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Jane Durrell
 

Art Is All Around Covington

Month-long Full Spectrum event sets out to prove city's well-rounded cultural worth

0 Comments · Monday, September 28, 2009
As Covington gets ready for Thursday's launch of its October-long Full Spectrum (a celebration of the arts intended to attract 10,000 or more visitors) it's positioning itself as a major regional cultural force. This is a move to bring overdue attention to the arts in a city traditionally overshadowed by its larger neighbor, Cincinnati, says Natalie Bowers, Covington Arts District director.  

Attractions: Museum Day

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 23, 2009
On Saturday a number of area institutions will be open free to holders of Museum Day admission cards (available at the participating institutions, even if you’re not a Smithsonian subscriber). At Betts House, the quirky little museum at 416 Clark St. two blocks west of Music Hall, Julie Carpenter, executive director, says, “Visitors can try their hand at blacksmithing, take a tour or explore our current exhibit. We think it will be fun for kids and grownups.” Among other area participants are the Fire Museum, Xavier University’s Art Gallery, and more museums than you knew existed in Ripley.  

Lit: InkTank

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 22, 2009
On Final Friday at Ink Tank, you can catch the warm-up for Northern Kentucky University’s Saturday conference, “Voices from the Hills: A Celebration of Appalachian Writers.” Major Appalachian poets and writers will read their work in Ink Tank’s friendly domain, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m., with refreshments available and the Book Bank, the book store that handles only Cincinnati-area writers, open for browsing.  

Amateur Curation

Cincinnati Art Museum’s 4th Floor Award recognizes regional artists and arts patrons

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 9, 2009
Artist Don Lambert, who wants his work to reach a wide public, is a perfect choice as the inaugural winner of the Cincinnati Art Museum’s new 4th Floor Award. Don Lambert: Supernova Terra Firma, the first 4th Floor Award exhibition, has just opened in the museum’s Vance-Waddell gallery and remains up through Nov. 29.   

Art: Supernova Terra Firma at the Cincinnati Art Museum

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 9, 2009
Artist Don Lambert, who wants his work to reach a wide public, is a perfect choice as the inaugural winner of the Cincinnati Art Museum’s new 4th Floor Award. Don Lambert: Supernova Terra Firma, the first 4th Floor Award exhibition, has just opened in the museum’s Vance-Waddell gallery and remains up through Nov. 29.  

Death Penalty Isn't a Winner

Andrew Welsh-Huggins investigates why Ohio is one of the busiest death penalty states

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 9, 2009
Offhand, what would you say Ohio has in common with the state of Texas? A propensity to execute its prisoners, that's what. In his recently released book 'No Winners Here Tonight,' Columbus-based Associated Press reporter Andrew Welsh-Huggins says that in 1958 four states accounted for half the 48 U.S. executions (Ohio, Texas, California, Georgia), and by 2000 Ohio was second only to Texas in the number of people put to death each year.   

Creative Economics

State of the arts: Tightening belts and adapting in order to continue thriving

1 Comments · Wednesday, September 2, 2009
Staff positions have taken the biggest hit as Cincinnati's arts and cultural institutions hunker down to survive the recession. Some organizations have adapted through deliberate attrition, while other belt-tightening measures have included shorter hours and curtailed programming. "It's a painful time," says Raphaela Platow, director of the Contemporary Arts Center. The bright side (surprisingly, there is one) is that attendance is up for many organizations.  

Lit: Richard Hague

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 26, 2009
Poet Richard Hague says one of the poems he will read on Final Friday at Ink Tank is a “mock epic about sex (almost), drugs (well, cheap wine), Rock & Roll (definitely) and high school (O, Lordy), titled “Buddy Holly’s Glasses.” Besides Holly’s glasses, Hague’s poems consider “Resisting the SAT,” “Riot” and the handling of Hurricane Katrina victims, all from his book Public Hearings, just off the press. He will dip into each of the book’s four sections (“On the Street,” “In School,” “In Country” and “States of the Arts”) for the reading. 7 p.m.  

Natural Innocence

Lisa Britton shows nature through the eyes of a child

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 5, 2009
Photographer Lisa Britton has been recording every day of her almost-5-year-old daughter Angela's short life. She often concentrates on Angela's exploration of the natural world and has chosen works with that theme for 'Seeing Nature,' her exhibition of color photographs on display at Parkside Cafe in Walnut Hills.  

Art: Seeing Nature at the Parkside Cafe

1 Comments · Tuesday, August 4, 2009
Photographer Lisa Britton has been recording every day of her almost-five-year-old daughter Angela’s short life. She often concentrates on Angela’s exploration of the natural world and has chosen works with that theme for Seeing Nature, her exhibition of color photographs on display at Parkside Café in Walnut Hills. The exhibit is on view daily through Sept. 11.