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Steve Rosen
 

Art: The Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 15, 2009
One of Frank Lloyd Wright’s last residential commissions was the John E. Christian House in West Lafayette, Ind., completed 50 years ago during the year of Wright’s death. Called Samara, it was a mature example of his Usonian homes, combining art, nature and architecture. The Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati is hosting an exhibition of photographs, artifacts and designs by Wright for Dr. Christian, who worked closely (along with his late wife, Catherine) with Wright on the home. Opening reception will be 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Foundation’s downtown gallery. Through Nov. 17.  

Music: The Baseball Project

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 15, 2009
Cincinnati Reds history will be made when The Baseball Project (Steve Wynn, Scott McCaughey, Peter Buck and Linda Pitmon) makes its first appearance here at the Southgate House on Saturday night. No, these venerable, veteran Alternative Rock musicians won't be announcing they're buying the Reds and changing their name to The Sex Pistols. Instead, they plan to use the local date to publicly debut their brand-new song "Pete Rose Way," recorded for the upcoming 'Baseball Project Vol. 2' album.  

Art: Morgan Aero 8 at the Cincinnati Art Museum

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 8, 2009
The Cincinnati Art Museum seems to have found a real crowd pleaser with its rotating exhibition of high-design automobiles -- displaying one at a time for several months each. The latest, which went on display Sept. 1 and stays out through Jan. 11, is a black 2007 Morgan Aero 8, the first new design since 1968 from the British Morgan Motor Company, which has been hand-building special-order, wooden-framed vehicles since 1910.  

Art: Semantics Gallery Fundraiser

0 Comments · Thursday, August 27, 2009
semantics gallery, that outpost of Cincinnati avant-gardism in the funky Brighton District, culminates its month-long annual fundraising effort on Saturday with its 7-11 p.m. Angel Spotted Above semantics Gallery auction of more than 100 artworks by such stalwarts as Amy Scarpello, Andrew van Sickle, Andy Marko, Kate Kern and the interestingly named Thriftstore Boratorium. Gallery supporters will be welcomed with musical entertainment, a selection of fine beers and a modern-dance fashion show put on by Pones Inc. Dancers.  

Art: Stitches in Time on the Olympic Peninsula at NKU

0 Comments · Tuesday, August 18, 2009
Stitches in Time on the Olympic Peninsula, a show of paintings made by Kevin Muente last summer in Olympic National Park with accompanying text by Robert Wallace, opens Monday at the third-floor gallery of Northern Kentucky's Fine Arts Center. It runs through Sept. 25. The show, for which the two men — both of whom teach at NKU — traveled to Washington's Olympic Peninsula, features dramatic landscapes from the coast, the rainforest and the mountains. There will be a reception 5-8 p.m. Aug. 27 and a lecture 3:15-4:30 p.m. Sept. 10.  

'Time-Based Art' Looks Great at CAC

0 Comments · Wednesday, August 12, 2009
So often has it been said that the Contemporary Arts Center needs to carefully select shows to fit its unconventional Zaha Hadid-designed space that it's almost a mantra. As has been seen in the past, imported traveling exhibits (especially group shows relying on paintings) have a tendency to get lost amidst the angles, offbeat spaces, stairways and hidden corners of the downtown building's interior. But the current Anri Sala show interacts so well and so completely with its two CAC floors that the experience is transformative.   

Art: Emil Robinson at the Taft Museum of Art

0 Comments · Tuesday, August 4, 2009
The Taft Museum has launched a new program, Keystone Contemporary, that uses the intimate Keystone Gallery to present new work by an emerging contemporary artist and thus carry on the tradition of the Taft of supporting artists. Cincinnati representational painter Emil Robinson has been selected for the first show, and he has provided four new works -- a large, cloud-dominated landscape, two figure studies on oval panels, and a painterly-appearing digital photograph mounted on aluminum and polyethylene composite panel. The show is up Wednesday-Sunday through Oct. 18.  

Art: The Architecture of Painting at the Columbus Museum of Art

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 21, 2009
If you want to get ahead of a major artistic rediscovery in 2010, travel up to Columbus Museum of Art before Aug. 2 to see The Architecture of Painting: Charles Burchfield. It includes watercolors the Ohio-born artist made between 1918-1920 in his home state, after returning from World War I and before moving to Buffalo. Too expressionist to be considered an American Scene painter, his work seems somewhere between Hopper and Edvard Munch, with a keen eye for early-20th Century architecture. It remains powerful today.  

Attractions: Vent Haven

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 14, 2009
Vent Haven is the only major public museum devoted to ventriloquism (the art of throwing voices) and has more than 750 historic and/or unusual ventriloquial figures — colloquially and sometimes controversially known as “dummies.” The museum is open for guided tours by appointment only from May through September. Admission fee is a $5 donation.  

Art: Losing Our Faculties at Semantics

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 14, 2009
Admirably using conceptual, performance and installation art for politically and economically relevant ends, semantics gallery looks at how the ongoing recession is detrimentally affecting the teaching of fine arts in the show Losing Our Faculties, open now through July 25 at the gallery. Artists address how wage stagnation and underemployment are affecting adjunct faculty and part-time art instructors in this area. Noon-4 p.m. Saturdays.