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by Rick Pender 11.22.2013
Posted In: Theater at 10:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
abe lincoln as a rapper - complete history of comedy - playhouse - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Comedies Abound

The theater season takes a bit of a pause around Thanksgiving, since many companies are readying holiday productions. But there are plenty of choices available this weekend.

I'm not the only one who enjoyed the laugh-fest that is The Complete History of Comedy (abridged) at the Cincinnati Playhouse. I've heard numerous people who saw it say they were recommending it to others. In two hours the Reduced Shakespeare Company puts forth more humor than you can shake a stick at. (But be careful shaking sticks. You might get a pie in the face.) No matter your tastes in comedy — witty, loud or rude and crude — you'll find it in this production. How about Abe Lincoln as a deadpan rapper? This could be a good outing this weekend or a lot of fun for out-of-town guests who descend on you next week. Tickets: 513-421-3888.

Tonight is an opening at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, the very frothy comedy Twelfth Night. (It's subtitle is "or What You Will," indicating that it's a lot of foolishness, which is an apt description.) In fact, Twelfth Night is a beautiful piece with clever situations, amusing characters, a bit of intrigue and a lot of mistaken identities. And several of the most laughable characters Shakespeare ever created, from the bombastic Malvolio to his persecutor Sir Toby Belch and Sir Andrew Aguecheek, plus the best of all Shakespeare's fools, Feste. It's a safe bet that this is a production that even those who fear Shakespeare will truly enjoy. Tickets: 513-381-2273 x 1.

If you're more into storefront theater, you might check out the current production by Untethered Theater at Clifton Performance Theatre on Ludlow, just east of the business district. It's a tiny space (only 50 seats), but that makes it all the more interesting. The current production is Wendy Macleod's The House of Yes, a very dark comedy about a weirdly dysfunctional family. The story focuses happens while there's a Thanksgiving hurricane outside, so it's timely, too. Performances Friday and Saturday (through Dec. 7). Go here for tickets.

This is the last weekend for Boeing Boeing, a crazy farce about a guy juggling three fiancees who happen to be flight attendants. It's at the Carnegie, featuring performers from the drama program at UC's College-Conservatory of Music. Tickets: 859-957-1940.

 
 
by Drew Klein 11.20.2013
Posted In: Performance Art at 09:20 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sun_credit foteini christofilopoulou

REVIEW: Performa 13 (Part Three)

CAC performance curator Drew Klein reports from arts biennial in NYC

Meeting with other curators and programmers while I'm traveling always gets me eager to head back to Cincinnati to start plugging away at full speed on new projects. So I was in a privileged situation on Friday to find myself at the Performa Hub (the official festival HQ) for a casual meet and greet. The conversations there with curators from organizations and institutions like Performa and Tate Modern in London gave me a fresh perspective on the kinds of performances that are making waves internationally and piquing the interest of curators from some of the premiere programs around the world.

Following coffee and chitchat, the participating curators were introduced to Turkish artist/activist Ahmet Ögüt and his project The Silent University. First started in London, the goal of this platform is to share the knowledge of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants in different forms — lectures, consulting or other means — that utilize their cultural and educational insight. Contributors have had various levels of professional and/or educational experience in their homeland, but are prevented from obtaining work or exercising in their field whilst their legal status is in flux. Instead of being silenced by political barriers, The Silent University looks to provide an outlet for participants to activate their abilities and draw attention to the failure to celebrate the skills and experience many asylum seekers bring with them from their countries. It is proposed that the mission of The Silent University can be viewed as a creative one as the participants often use performance, writing and open dialogue to explore various themes relevant to the program. While certainly not a traditional manner of performance art, seeing how Ahmet Ögüt approaches new ways of addressing this situation brought a new appreciation for looking at old problems in a completely new light.

The big show for the night saw me head to Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) with CAC Director and Chief Curator Raphaela Platow to see Sun, the latest dance piece from acclaimed Israeli-born, Britain-based choreographer Hofesh Shechter. A packed theater was introduced to the work via an announcement that the company was to show us a snippet of the very end of the piece in order to ensure us that “everything is going to be OK”. A comedic beginning to a performance full of sharp wit and contrast. Consisting of various vignettes that reappeared at points throughout the performance, Sun utilizes smart lighting and a brutal sound design (composed for the most part by Shechter himself) to rather brilliantly and swiftly turn on a dime and take the piece from moments of intensity and anger to those of subtle and soft humor; highly sexualized slo-mo gyrations of female dancers to male dancers prancing around the stage with cutout sheep drawings. Sun was certainly intent on making a political point of some kind. The aforementioned sheep cutouts were being stalked by a wolf, cutouts of indigenous tribesmen were being stalked into conversing with a colonist, and at one point a dancer addresses (shrieks at) the crowd with, “The wolf is behind you!”

