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Hayley Day
 
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The Powers That Beard

Social acceptance and curiosity shape the facial hair trends of the Queen City

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 5, 2014
If you’ve ever wondered what life in Cincinnati looked like in the early 1900s, just ride your self-repaired bicycle to the Mariemont Barber Shop for a quick grooming with a straight razor.  

Chatfield College Opens New OTR Campus

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 26, 2013
It’s no coincidence that Chatfield College is expanding into the heart of Over-the-Rhine. It’s more like destiny. Since its 1845 founding in Brown County as an Ursuline convent and school, Chatfield College (renamed as such and opened to the public in 1971) has repurposed land to educate those who lack access.  

Building Bridges

Shared art spaces enhance community and opportunity for local creative professionals

0 Comments · Wednesday, October 16, 2013
While co-working sites are the newest trend for freelance office-goers looking for cubicle-free workspaces with shareable materials, it’s nothing new for the visual artist. Community has connected with art since the coliseum was erected in Ancient Rome for public events, or since the term “community art” was birthed in the 1960s to mirror the era’s social change.   

Merit Clothiers Earns Badge of Honor

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 7, 2013
Fifteen years after finishing Girl Scouts, Cincinnati natives Brittany Yantos and Brittany Yoder are still earning merit badges. It’s all part of their American-made, eco-friendly clothing line, Merit Clothiers, available for purchase by fall 2013 on etsy.com.   

VisuaLingual's Cincinnati-centric Products Garner National Attention

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 26, 2013
It was the ever-evolving OTR landscape of empty lots and abandoned Italianate buildings that inspired Michael Stout to create what is arguably VisuaLingual’s most recognizable product — muslin vegetation bundles called “Seed Bombs.”