he settled in Spicewood. He began jamming with Stevie Ray (who proudly named Wham! as the first single he owned) in local clubs and flying to New York for gigs at the Lone Star and the Ritz. When Alligator Records approached Lonnie to do an album, Vaughan immediately volunteered to help him out. The result was 1985’s Strike Like Lightning, co-produced by Lonnie and Stevie Ray and featuring Stevie's guitar on several tracks.

Mack’s re-emergence was a major music industry event. Keith Richards, Ron Wood, Ry Cooder and Stevie Ray Vaughan all joined Lonnie on stage during his 1985 tour. The New York Times said, “Although Mr. Mack can play every finger-twisting blues guitar lick, he doesn't show off; he comes up with sustained melodies and uses fast licks only at an emotional peak. Mr. Mack is also a thoroughly convincing singer.”  Other celebrities -- Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, Paul Simon, Eddie Van Halen, Dwight Yoakam and actor Matt Dillon -- attended shows during the Strike Like Lightning tour. The year was capped off with a stellar performance at New York's prestigious Carnegie Hall with Albert Collins and the late Roy Buchanan. That show was released commercially on DVD as Further On Down The Road.

Mack recorded two more albums for Alligator, 1986’s Second Sight and 1990’s Live! Attack Of the Killer V. In between he signed with Epic Records and released Roadhouses And Dancehalls in 1988. Mack continued to tour into the 2000s. He relocated to Smithville, Tennessee where he continued writing songs but ceased active touring. In 2001 he was inducted into the International Guitar Hall Of Fame and in 2005 into the Rockabilly Hall Of Fame.

He is survived by five children and multitudes of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral arrangements are pending.


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<![CDATA[Stage Door]]>

You have more theater choices this weekend than time, I suspect, so choose carefully depending on the kind of show you most enjoy.

If it’s a classic, I suggest you check out Julius Caesar at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. This tale of one of history’s most memorable political assassinations is one of Shakespeare’s shorter plays, about two hours and 15 minutes. But it’s action-packed with a lot of intrigue, soul-searching and emotions that ebb and flow. Cincy Shakes relies on its acting ensemble to fill these iconic roles, and they bring them to life more vividly than I’ve seen in a long time. Josh Katawick is especially engaging as the leader, “lean and hungry” Cassius, whose motives are not far below his ambitious surface; Brent Vimtrup is Brutus, caught up in the plot for reasons of principle rather than envy, and his subtle performance of this conflicted man is compelling. Veteran Nick Rose is the blustery soldier Marc Antony, who’s actually a subtle manipulator of opinion. (We’ll see more of him next month when Cincy Shakes move on to Shakespeare’s other Roman play, Antony and Cleopatra). Through May 7. Tickets: 513-381-2273.

An engaging new play, Lauren Gunderson’s Silent Sky, is onstage at Know Theatre, the story of Henrietta Leavitt, a woman of science from a century ago when women were not expected to have meaningful insights. But drawn to the mysteries of astronomy, she tirelessly made advances despite many barriers. Maggie Lou Rader plays the feisty woman, and her moral support from two older women, played by Annie Fitzpatrick and Regina Pugh, has elements of humor. This is a well-acted, well-staged play (direction by Know’s Tamara Winters), worth seeing. I gave it a Critic’s Pick with my CityBeat review. Through May 14. Tickets: 513-300-5669.

The 2014 movie of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Into the Woods featured Meryl Streep, Anna Kendrick, Emily Blunt, James Corden and Johnny Depp. A production currently onstage at Northern Kentucky University doesn’t have that kind of star power, but the student cast does an admirable job with a show that places extraordinary vocal demands on singers. Director Jamey Strawn hit upon an imaginative framing device for the legendary fairy tale mash-up, setting it in a library where a young boy (played with a mischievously expressive demeanor by Charlie Klesa, a sixth-grader at Mercy Montessori), hides away for an overnight adventure of reading and fantasizing. As giants threaten the kingdom, books tumble from the library’s two-story-tall shelves. Into the Woods requires a big cast, and more than 20 NKU student actors plus a stylized wooden cow are clearly committed to giving their all to this production. Opening night on Thursday was an enthusiastic full house. Through May 1. Tickets: 859-572-5464.

Neil LaBute’s plays traffic in complex, often ironic, manipulative situations, frequently brutal stories of abusive, selfish behavior. The Shape of Things, presented by New Edgecliff Theatre at Hoffner Lodge in Northside, is that kind of story — about Evelyn, an ambitious young woman who makes an art project of Adam, another student who thinks their relationship is a love affair. Rebecca Whatley and Matthew Krieg handle these complicated roles believably, but you’ll walk away wondering about their motives — she’s cold, he’s clueless. It’s a compelling, disturbing story that makes for an evening of edgy, psychological theater. Another Critic’s Pick with my CityBeat review. Through April 30. Tickets here.

There’s a touring production of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast onstage at the Aronoff Center through Sunday. It’s an entertaining, visually captivating production. There’s nothing new about it, to be sure, but the young cast carries off the sprightly songs and choreography with lots of energy. I wish there was a little more heart and a little less clowning, especially by Sam Hartley as the Beast, who’s meant to be a tragic hero. The chemistry between him and Brooke Quintana as Belle is in the script, but it only shows up intermittently onstage. Nevertheless, Wednesday night’s full house with lots of kids dressed for the evening clearly had a good time watching the story unfold. Through Sunday. Tickets: 513-621-2787.

