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Steven Rosen
 

Ohio Connections Plentiful In L.A. Art Shows

0 Comments · Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Sometimes you have to leave Ohio — and Cincinnati — to discover how many interesting and unusual connections there are between the Buckeye State and the larger world of modern/contemporary arts and design.   
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Oscars Give Short Shrift to Foreign, Documentary Categories

{CommentsCant} · Wednesday, February 29, 2012
Now that Sunday night’s Oscars are over, the Internet is full of catty stories and tweets parsing every last second of televised coverage, from Angelina Jolie’s exposed leg to Adam Sandler’s participation in a taped segment in which actors discussed why they love movies. (If he really loved movies, he’d stop making them, some have said.) It’s both understandable and sad that the Oscars — and movie-award season in general — ends like this, with far more interest in the telecast’s trivia than in the movies that win awards. Arguably, the news value of this year’s show peaked before it even officially started, when Sacha Baron Cohen, in costume as “The Dictator” for an upcoming movie, spilled an urn of faux human ashes (ostensibly Kim Jong-il’s) on interviewer Ryan Seacrest. It’s getting worse, too, now that the Internet and 200+-channel cable television have educated us ad nauseam to the nature and inner workings of the Oscar campaign season. We carefully learn how a film builds momentum by moving through all the secondary award ceremonies from critics groups and the Hollywood professional guilds and associations. As a result, the Academy Awards themselves have become anticlimactic, which partially explains the media devotion to dissecting the telecast. And the attempts by the Motion Picture Academy to build false enthusiasm by allowing up to ten Best Picture nominees have been a disaster, since we all now know how to “read” the   nominations to distinguish the real ones (they also have Best Director nods) from the padding. Not all that long ago, few outside Hollywood insiders even knew there was a well-orchestrated “campaign season,” much less how to follow and handicap it.
Convention wisdom, and you hear a lot of it these days, would be to revive the Oscar telecast by de-emphasizing the importance of the awards, themselves. Reduce the number given out on TV, especially the more esoteric or niche ones, in favor of increasing the glitz, spectacle, star power and big production numbers. Do like the Grammys have done, where classical, jazz, folk, blues, opera, international and more are rarely ever presented on the show.
But I think the Academy should go the other way and try to increase public awareness of the importance of Oscar nominations. But maybe not for the Big Four categories – Best Picture, Director, Actor and Actress, which probably do suffer from overexposure by the time the telecast comes around (although The Artist, this year’s big winner, could use the help since many people have been scared off by the fact it’s a black-and-white silent film).Click the jump for more on ways the Academy could draw more attention to deserving films such as A Separation, In Darkness, Footnote and Bullhead.    

Art: The Art of Food

0 Comments · Monday, February 27, 2012
Whereas many galleries and art centers often serve food at the opening receptions of their shows, Covington's Carnegie Galleries has had quite a bit of success going one step further—actually st  

Collage Degrees

The Taft’s current Romare Bearden exhibit is a multi-dimensional revelation

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 21, 2012
Having recently seen a retrospective of Romare Bearden’s artwork at Mint Museum of Art in Charlotte, N.C., his hometown, I wasn’t expecting the Taft Museum’s current and smaller Impressions and Improvisations: The Prints of Romare Bearden to be as impressive as it is.   

A Great American Sculptor’s Show Visits Columbus

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 21, 2012
Columbus’ Wexner Center for the Arts makes a bold statement in its current retrospective of David Smith’s work: He’s the greatest American sculptor of the 20th century. If Smith, who died in an auto accident in 1965 at age 59, is ahead of Alexander Calder, Isamu Noguchi or Richard Serra, I’m not sure the general public knows it.   

Art: Leonardo Live

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Fathom Events presents Leonardo Live, a guided walk-through of the sold-out Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan exhibition at London's National Gallery. This tour, whic  

Saving a Modernist Cincinnati Kitchen

0 Comments · Wednesday, February 8, 2012
When Chuck Lohre and Janet Groeber learned the innovative kitchen at Hyde Park’s landmark 1960 Corbett House was being replaced by new owners, they shifted into action to save it. They offered to take it and the owners agreed. They acquired the kitchen in 2010. Now, no longer wanting to store the disassembled kitchen, they are trying to find a new home for it.  

Carl Solway Celebrates John Cage Centennial

0 Comments · Tuesday, January 24, 2012
Carl Solway, celebrating his 50th year as a Cincinnati gallerist, was speaking recently to arts patrons in the residence at Hamilton’s Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park about the milestone that is his new show. He’s presenting a John Cage show, he said, because Cage was the 20th Century’s greatest artist.    

Suitable For Display

Mixed Media artist Nick Cave brings his Soundsuits to Cincy

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 18, 2012
Nick Cave refers to himself as a “trans” artist because his work transcends so many categories — sculpture, fashion, performance, dance, fine crafts, contemporary art — that it turns the whole notion of artistic categories upside-down. His artwork — known as Soundsuits — also deserves to be considered “trans” because seeing it can be a transformational experience for the viewer.   

WEBB 2.0

Forty years on, legendary songwriter Jimmy Webb finds his voice

0 Comments · Wednesday, January 18, 2012
The AOL Music website describes Jimmy Webb as “that rarity in Rock music, a professional songwriter who achieved stardom in that capacity,” pointing out that almost all of Rock’s other great songwriters became well-known for their own versions of their material.