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John J. Kelly
 

A Hologram For The King

By Dave Eggers

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 8, 2012
There is a palpable arid and hollow feeling throughout much of Dave Eggers’ magnificent new novel, A Hologram For The King. It is set in Jeddah, on the Saudi Arabian coast, and peopled by characters who seem adrift in the vast desert and alien to their own sense of self.  

Beautiful Ruins

By Jess Walter

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 8, 2012
Beautiful Ruins is a novel filled with unforgettable characters who have insatiable appetites for all the things that success brings. Much of the charm of the novel is Walter’s ability to transport us to far-flung locations both wondrous and thrilling. It’s also a cautionary tale with some unconventional and unique methods of storytelling.  

Grammy Winner Recounts Depression, Anxiety in New Memoir

0 Comments · Tuesday, June 26, 2012
“May we all find salvation in professions that heal.” When Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter Shawn Colvin penned these lyrics in 1987, few knew that she was hinting at some long-held, “dirty secrets,” problems that went back to the singer’s teenage years and, indeed, would require “salvation,” specifically the help of psychiatrists and therapists and anti-depressants. Colvin’s new memoir, Diamond In The Rough, describes that journey in an endlessly fascinating, often-harrowing recollection of one woman’s arduous musical odyssey.  

Canada by Richard Ford

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 20, 2012
Written in a slow, languid, lyrical style so light that it nearly floats, Richard Ford’s new novel, Canada, further solidifies the author’s position among the best American writers of our time.  

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 20, 2012
A beautiful married woman suddenly and mysteriously disappears and her husband immediately becomes the chief suspect in her murder. It’s a storyline so frequently used in books and films that it’s almost become a worn-out cliché. But that is definitely not the case in Gillian Flynn’s third and latest psychological thriller, Gone Girl.  

Dust To Dust by Benjamin Busch

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Every once in a blue moon a book comes along that has the power to change the way we see our lives. That is exactly the case with an extraordinary new memoir titled Dust To Dust by Benjamin Busch.  

Anatomy of Injustice by Raymond Bonner

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 10, 2012
In January 1982, an elderly white woman in South Carolina named Dorothy Edwards was found murdered inside her home. After a botched investigation by local and state investigators and barely a shred of evidence, Edward Lee Elmore (or “Black Elmo,” as local cops liked to call him) was arrested, charged with the crime, quickly brought to trial, convicted and sentenced to death.  

The Real Romney

By Michael Kranish and Scott Helman

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is a political chameleon: a man of many faces and a past shrouded in mystery, half-truths and secrets. That’s according to The Real Romney, by Boston Globe reporters Michael Kranish and Scott Helman, the first comprehensive biography of the man many believe will be the 2012 Republican presidential nominee.  

11/22/63

By Stephen King

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 6, 2012
If you had a way to travel back in time and change the course of history, what would you do? If you’re Jake Epping, the mild-mannered Maine high school teacher who discovers a portal to the past in Stephen King’s latest classic, 11/22/63, you’d go back half a century and try to prevent the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  

The Beauty and The Sorrow by Peter Englund

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 31, 2012
In his compelling new history, The Beauty and The Sorrow: An Intimate History of the First World War, historian Peter Englund has chosen firsthand accounts from 20 very different and disparate individuals who either fought in the war or were touched in some fashion by “The Great War,” as it has been called.