Quick Notes: True Theater is back for another quarterly evening of storytelling on Monday evening at 7:30 p.m. Know Theatre. This time the theme is True Gay, so it will be enlightening to hear the personal reminiscences that get shared. … At UC’s College-Conservatory of Music this weekend, the drama program presents a staged reading of Grace Gardner’s new script, Very Dumb Kids, tonight 8 p.m. and Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m. It’s the beginning of a new play commissioning initiative that will foster new works. … This is the final weekend for David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross at the Incline Theater in East Price Hill and for Jason Robert Brown’s musical, The Last Five Years, at The Carnegie in Covington.


Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

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<![CDATA[Morning News and Stuff]]>

Good morning all. Or, well, let's be honest with ourselves: This is a not good morning. Prince is dead. The Reds lost yesterday in what appears to be the highest-scoring no-hitter since the 1880s. There’s some rain in the forecast today. Ouch.

Anyway, here’s the rest of the news if you can bear it.

• Hey, here’s something positive. The population of Cincinnati’s urban core — Over-the-Rhine, downtown, Pendleton and the East End — has increased, according to a new report from Downtown Cincinnati Inc. The Business Courier has the details on that study, but the upshot is that about 400 more people lived in the city’s 45202 ZIP code last year than did in 2014, and the population there is now almost 16,000. There are certainly downsides to this growth, as we explore in this week’s news feature. But the uptick in population signals the continued reversal in a historic trend that saw people leaving the urban core for decades.

• Contenders in the upcoming Hamilton County Commissioners race — Democrat State Rep. Denise Driehaus and Republican incumbent Dennis Deters (that’s a lot of Ds) — just released their post-primary fundraising totals. Driehaus brought in $64,000 for the fundraising period, bringing her total take so far up to $308,000, according to her campaign. The campaign says that 65 percent of that take came from donors pledging $100 or less. Deters meanwhile, has raised about $92,000 so far, according to WCPO, but most of that has come since the new year. Many expect the race to be one of the most expensive ever, with Driehaus saying she hopes to raise $1 million before all is said and done. Control of the currently Republican-led county commission hangs in the balance with the unusually competitive race.

• Republic Street in Over-the-Rhine won’t be getting a rooftop deck bar, a city board ruled yesterday. The Lang Thang Group, which runs neighborhood restaurants Quan Hapa and Pho Lang Thang, wanted to build the deck as part of its planned Crown & Key bar at 1332 Republic St. Residents there didn’t oppose the bar, but did take issue with the deck, which they feared would cause unwelcome noise and other detriments to quality of life in the neighborhood. A residents group that pushed back against the deck also cited ways in which the plan violated historic conservation guidelines in the neighborhood. The city’s Zoning Board of Appeals agreed with residents. The Lang Thang Group can challenge that decision in the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas if it chooses.

• Cincinnati Public Schools will remake seven of its neighborhood schools next year. The remakes are part one of a larger plan called Vision 2020 to make CPS more attractive by adding additional programs to schools. Next year, schools like Chase School in Northside will get expanded arts and culture offerings, while others like Rothenberg Academy in Over-the-Rhine will get student entrepreneurship classes.

• Finally, as the GOP presidential primary continues to get weirder and more chaotic, national media is looking more at Ohio Gov. John Kasich to… well, I guess try to figure out what he’s thinking. Kasich trails primary frontrunner Donald Trump and second-placer U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz badly in the race’s delegate count, and there's no mathematical way for him to win the nomination aside from a contested convention. Party leaders and pundits have been pushing for Kasich to leave the race for months. But he’s still going, and that’s newsworthy, I suppose. Earlier this week, Kasich met with the editorial board of the Washington Post for an extended interview, where he laid out his reasons for staying in the race. I’ll leave you with a key quote from Kasich.

“The last poll that we saw up there I was running five points behind Hillary. Five. Trump was getting slaughtered. I mean, you guys have been watching and girl- women here have been watching the national polls. I win in the fall every time, even in that electoral deal, and Trump gets slaughtered.”

Mark this as the moment you learned that girl-women will help Kasich win that electoral deal. Send your thoughts on that knowledge-nugget, or your news tips, via e-mail or Twitter. I'm out.

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<![CDATA[Go Green]]>

APRIL 21

Zoo Blooms — The zoo transforms into an explosion of color with one of the largest tulip displays in the Midwest. Through April 30. Free with zoo admission. $18 adult; $13 child/senior. Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale, cincinnatizoo.org 

Butterflies of the Caribbean — Beautiful, live butterflies coast around Krohn Conservatory among displays of Caribbean culture. Floral displays abound, inspired by the colors of the Caribbean sunset. Through June 19. $7; $4 children; $12 unlimited admission pin. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, cincinnatiparks.com  

Party for the Planet: An Earth Day Celebration — The greenest zoo in America celebrates Earth Day with their seventh-annual Party for the Planet. Businesses and organizations from around the region will be on hand to share their expertise about living more sustainably. Includes music from the Tunes & Blooms series and a rain barrel benefit auction. 4-8:30 p.m. Free admission after 5 p.m.; $10 parking. Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale, cincinnatizoo.org.

Discover Herbs and More — The Northern Kentucky Herb Society discusses uses for fresh herbs, from cooking to household tips. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Burlington, Ky., 859-342-2665, nkyherb.com. 

Full Moon Walk — Hit the trails at night and enjoy a full moon viewing and natural history readings. 8:30 p.m. $5 members; $10 non-members. Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, cincynature.org.   

