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Steve Rosen
 

Art Shook Up

Elvis has entered the art gallery with new Paul Laffoley exhibit

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 29, 2014
The strange ways we remember Elvis Presley are best summed up by the lyrics of the late Warren Zevon’s “Jesus Mentioned,” in which he imagines traveling to Memphis to see the dead King: “He went walking on the water … with his pills.”   

Art: Empire Falling: New Photographs from Elena Dorfman

0 Comments · Wednesday, April 24, 2013
The huge stone quarries that hide in the landscapes of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky are strange things, monsters of ruggedly carved-out negative space that — when abandoned and filled with water — a  
inside a contained container

Even Without a Chicken Dance, FotoFocus is a Worthy ‘Octoberfest’

{CommentsCant} · Wednesday, October 24, 2012
From now on, when anyone mentions “Octoberfest” in Cincinnati, I’m going to think first of FotoFocus. This year, its first, it has clearly established itself as an artistically meaningful and rewarding addition to Cincinnati’s cultural calendar. The next is planned for 2014. It is also, like that other Oktoberfest (which actually occurs in Septemb...  
hawk photo

FotoFocus Takes Cincinnati By Storm

{CommentsCant} · Monday, October 8, 2012
Having wrapped up a very busy first (extended) weekend of FotoFocus activities, I’m humbled by the fact that I only got to a portion of the exhibits and events occurring under the month-long, regional photography festival’s umbrella. Before it’s over, more than 70 shows and related special events — like this Wednesday’s concert at the Emery Theatre by Bill Frisell/858 Quarter, featur...  

Event: Fotofocus Lecture

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 21, 2012
The Lightborne lecture at Cincinnati Art Museum, featuring internationally recognized photographers, has been renamed the FotoFocus lecture this year in recognition of the upcoming citywide photo e  

Art: Over the Cities Your Grass Will Grow

0 Comments · Tuesday, February 14, 2012
The Cincinnati Art Museum is screening the meditative new documentary Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow, about German painter Anselm Kiefer's years of transforming an old French silk  

Art: 1848 Daguerreotype Panorama

0 Comments · Tuesday, July 26, 2011
Since the Main Library last May restored and put on display its famous 1848 daguerreotype Panorama of the Cincinnati riverfront, some 2,000 people have come downtown to see it and to use the two accompanying interactive touch-screen displays that allow visitors to zoom in on magnified, digitized images from the original photograph. Now the library has created a website, accessible from any computer, with many of the same features.  

Music: The Monkees

0 Comments · Tuesday, June 21, 2011
Yes, the appearance of the Monkees — Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones and Peter Tork — at Aronoff Center for the Arts on Saturday night could be considered merely an oldies/nostalgia show. But it is much more. The group, augmented by a veritable orchestra of musicians, will play the hit songs first recorded when their stylish, Beatles-influenced 1966-1968 television show was the rage — "I'm a Believer," "Last Trains to Clarksville," "Daydream Believer," "Words" and more were smashes.  

Art: Aloha Means Both Hello and Goodbye

0 Comments · Monday, June 20, 2011
Perhaps Cincinnati's best and most ambitious alternative art space — U-turn in the Brighton District — is ending its impressive run with a closing party starting at 7 p.m. Saturday, and all are invited. There will be refreshments and music. Over the course of its two years, U-turn's five curators/operators have found artists from here and afar to present arresting, beautiful and serious work. So come say goodbye.  

Art: White People: A Retrospective

0 Comments · Tuesday, May 24, 2011
One of the things that made the Cincinnati Post so good — and made it so important to the city — was its background as a blue-collar, afternoon newspaper. For better and worse, as the fortunes of the working-class declined in post-industrial Cincinnati, the Post could capture some heart-wrenching portraits of people on the fringes. Melvin Grier, a photojournalist for the late, lamented Post for some 30 years, was responsible for quite a few of those portraits.