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Ben L. Kaufman
 

Local Corporations Tried to Control Health Care Costs Before, and They Failed

0 Comments · Monday, March 1, 2010
General Electric boss Jeffrey Immelt wants major businesses to create a regional cooperative to deal with major shortcomings (limited access, rising costs) of our health system. Something similar was tried in 1992, when the big four employers (P&G, Kroger, GE Aviation and Cincinnati Bell) basically sought to control costs by demanding that hospitals demonstrate cost effectiveness. Facing threats to their fees, unhappy physicians used scare tactics to predict a health care crisis as specialists left for more lucrative cities.  

TV Weather Forecasters Force the Snow/Danger Drumbeat

2 Comments · Wednesday, February 17, 2010
True to their tribe, local TV forecasters created as much anxiety as possible recently about a storm moving into our region. Day after day, we learned nothing new from redundant presentations and banter with anchors. It was like a sermon: The more fearful their ceaseless drumming makes us, the likelier we are to stay tuned for redemption.   

Supreme Court: Let's Fight Words With Words, Not Muzzles

0 Comments · Monday, February 1, 2010
It didn't take long before I realized the true horror of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision freeing corporations to spend freely to support political campaigns. It wasn't the new potential for corruption or wealth drowning out other voices. It's the promise of more campaign ads on local TV.  

Separation Between News Reporting and Opinion Is Like Church and State

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 19, 2010
Believe what you want, there is a difference between news and advocacy. Forget that and it's editorializing, a corrosive mixture of news and opinion in the guise of news. Exhibit A: the recent Enquirer story reporting as fact a local woman's ability to foretell the future. If that weren't enough, the paper provided contact information for anyone wanting a private "reading."  

2010 Predictions for the World of Media

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 5, 2010
Local journalists aren't exempt from the love/hate generated by the command to compile lists of top stories at the end of each year or decade. More than anything, it's a chance to remind everyone how smart they were when they wrote the first draft of what's become history. But rather than remind you of my failings in the past year or decade, let me suggest what 2010 might hold for the news media.  

The Enquirer Does Less With Less, Loses Circulation

0 Comments · Monday, December 21, 2009
Life can be tough at the top of the Enquirer food chain. Circulation (printed papers sold) continues to decline. The paper has retired, bought out and fired just about everyone it can to cut costs. More unpaid furloughs are likely. I have no idea how profitable The Enquirer remains. The paper doesn't say. It never does, at least publicly. Yet its slumping core paid circulation doesn't encourage optimism.  

A Man, a Dog, a 'Study' and Hurried, Gullible Reporters

2 Comments · Monday, December 7, 2009
A recent banner story on page 1 of The Enquirer's Local Life reported that Cincinnati Country Day was the second best high school in Ohio, based on passing percentage on state graduation tests and some yet-to-be revealed formula. The real story, if there was one, came later when it was mentioned that five Cincinnati area schools were in the top 10, including a public high school, Walnut Hills. I'm surprised the "study" dreamed up by a Columbus man in his basement survived The Enquirer's crap detector.  

Teachable Moment on Censoring Objectionable Messages

0 Comments · Monday, November 23, 2009
NKU's student paper was wrong to cancel ads for Resistance Records because the advertiser's racism offends the editor. And Editor Tim Owens was wrong to publish an apology for carrying the ads. If he were going to apologize, it should have been for invoking his beliefs to justify silencing an advertiser.  

Government Bailout of Newspaper Business a Terrible Idea

0 Comments · Tuesday, November 10, 2009
Some veteran and excellent journalists are suggesting a taxpayer bailout for financially floundering (and possibly foundering) daily newspapers. My objection is an old one: "If you accept the Queen's shilling, you dance the Queen's tune." Lower postal rates for newspapers and magazines are a good idea, but direct government financing would be toxic, whether it involved our national dailies, local papers or the Associated Press, a cooperative owned by daily papers.  

Whom Would a Federal Shield Law Shield?

0 Comments · Tuesday, October 27, 2009
Congress is considering a federal shield law for journalists whose sources, notes, unused images and testimony sometimes are demanded by federal courts and officials. At its most basic level, a shield must protect reporters' promises of confidentiality to sources. Otherwise, reporters will have to choose between breaking their promise or jail. State laws provide some shield but not in federal proceedings. Still, I'm no fan of shield laws.