APRIL 22
Earth Day Celebration at Krohn — Enjoy free-flying butterflies in underwater-themed decor. The first 300 visitors will receive free tree seedling. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $7; $4 children. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, cincinnatiparks.org.

EmpowerU Earth Day Lecture: Where Did We Go Wrong? — Bring adult beverages and lawn chairs and dress in your best Earth Day costume. EmpowerU Ohio takes a candid look at Earth Day issues. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. HWB Scout House and Outdoor Pavilion, 34 Village Square, Glendale, 513-478-6261, empoweruohio.org.

Cincinnati Nature Center Earth Day Celebration — The Nature Center is free Friday through Sunday, where you can explore the center’s trails or participate in some planned activities. April 22-24. Free. Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, cincynature.org. 

Native Plant Sale — Choose from a large selection of locally grown native plants, including nectar plants for butterflies, edibles for birds and trees and shrubs. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Through June 30. Prices vary. Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, cincynature.org.

University of Cincinnati Re*Use Market — The Market accepts furniture, household goods, non-perishable food items, electronics, books, clothing, sporting goods, toys and more. Anyone can come take the donated items for free; at the end of the week, remaining items will be donated to local charities. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily April 22-May 3. Free. Old YMCA, 270 Calhoun St., Clifton Heights, 513-556-3844, uc.edu.

Trees in Trouble Screening — CET Channel 48 broadcasts locally made documentary Trees in Trouble, about America’s urban forests. 4:30 p.m. Free. Channel 48, treesintrouble.com.

APRIL 23

Earth Day OTR — 3CDC and Keep Cincinnati Beautiful host a fun-filled day of eco-friendly activities and vendors on the park’s Civic Lawn. Noon-7 p.m. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org.

Evening Gardens — Learn how to convert a corner of a garden into an oasis of tranquility and peace. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. H.J. Benken Florist, 6000 Plainfield Road, Silverton, benkens.com.

GreenUP Day at California Woods — Assist the Cincinnati Parks staff in a clean-up day, where you help remove invasive plants, maintain trail and more. 9 a.m.-noon. Free. California Woods Nature Preserve, 5400 Kellogg Ave., California, cincinnatiparks.com.

Dogwood Dash — The annual scenic springtime 5K run/walk takes you through the Boone County Arboretum. 9 a.m. $22-$32 registration. 9190 Camp Ernst Road, Union, Ky., bcarboretum.org.

Spring Fest in the Woods — Celebrate spring with wild edible cooking demos, crafts, vendors, live animals and more. Also features live music and face painting, plus education bout Ohio’s native plants, wildflowers and habitat registration. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Trailside Nature Center, Burnet Woods, 3400 Brookline Drive, Clifton, 513-861-3435. 

Bird Walk — Beginners are welcome for this casual bird-watching walk. 8 a.m. Free with admission; $9 adults; $6 seniors; $4 children. Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, cincynature.org.

Wildflower Walk — A member of the Cincinnati Wildflower Society hosts a 90-minute guided hike of Nature Center trails. 9:30 a.m. Free with admission; $9 adults; $6 seniors; $4 children. Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, cincynature.org.

APRIL 24
Third Annual Goodwill Earth Day Electronic Recycling Celebration — Drop off unwanted computers, keyboards, mouse systems, monitors and other electronic equipment. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. All 31 Goodwill Donation Centers, cincinnatigoodwill.org/donate.

APRIL 25
Great Parks Listening Session — The community is encouraged to bring thoughts, ideas and questions about Great Parks of Hamilton County. 6-8:30 p.m. April 25. Free. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, greatparks.org. 6-8:30 p.m. April 27. Free. Blue Ash Recreation Center, 4433 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, greatparks.org.

APRIL 26
Workout on the Green — Free fitness classes outdoors in Washington Park every Tuesday and Wednesday. Classes start at 6 and 7:15 p.m. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org.

APRIL 27
Family-Friendly Intro to Spring Edible Plants — Learn which wild spring plants are edible. The program also touches on ethnical harvesting practices, common poisonous plants and recipes which feature the plants. Bring a peeler, knife and cutting board. 10 a.m.-noon and 2-4 p.m. $5. Long Branch Farm & Trails, Creekside Barn, 6926 Gaynor Road, Goshen, cincynature.org.

APRIL 29
The Environment as Muse: Artists and Nature — This symposium features four artists whose work is a tribute to the kinship of art and nature. Panelists include author Rick Bass, English professor Donelle Dreese and NKU’s professor of art Kevin Muente. 6:45-8 p.m. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, cincinnatiartmuseum.org.

APRIL 30
Party in the Woods — Cincinnati’s premiere party in the woods! Meteorologist Steve Raleigh emcee’s an evening of food, artwork and auctions. All proceeds benefit the Cincinnati Nature Center’s programs to connect children to nature. 6 p.m. $165 per person. Cincinnati Nature Center, 4949 Tealtown Road, Milford, cincynature.org.

MAY 01
Flying Pig Marathon The 18th-annual Flying Pig Marathon flies along the streets of downtown Cincinnati, Covington, Newport, Mariemont, Fairfax and Columbia Township. The race starts at 6:30 a.m. for runners, walkers, trotters, etc. 6 a.m.-3 p.m. $100-$120, flyingpigmarathon.com 

MAY 03
Get the Dirt on Backyard CompostingAn hour-long seminar on the basics of backyard composting. 7 p.m. Knox Presbyterian Church, 3400 Michigan Ave., Hyde Park, hamiltoncountyrecycles.org 

MAY 04
Barrows Conservation Lecture Series Dr. Joy Reidenberg’s lecture is “Why Whales are Weird, Wacky and Wonderful.” Explore the anatomy, evolution and adaptation of whales. 7 p.m. $14; $12 members. Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale, cincinnatizoo.org.

