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Ryan Mclendon
 
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Titus Andronicus with Ted Leo and the Pharmacists

June 15 • Southgate House

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 10, 2009
Titus Andronicus is a catalyst trying to destroy music. While the band is definitely not for the faint of eardrum, there is a surprising amount of depth and devotion to their sound.   

Music: Titus Andronicus

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 10, 2009
Titus Andronicus is a catalyst trying to destroy music. While the band is definitely not for the faint of eardrum, there is a surprising amount of depth and devotion to their sound. The Airing of Grievances isn’t a crying-into-my-PBR kind of album, but rather it comes from somewhere more genuine. It’s often funny (really, a song about Festivus has to be amusing) and heartfelt, raw and contemplative. It makes us feel bad about inserting a quintessential sad Emo bastard joke (read: Dashboard Confessional).  

Music: Wilco

0 Comments · Wednesday, June 10, 2009
Nels Cline, Wilco's current axeman and former prolific recording artist, was chosen by Rolling Stone as one of the “Top 20 New Guitar Gods” of 2007. See him play with Jeff Tweedy and the whole band at the Aronoff. The Heartless Bastards are opening.  

Happy Chichester with Roger Klug

May 15 • 20th Century Theater

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 13, 2009
Chichester's regional dominance is supreme because he's a fantastic human being and even better performer. He's like a homegrown Ryan Adams with little more soul and a harmonica a la mode. His songs are rich with Midwest emotion, longing and ire, often set to swampy, bluesy guitar or piano.  

Music: Happy Chichester

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 12, 2009
Harold “Happy” Chichester, former frontman of Howlin’ Maggie, bassist for Royal Crescent Mob and auxiliary member of The Afghan Whigs and Twilight Singers, is like a homegrown Ryan Adams with little more soul and a harmonica a la mode. His songs are rich with Midwest emotion, longing and ire, often set to swampy, bluesy guitar or piano. See him at the 20th Century Theater with Roger Klug.  

Music: Kings of Leon

1 Comments · Monday, May 11, 2009
Little do Kings of Leon know, but they are the quintessential manifestation of what American dreams of are made of. With a little grit and even more moxie, a rag-tag troupe of country boys with a nothing more than a song to sing — and a little pomp and swagger — can eventually rattle the hallowed chambers of Madison Square Garden. They and their guests The Walkmen open the PNC Pavilion's outdoor concert season Tuesday evening. The show is sold out.  

Manchester Orchestra with Fun and Audrye Sessions

May 7 • The Mad Hatter

1 Comments · Wednesday, May 6, 2009
A time-tested method for getting attention is to start your music career young with an unabashed, ball-outs zeal and crank out as much product as fast as possible, much like the foursome from Atlanta, Manchester Orchestra. With the average age of the band being 21, they've already produced two full-length studio albums, something that might be easy to do when young and depressed (and possibly monstrous).   

Music: Manchester Orchestra

0 Comments · Wednesday, May 6, 2009
Manchester Orchestra, the foursome from Atlanta, started their career young with an unabashed, ball-outs zeal and cranked out as much product as fast as possible. They've developed some of the most folksy, prosaic and delightful records of the new millennium -- traditional Americana on downers -- and shows no sign of stopping. See them at the Mad Hatter with Fun, Audrye Sessions and Winston Audio.  

Collective Consciousness

Of Montreal finds itself a decade-long overnight sensation

1 Comments · Wednesday, April 22, 2009
Of Montreal, the non-Canadian, pro-vaudevillian, Ziggy Stardust-esque troupe from Athens, Ga., seemed to have come out of nowhere, even though they released their first album, 'Cherry Peel,' in 1997. But it wasn't until 2005, when the album 'Sunlandic Twins' was released, that Of Montreal began to cause a stir. Previously, their vibrant, synth-driven, flamboyant energy was seemingly fed the glittery residue left by bands long since deemed irrelevant to average music consumers: Queen, David Bowie and Prince.   

Peter, Bjorn and John

April 24 • Southgate House

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 22, 2009
Swedes Peter Bjorn and John are the Euro version of Peter, Paul and Mary, with two great distinctions: They have good songs and are savagely non-irritating. But their appeal rests in the fact that they sound foreign to American ears, which often expect music to change our lives or make us want to get up and break something.