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Steven Rosen
 

Darren Hanlon

April 7 • Southgate House

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 5, 2011
Young and smartly romantic Australian musician Darren Hanlon will be accompanied at his latest stop at the Southgate House by Shelley Short (who provides harmonies and sings duets with him on I Will Love You At All) and Australian drummer Stephanie Hughes. Short, from Portland, will open the show and sing from her own recordings, with Hanlon and Hughes accompanying her.  

Music: Darren Hanlon

0 Comments · Tuesday, April 5, 2011
Darren Hanlon, the young and smartly romantic Australian musician who's touring in support of his first American album, 'I Will Love You At All', is talking to me from a tour stop. His conversation is peppered with references to friends and favorite influences — Stephin Merritt's quirkily, jauntily literate American band Magnetic Fields, the gifted confessional Swedish singer/songwriter Jens Lekman, fiery and soul-bearing British troubadour Billy Bragg.  

From Punk to Page

Dead Boys guitarist Cheetah Chrome does book tour

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 30, 2011
Chrome, the explosively thrashing guitarist/songwriter with the key American Punk band the Dead Boys, will be at the Comet in Northside at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday as part of the unusual, trend-setting Cleveland Confidential Authors Tour. All three of the authors who will be reading from/signing their books at the free event — Chrome, Mike Hudson and Bob Pfeifer — have their roots in Cleveland Punk bands.  

Art: Brighton Gallery Openings

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 29, 2011
While it would be pushing it to call Brighton a true art district yet, it has several of the city's best and most serious-minded alternative galleries. Because their hours are so limited, it's not often easy to see work at them in one night — or at all. Thus, the fact three galleries there are sharing an opening night from 7-10 p.m. this Saturday serves as a golden opportunity to get down there.  

With Much Fanfare

“Fanfares” and CSO’s not-so-quiet role in shaping American culture

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Without much fanfare — well, actually, with fanfare — the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) has played a key role in the shaping of American popular culture as we know it. That’s the contention made — a bit indirectly — by Sean Wilentz, a Princeton University professor, in his recent book Bob Dylan in America.  

When Art and Nature Collide

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 23, 2011
I run into people who don’t like museums because they say they prefer nature’s beauty to art. That comment is wrong-headed and shortsighted on so many levels — and I say that as someone who likes nature. First of all, nature can operate so mysteriously that it needs an artist to express to us the poetic depths of both its complexity and simplicity. But art isn’t an alternative to nature. They’re not separate.  

Ontage: Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra with Stewart Goodyear

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 22, 2011
Without much fanfare — well, actually, with fanfare — the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra has played a key role in the shaping of American popular culture as we know it. That's the contention made — a bit indirectly — by Sean Wilentz, a Princeton University professor, in his recent book 'Bob Dylan in America.' Wilentz's claims are based on the fact that the CSO commissioned American composer Aaron Copland's “Fanfare for the Common Man” during World War II.  

Apocalypse Again

Battle: LA is the kind of movie 9/11 was supposed to make unthinkable

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 16, 2011
We tend to forget now that Hollywood’s 9/11 guilt — the Onion famously compared the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon to a “bad Jerry Bruckheimer movie” — produced a cease-fire on using CGI to churn out $100 million-plus films depicting mass urban destruction. Even Bruckheimer, the chief culprit of such films, decided to turn to more benign movie fantasies like Pirates of the Caribbean (and crime series for TV). Alas, while hardly a flop, Master and Commander didn’t earn the kind of money domestically ($94 million) to make Hollywood clamor for more. And, slowly but steadily, with time we’ve been seeing a return to the pre-9/11 urban-destruction extravaganzas. The new Battle: Los Angeles is a prime example.  

Should Everybody Love a Circus?

Circus poster exhibition more thought-provoking than you might think

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 9, 2011
When does something become art? One answer is when a museum shows it. Thus, the current show at the Cincinnati Art Museum through July 20, The Amazing American Circus Poster: The Strobridge Lithographing Company, qualifies as art. And I doubt few of the visitors to this exhibit will quarrel with this claim.  

Provocative Lectures at Our Art Museums

0 Comments · Wednesday, March 9, 2011
In recent weeks, there have been some thought-provoking guests at our art museums. I’ve attended talks by the French superstar street artist/photographer JR at Contemporary Arts Center and renowned architect Billie Tsien, who is designing the new Barnes Collection building in Philadelphia, at the Cincinnati Art Museum. Both offered ideas and comments worthy of further discussion.