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<![CDATA[Morning News & Stuff]]> Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s unlikely road to the GOP presidential nomination took yet another hit in New York on Tuesday. While Kasich topped Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, finishing second, his 25 percent only yielded four delegates. Frontrunner Donald Trump took just over 60 percent of the votes, for 89.

Back in Ohio, the Democratic Party is running ads bashing Kasich for wasting taxpayer money traveling across the country to be part of the GOP primary show. State Dems say Kasich has spent 177 days outside Ohio and that his campaign has cost $350,000 of public funding.

Politifact looked into the data and suggests that number could be more like $400,000.

State funds from the public safety department’s non-highway program, which includes the governor’s security detail, is likely paying for rental cars, hotel rooms, flights, fuel, per diems and overtime while Kasich criss-crosses the country chasing delegates.

But the Dispatch story describes how cagey state agencies are being with these specifics. Information that was public in the years before Kasich’s run is now shielded. On payroll records, the governor’s detail was previously listed as the "executive protection unit." Officials told the Dispatch that that designation that has been dropped to shield the troopers’ identities.

• Behind this relatively callous headline is the story of a local community with so little money it can’t pay its bill for Hamilton County Sheriff’s deputies to patrol. Lincoln Heights might have to disband, though nearby communities aren’t going to be super excited to absorb the village because of its financial troubles.

• The era of “Big Weed” is fast approaching, as private entities salivate over the revenue numbers coming out of places that have some sort of legal pot. Some are concerned that profiteers might put their own interests ahead of the public’s — marijuana is typically being legalized for medicinal purposes before recreational — and some say there’s reason to think marijuana opponents are helping open the door for the bad people to take over the industry.

• Andrew Jackson doesn’t have a very good reputation among people who recognized United States’ imperialistic and genocidal history, particularly his large part in it. America’s seventh president yesterday was booted from the front of the $20 bill, replaced by abolitionist Harriet Tubman. Jackson will still appear on the back of the note, along with an image of the White House.

Here’s how some racists are reacting to the news.

• England is warning tourists about the discrimination LGBT people could face if they visit America’s grand state of North Carolina.

• Speaking of discrimination against gay people in the 21st century after the Supreme Court has legalized gay marriage, Kim Davis still wants her religious freedom to allow her to impose her beliefs on other people. A federal appeals court won’t take her lawsuit, however, dismissing her argument that she shouldn’t have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

• The news is apparently full of bigots and homophobes taking L’s today. Former Major League Baseball star Curt Shilling can now add “former” to his title as an analyst for ESPN — he was fired yesterday for the latest in a series of ridiculous comments, social media posts and defenses of offensive memes. Here’s the latest one.

Here’s a little bit about what got Shilling to this point, via Deadspin:

This was far from the first time Schilling crossed a line at ESPN. Two months ago, he said Hillary Clinton “should be buried under a jail somewhere.” Three months ago, Schilling joked about being fired from ESPN for his donation to Ben Carson. Seven months ago, ESPN had nothing to say about Schilling posting insane memes on Facebook. Eight months ago, Schilling tweeted a meme comparing Muslims and Nazis, and was suspended for it. Shortly after that, he emailed a long, strange rant to a blogger to clarify his thoughts about Muslims and Nazis, and was suspended for the rest of the season.

When the easiest way to find information about someone is to google “______ is an asshole,” you know you’ve had quite a big platform to espouse terrible things. Schilling has worked for ESPN off and on since 2010.

• Speaking of sports, the Reds beat the Colorado Rocky Mountains again yesterday, but they don’t know which relief pitcher to trust in the ninth inning going forward because so many have metaphorically set leads on fire during the first couple weeks of the season.

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<![CDATA[Task Force Unveils New Initatives Aimed at Reducing Campus Sexual Assault]]>

A task force created by City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld unveiled new initiatives at a Tuesday press conference aimed at better supporting survivors and educating the community about sexual assault. 

The effort, called the Task Force Reduce Campus Gender-Based Violence, involved eight months of concerned parties working together to come up with ways the city can reduce campus sexual assault and better aid survivors. Participants included the Cincinnati Police Department, University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, Cincinnati Public Schools, local nonprofits, university students and sexual assault survivors.

As chair of Council's Education and Entrepreneurship Committee, Sittenfeld said he saw sexual assault as a disruption to a student's right to education.  

"Last fall, Cincinnati became one of the first and only cities in the country to convene a city wide task force to address reducing gender-based violence, especially on and around our college campuses," Sittenfeld said, "and we've been developing community-specific best practices around awareness and prevention, survivor support, and policies and protocols." 

Kristin Shrimplin is the executive director of nonprofit Women Helping Women and co-chaired the task force. She introduced the city-wide gender-based violence awareness campaign called, "It's On Us, Cincinnati." 

Based off of the national "It's On Us" initiative created by President Barack Obama in 2014, the campaign focuses on educating and engaging the general public about gender-based violence by having people sign a pledge to make a personal commitment to help end sexual assault on campus.  

"This campaign is about energizing and educating the community and surrounding students about what gender-based violence is," Shrimplin said, "how it impacts all of us and how we all have a role in ending it, and supporting those students who have already experience such violence." 

