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CPS, State Refuse to Address Taft Erasures

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 14, 2012
If Cincinnati Board of Education members harbor any doubts about the validity of graduation test scores at Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School, they’re not sharing them publicly.  

CPS Board Member to Question Test Erasures

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Cincinnati Public Schools board member Eileen Cooper-Reed plans to raise questions about test scores at Taft Information Technology High School at the board’s March 12 meeting in response to a recent CityBeat article (“Miracle or Mirage?,” issue of Feb. 22) that delved into contrasting Ohio Graduation Test and ACT test scores at Taft in 2010 and 2011.   
cooperreed

CPS Board Member to Bring Up Taft Erasure Analysis

Eileen Cooper-Reed will broach the subject at March 12 school board meeting

{CommentsCant} · Friday, March 2, 2012
Following CityBeat's Feb. 22 cover story outlining test-score discrepancies at Taft Information Technology High School, a Cincinnati Public Schools board member tells CityBeat that she plans to raise those questions as a topic of discussion at the board’s next meeting. The article, “Miracle or ...  

Miracle or Mirage?

ACT scores and a mysteriously ended cheating probe raise questions about Taft High School’s climb to the top

8 Comments · Tuesday, February 21, 2012
In a Cincinnati neighborhood plagued by high rates of blight, poverty and crime, the new $18.4 million Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School in the West End couldn’t offer a more contrasting narrative. While city police book killers and other suspected felons right next door, Taft students are enriching their minds in nine computer labs and exploring the world through wall-to-wall Wi-Fi.   

A Perk for the Powerful No More

Illegal sealing of divorce records ends, except for one case

1 Comments · Wednesday, May 5, 2010
For a long time, one of the perks of being well-connected and, typically, well-to-do in Hamilton County was divorce proceedings insulated from public view. Until three or four years ago, it was a common practice among Domestic Relations Court judges to seal divorce files simply because the parties wanted to keep their aborted marriages encrypted as "Sealed Case v. Sealed Case." It appears that the county now frowns on processing divorces in secret.