Kate Lawson,  chief Title IX officer for Xavier University, who also co-chaired the task force, said members also developed and launched a one-stop city web portal that will include information for survivors and the community on support services. The portal will also feature videos from task force members dispelling common myths and misconceptions associated with sexual assault. 

Task Force members Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac, Xavier President Michael J. Graham and University of Cincinnati Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Beverly Davenport also spoke at the conference about the importance of the new initiatives and newly established cooperation between community resources. 

In recent years the prevalence of sexual assault on campus has been a growing concern nationwide for universities. 

A 2015 National Sexual Violence Resource Center Report found that one in five college women and one in 16 college men will experience some form of attempted form of sexual assault as a college student. 

Kristen Meyer of Oakley said when she sexually assaulted five years ago just before her sophomore year at Denison University in Granville, Ohio, the university's police department did little to support her. 

"I was told this was happening every weekend on campus, and I was also told that 70 percent of rapes go unreported," said Meyer, who was visibly emotional while recounting the experience. "On top of that, I was told this process would be grueling. That's when I realized this crime is shrouded in silence, and it incriminates the victims rather than the offenders." 

Meyer said the experience led to pushback from her friends and members of the small campus community. She developed severe anxiety and depression from the assault and aftermath and eventually dropped out of school. 

Meyer's speech at the end of the conference was abruptly interrupted when Sittenfeld collapsed about 25 minutes into it. Medics quickly tended to him, and he said later that the incident was caused by overheating and having low-blood sugar. Sittenfeld attended other meetings later in the day.

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<![CDATA[Morning News & Stuff]]>

City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld suffered a scare yesterday when he collapsed during a press conference at City Hall. Medics quickly tended to the councilman and former Senate candidate, who later said he was simply overheated and had low blood sugar.

Sittenfeld said he’ll get the A/C pumped up at City Hall and will be fine.


The incident occurred toward the end of a press conference to announce a new city-wide initiative intended to combat sexual assault on campus.


• On Monday, a group working on recommendations for the city to help combat violent crime announced its findings to a City Council committee.


Spearheaded by City Councilwoman Yvette Simpson, the Violence Prevention Working Group was created in late 2014 when Council cut $400,000 from the city’s Human Services Fund dedicated to violence prevention. The group has been working with neighborhoods and nonprofits to determine effective paths forward.


Participants suggested looking at violent crime as a public health problem and performing a sort of intervention for children who are sometimes being shaped by adults involved in violence.

Working group members from the Cincinnati Health Department, the Cincinnati Police Department and local nonprofit the GLAD House recommended that the city provide $500,000 toward violence prevention to be matched with $250,000 in private funding, appoint a representative from CPD to the Human Services Advisory Council and support the appointment of one organization to serve as the backbone of the plan.

CityBeat covered the announcement in more detail here.


• Walnut Hills High School and Wyoming High School ranked first and second, respectively, in U.S. News and World Report’s latest Ohio high school rankings. Cincinnati in total has five of the top 10 Ohio schools, while Northern Kentucky has four of the top 10 in that state. 


• In bad school news, Miami University suspended two fraternities for hazing. Miami reportedly investigated 21 hazing allegations in February at 12 sororities and fraternities. Bad college kids.  


• Local air quality is pretty bad, but it’s improving according to an annual air quality report by the American Lung Association.


• Cincinnati parking meter revenues are up, which is a common occurrence after raising rates and increasing hours of enforcement. Assistant City Manager John Juech says the city is gleaning a lot of information from the newer smart meters, such as where people park a lot and where they don’t. Revenues are up 60 percent, the city says.


• Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton won their home state primaries in New York yesterday. You don’t have to be a delegate math wizard to realize America is one big step closer to a Clinton-Trump presidential race, but here’s the requisite note from the Washington Post.

Trump’s victory puts him closer to clinching the GOP nomination and should at least temporarily quell speculation that he will fall short of the votes needed before the July convention.


Clinton held a comfortable lead throughout the campaign and her victory makes it near-mathematically impossible for Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.) to overtake her lead in the race for convention delegates.

But is Trump’s jet still registered to fly?


• Vox explains why 4/20 is national weed day. One theory involves high school students getting high every day at 4:20 p.m. and then using 4/20 as a code word. Stoners are extremely creative.


• The Reds played a team with a dumb name from Colorado last night, beating the Mountains 4-3 and stealing five bases in a single inning.

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<![CDATA[Nonprofit Spotlight: May We Help]]>

Patty Kempf was one of May We Help’s first clients before the organization really even existed. She had cerebral palsy and was having trouble turning the pages of the books she loved reading. Bill Wood agreed to help Kempf by designing something that would make reading easier for her. At the same time, Bill Dieseling was doing something similar for a member of his family. The two Bills were connected through a mutual friend and began to work together. Shortly after that they met Bill Sand and the idea for May We Help was born. The Bills began working together harmoniously and May We Help now has hundreds of completed projects and satisfied clients.

The goal of May We Help is to make life easier for people with disabilities. They do this through technology, mechanical engineering, handy work, programming and problem solving. May We Help hopes to free people from their disabilities with these custom creations that will allow them to gain independence and pursue their passions.

The organization designs unique devices for people with disabilities to meet the needs that are not being met by anything else on the market. Clients pitch to the organization what they are looking for, the team researches the idea and if nothing has been developed to meet the need, they accept the project. Beginning with design and then moving into building, the team is focused on the client and what will work for them.

Volunteer:

At May We Help there are 60 volunteers for every one staff member. “They are the heart and soul of our organization,” says Katy Collura, development director. “They truly are the glue that holds everything together.”

There are many different opportunities to get involved with this organization, whether you want to design, build or work behind the scenes. “Our volunteers design and create custom solutions to free individuals with special needs,” Collura says.

Technical volunteers develop the unique devices for clients. Most volunteers in this category are professionals or have a serious interest in product development. These volunteers hear the needs of the client and go from there. This is a very creative opportunity.

There are resource volunteers who build and get to be hands-on with projects. This is a great place to start with May We Help because it is not a leadership position, but it gets into the action of product construction.

A person with a lot of personality makes a great “first impressions” volunteer. In this role, volunteers take charge of the experiences of new volunteers and clients. Their job is to make sure everyone is comfortable, heading to the right place and introduced to the right people during monthly volunteer meetings and monthly work meetings.

Follow-up volunteers make monthly visits to clients who have received their devices. This is a key role because May We Help wants to be sure what they build is working the way it was intended; they don't want to send someone home with a device that isn’t meeting their needs. The follow-up team receives feedback from clients about how their needs are, or aren’t, being met by their device.

May We Help provides meals for around 40 people at all of their monthly meetings. Foodie volunteers are in charge of making sure the people eat. The organization reimburses the cost of food for the meals, but be prepared to cook for what feels like an army.

One of the most important positions is the procurement volunteer. This role was designed to ensure the technical volunteers have the crucial materials they will need throughout the project. Procurement volunteers are responsible for meeting with potential material and service providers to build donor relationships. On the inside they work with the technical volunteers by helping them meet their needs. Sometimes that means contacting other volunteers for advice, checking what is in stock or contacting donors. This position is the bones of the operations and keeps the ball rolling forward.

To become a volunteer, fill out the application online and someone will be in contact soon after. There is no hourly requirement — volunteers can make their own hours. The organization just asks that all projects are done in a timely manner. “In most cases we are the families last resort and they are counting on us to deliver,” Collura says.

Donate:

Monetary donations are crucial to the success of this nonprofit. Because each device is custom to the client, it is hard to know what materials will be needed for the next project. Business owners with available resources to help are encouraged to contact the procurement team about donating services or material.

For more information and access to the volunteer application, visit maywehelp.org.

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<![CDATA[Veteran's Way]]>

Although The MudLarks! have only been playing together in this incarnation for the past six years, the band — which began life as the Go to Hells in 2010 and switched to its current moniker in 2012 — boasts an experiential timeline among its four members that, if viewed consecutively, would stretch back to a pre-Civil War calendar. Now that's entertainment.

The illustrious resumes that the individual MudLarks! — vocalist/guitarist T. Lothar Witt, guitarist/vocalist/keyboardist Jimmy Davidson, bassist/vocalist Bob "Lamb" Lambert, and drummer Max Cole — have accumulated collectively over the past four decades is a core sample of some of Greater Cincinnati's most infamous and well-regarded bands across a broad sonic spectrum, from the glistening Indie Rock of The Libertines (now with the legally appended “US” tagged on) and The Highwaymen, the Punk slash of The Reduced, The Headaches and The Rituals and the experimental howl of 11,000 Switches, Cointelpro and BPA, to the twisted Americana stomp of the Wolverton Brothers and the New Wave bounce of Blanco Nombre and the Babettes. Then there's the long distance listings of The Reducers, Ricky Barnes & the Hoot Owls and probably a few that the quartet has inadvertently or deliberately overlooked due to time, tide, roadburn and hangover. 

And so The MudLarks! — complete with two capital letters in one word and a Hamiltonian exclamation point — have assembled like a grizzled, creaky yet still powerful Transformer of wildly disparate but somehow completely compatible influences to create their singular Indie Punk mash up of local, regional and national music history in 10 tracks and a little over 46 minutes. Not bad for a bunch of guys whose next tour could be sponsored by AARP.

The MudLarks!'s eponymous debut disc, released by New York's Ionik Recordings Company, who also released the latest Wolvertons EP, Liberty Hotel, last year, whipcracks to immediate life with opener "Help Us;" guitars spark and smoulder like vintage Neon Boys/Voidoids while Witt roars with the phlegm-choked outrage of Johnny Rotten in his Pistols-to-PIL transition. It's the perfect launching pad for The MudLarks!'s first studio foray, as the foursome careens madly from the Pere-Ubu-disguised-as-accessible-Indie-Rock-outfit chaos of "Red Window" to the late-'70s-English-Punk-translated-to-downtown-NYC swagger of "Dirty Things" to the irresistible Iggy-Pop-James-Williamson tag-team cage squall of "You Love You."

The MudLarks! are equally adept at slowing down the pace when necessary. "Mea Culpa" drops tempo while maintaining a booted throat intensity and volume, "Losing Track" sounds like a Crazy Horse demo from Danny Whitten's lost heroin weekend sessions and "Love Has the Power" sways and pulses like The Dictators ballad that Handsome Dick Manitoba and his boys never attempted. And the album closes with the majestic "Sunrise," a towering five-and-a-half minute Punk anthem that somehow manages to corral all of the madness preceding it and herd it into a set-ending finale that explodes with the beautiful fury and smoke that typically accompanies a Rozzi fireworks display.


The reason The MudLarks! are able to tap into all these various power sources and not overload the system is not because they're simply familiar with their schematics, it's because they've lived with them so intimately for so long. They understand the nuts and bolts of every genre they've played, separately and together, over the past 40 years and they know perfectly well which parts are interchangeable and will ultimately provide the best performance. Witt and Davidson trade snarling guitar licks like Babe Ruth and Shoeless Joe Jackson playing catch by smashing the ball back and forth to each other from bat to bat, while Lamb and Cole maintain an adaptable rhythm that they can easily shift from slow boulevard cruise to hyperspace warp jump in the blink of a bloodshot eye.

There has been plenty of concrete evidence within our own music scene lately to prove that age does not equal obsolescence — witness the triumphant returns of the Warsaw Falcons and Ass Ponys — and The MudLarks! are yet another sterling example of an assertion that author P.J. O'Rourke made 20 years ago in the title of his 1995 essay collection; Age and Guile Beat Youth, Innocence and a Bad Haircut.

The MudLarks! play a free show at York St. Cafe in Newport Friday with The Tonics

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<![CDATA[Working Group Presents Recommendations for Reducing Violent Crime]]>

A group working to craft recommendations for a long-term strategy for reducing violent crime in the city presented its findings to City Council's Human Services, Youth and Arts Committee on Monday. 

The Violence Prevention Working Group, initiated by City Council, was formed in November 2014 when council removed $400,000 from the Human Services Fund dedicated to violence-prevention work. Creating a group dedicated to finding a holistic approach to breaking the cycle of violent crime, along with additional prevention efforts, was part of that change-up.

The Violence Prevention Working Group was spearheaded by Councilwoman Yvette Simpson, who co-chaired the initiative with Vice Mayor David Mann. Simpson says the city's funding stream dedicated to targeting violent crime had not been following a long-term, comprehensive strategy.  

"The magic of the model as well is that it's not a law enforcement only model, although law enforcement is a part of it and essential to it," Simpson said on Monday. "It's also a health-department focused model and a community-based model."

Four sessions brought together 36 participants from city organizations and community nonprofitssuch as Cincinnati Public Schools, United Way and the Greater Cincinnati Foundationin neighborhoods that have experienced high rates of violent crime. They were held from October of last year to March of this year — two in South Avondale and one each in the West End and Westwood. 

The city has seen a recent increase in violent crime, particularly homicides, which are up 13 percent this year, according to statistics from the Cincinnati Police Department. 

Working group members from the Cincinnati Health Department, the Cincinnati Police Department and local nonprofit the GLAD House recommended that the city provide $500,000 toward violence prevention to be matched with $250,000 in private funding, appoint a representative from CPD to the Human Services Advisory Council and support the appointment of one organization to serve as the backbone of the plan.

The plan's main strategies focus on efforts to engage the entire community and direct services toward early intervention initiatives for at-risk children and their parents. 

Camille Jones, the assistant health commissioner at the Cincinnati Department of Health, presented research that tied youth delinquency behavior to 20 environmental factors. The strongest indicators were child maltreatment, harsh parenting, parental drug use and adolescent substance abuse. 

Jones discussed the concept of looking at violent crime as a public health problem, treating it as if it were a contagious disease that could be passed from person to person, especially when someone is repeatedly exposed to it, such as a child. 

Georgine Gerry, executive director of the RAND House, which provides mental health services to children, agreed there needs to be a community-wide intervention for the city's kids. 

"The focus needs to be on the adults who help shape those youth: the parents, the families and the community members," Getty said. 

Cincinnati Police Department District 4 Captain Maris Herold discussed the department's Place-Based Investigations of Violent Offender Territories, or PIVOT, initiative that it launched in February 

The PIVOT approach focuses on tackling the city's long-standing crime "hot spots" and focuses on carefully monitoring the locations and known offenders' networks through data, rather than increasing police in those particular locations. 

Herold said the hot spots are typically very small areas often amounting to a single address. They account for just 1.4 percent of Cincinnati's area, and increases in law enforcement to those areas actually did more to strain police-community relations with law abiding residents than prevent crime in the long run.

"Ninety-nine percent, probably even higher, of people in a hot spot are just trying to get by and do the right thing,"  Herold says. 

Councilman Wendell Young, who spoke after the group had concluded its presentation, said it is time for the entire community to step up. 

"I see this as the problem I always saw it as, a citywide problem," he said.  

Simpson says the plan will eventually be presented to the full Council.]]>
<![CDATA[Sittenfeld OK After Collapsing During Press Conference]]>

City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld collapsed this morning during a press conference at City Hall. 

Medics arrived quickly to assist the councilman, who was unconscious and reportedly having difficulty breathing at first. Sittenfeld was seen standing, talking and smiling in the third floor conference room where the event was being held within 20 minutes.

Sittenfeld appeared unalarmed when he addressed the various members of the press in the hall about 25 minutes after he fell. It's unclear why he collapsed, but Sittenfeld said he thought he was overheated with low blood sugar.

"We'll make sure the AC is pumped up a little more," he said. 

The incident happened about 25 minutes into a press conference announcing a new city-wide initiative to combat sexual assault on campus. Sittenfeld was holding the event with about 20 members of his Task Force to Reduce Campus Gender-Based Violence, which he created last year.

Sexual assault survivor Kristen Meyer was speaking at the podium when Sittenfeld, who was standing off to her left, suddenly collapsed. The councilman's staff and members of the task force, which included Cincinnati Police Department Chief Elliot Isaac, ushered bystanders out of the room and into the hallway while assisting Sittenfeld. Emergency medical technicians arrived to the closed room about five minutes after, but stayed for only 10 minutes. People leaving the room reported Sittenfeld was OK about 15 minutes after the fall. 

Sittenfeld said he did not plan on seeing a doctor and will continue on with his scheduled day, which includes chairing the Education and Entrepreneurship Committee meeting at 2 p.m.  

Around 11:30 a.m., Sittenfeld announced on Twitter that he is doing fine. 

"Hi everyone, glad to report I'm doing fine. Got over-heated and passed out. Sorry for causing a stir — now everyone get back to work!" 
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<![CDATA[Morning News & Stuff]]> Mayor John Cranley yesterday offered his support for involving the local NAACP in ongoing talks between the University of Cincinnati Police Department and Cincinnati Police Department, but it wasn't necessarily the do-gooder tale it might seem. At least that's how the NAACP sees it.

UCPD has been mired in issues since the shooting death of unarmed black motorist Samuel DuBose by UCPD officer Ray Tensing last year, including revelations that its former chief encouraged officers to increase enforcement within a "no-fly zone" and then mislead investigators after the shooting. Stops increased by 400 percent during the year leading up to the July 19 shooting of DuBose.

Rather than graciously accepting the invitation, however, Cincinnati NAACP President Rob Richardson, Sr. questioned the mayor’s motives, The Enquirer reported yesterday. Richardson, Sr.’s son, Rob Richardson, Jr., is the UC Board of Trustees chairman who some believe could be mulling a mayoral run next year.

Richardson, Sr. says he hasn’t heard from the mayor about many other issues and suggested that Cranley could be playing politics.

In true Cranley fashion, the mayor said that surely is not the case, then offered a well-crafted sound bite that kind of sounds otherwise:

"If the NAACP doesn't think this is important enough to be involved, then that speaks volumes given that his son is the chairman of the UC board," Cranley said. "If the NAACP doesn't want to be involved, that's fine. We can ask the Cincinnati Black United Front and local National Action Network, and the invitation is always open for the NAACP."

• In other clearly non-politically related news, the Historic Conservation Board yesterday rescheduled the vote on whether or not the Joseph Auto Group family will be allowed to demolish the historic Dennison Hotel building on Main Street. 

Joseph’s attorneys had asked for more time to respond to a report issued by Cincinnati Urban Conservator Beth Johnson, who was highly skeptical of their demolition application.

That doesn’t mean Johnson can single-handedly stop it, however.

The conservation board is comprised of seven members, five of whom were recent appointments made on Mayor John Cranley's watch. Among those appointments, made by City Manager Harry Black, is developer Shree Kulkarni. The developer in the past has butted heads with the very board on which he now sits — because, as we noted in Morning News yesterday, he wanted to tear down historic buildings on Fifth Street to build a parking lot.

The vote has been rescheduled for May 26.

• Meanwhile, The Enquirer has the details of infighting among the Joseph family itself. Sixty-four-year-old Marie Joseph has sued big brother and Joseph Auto Group CEO Ron Joseph, accusing him of cutting his siblings out while consolidating the company’s holdings.

Apparently, this is not the first time these two Josephs have fought it out in court. The Enquirer detailed a few other rich people problems plaguing the siblings in this paragraph:

“Pineridge LLC, an entity controlled by Ron Joseph and his wife Marcia, filed a lawsuit in Hamilton County Municipal Court last year to evict Marie Joseph and her son Derek from a Mount Lookout home it planned to sell. The lawsuit claimed she'd rebuffed requests to leave since summer 2014. The home is located one block from where Ron and Marcia Joseph live.”

You can read more about all of this here.

• Hamilton County could finally be on track to update its outdated crime lab. County Commissioners yesterday accepted a proposal to build a new facility, which could cost around $40 million.

Attempts to get a plan approved that would have renovated a former hospital in Mount Airy fell through. Coroner Lackshmi Sammarco has long advocated for a new facility, as the department currently works in a 40-year-old building in need of major upgrades, which she says inhibits productivity. The coroner’s office tests all of the county’s DNA, drug, ballistics and other forensic cases, as well as similar services for more than a dozen other municipalities.

• The Banks has some new tenants lined up, including a luxury bowling alley and live music venue.

• The Supreme Court seems to be divided on President Obama’s executive action on immigration, which would temporarily grant quasi-legal status to undocumented immigrants whose children were born in the U.S. Around 4 million people could be shielded from deportation if it is upheld.

The court could end up split 4-4, however, which would uphold a lower court’s decision that has kept the actions from going into effect. Doubt this sort of thing has anything to do with why Republicans refuse to allow a confirmation hearing for Obama’s Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland no matter how bad it makes them look.

• The sponsor of a controversial Tennessee transgender bill has pulled it until at least next year. Advocates from both sides are geared up for a fight over the legislation, which would require students to use the bathroom that corresponds to their gender at birth. Perhaps the decision to table it for now might have something to do with the $1.3 billion in Title IX funding the state’s attorney general says could be in jeopardy if it passes.

• Also in Tennessee, family movie night at the Tennessee Titans football stadium got a lot more fun when the field’s sprinkler system came on.

• Also in bathroom news, hand dryers are apparently spraying viruses up into the air, though manufacturers note that this wouldn’t happen if people would wash their hands correctly before drying them with their space-age technology.

• This guy wants to know why society spends tax money on things that not everyone uses. In this case, he’s mad about the $4.2 million a year the city will pay to operate the streetcar, but probably not upset about things like this.

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