While those more interested in the message might have been somewhat frustrated by the political clichés, the dance was the draw and the dance didn't disappoint. Prior to the performance I had been told that Shechter would become one of the leading choreographers of my time. Those major words were met and complemented with some of the most impressive company work I've seen recently. Each dancer in the 16-person company (besides sharing that they were striking and in the same, great shape) wore soft shades of white or cream, resembling a team consisting of artists from various genres and centuries. It was in the moments when the entire company was on stage, fluidly realizing Shechter's intricate and tightly controlled choreography, that the program truly became nothing less than mesmerizing. Strongly gestural, each company member looked entirely confident embodying this work, so much so that you would have thought that Sun had been a part of their repertoire for years rather than just less than a month. I left BAM wishing I'd been a contemporary dancer. I wanted to be in Hofesh Shechter's company. I'd carry a sheep, I'd head bang, I'd scream and rant at the audience — whatever it'd take to get me into that gang.

Follow citybeat.com for more Performa 13 updates from Drew Klein.

 
 
by Drew Klein 11.18.2013
Posted In: Opera, Performance Art at 10:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
two boys_credit sara krulwich

REVIEW: Nico Muhly's 'Two Boys' (Metropolitan Opera, New York)

CAC performance curator Drew Klein reports from NYC

The main event Thursday evening was not a part of Performa 13. Instead, the evening saw my virgin visit to the Metropolitan Opera to take in the final night of composer (and frequent Cincinnati visitor) Nico Muhly's Two Boys. Muhly became the youngest composer to be commissioned by the Met when they asked him to create a new work in 2006. Having a run in 2011 in London in a co-production with English National Opera, Two Boys finally made its American debut last month.

Based on true events in Manchester, England, 10 years ago, the story centers on a seemingly normal 16-year-old boy and his involvement in a confusing web of chat room relationships that ultimately lead to him stabbing and nearly killing a 13-year-old boy. It was, shall we say, not your standard opera fare. While I've not been to many an opera in my life thus far, I don't imagine there have been many to have featured projected chat acronyms and two separate instances of onstage masturbation. But on to the show.

The story of Two Boys is a complicated one, without question. A young boy has been stabbed, his friend and the only witness, Brian, is the key suspect, and an over-worked and under-appreciated police detective is tasked with putting the pieces together in a case she never wanted to take. As we begin to learn more about Brian, we are shown a world of chat room conversations and desperate boys seeking connections that mean something. By the end, we understand that the young boy pretended to be three different people in various roles and chats with Brian, concocting an insanely complex story before, essentially, convincing Brian to stab him while he would repeat, “I love you, bro” to the dying boy. Everyone has access to a search engine, so I'll let you look up the story on your own...

A certain triumph for Two Boys is the set design and realization of an online world on a physical stage. Multiple large-scale projections land upon movable walls that dance across the stage at various depths. Frequently these walls become transparent and reveal young people inside, half-illuminated by laptop screens. The multimedia execution inspired and amazed, serving to highlight the production's digital world concept and add a new and exciting layer to a traditional performance form.

Knowing Muhly's work rather well, and having enjoyed the chance to see him twice in Cincinnati in the past 18 months as part of MusicNOW and Tatiana Berman's Constella Festival, I was eager to hear what he had done for Two Boys. I was somewhat surprised — though pleased — to find that this work did not veer too far from his compositional oeuvre; dark with intricate rhythms, the score never threatens to take complete control of the production, while the influence of modern composers like Benjamin Britten and Meredith Monk, as he acknowledged in the program notes, could be felt throughout. For me, the standout compositional moments came in the form of choral scenes performed by the company carrying laptops in their hands, faces lit and animated by the screens, feeling like a reference to the pull of the digital world and the countless hours young people like Brian spend seeking something of meaning in an environment of empty promises. Multi-layered lines repeating chat room requests and responses, the voices build to a disorienting swirl. In these moments, the marriage of precocity, tradition, and progressivism felt too immense to not hold your breath.

 
 
by Rick Pender 11.15.2013
Posted In: Theater at 10:06 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
to do onstage 11-13 complete history of comedy dominic conti, austin tichenor and reed martin - reduced shakespeare company - photo john burgess

Stage Door: Theatre Large and Small

There's a fine community theater production of A Chorus Line at the Aronoff Center's Jarson-Kaplan Theater. It's by Cincinnati Music Theatre, and they've recruited a talented cast of dancers, singers and actors to tell the stories of 16 performers competing for roles in the chorus of a Broadway show. There are many fine performances in this show — the characters become known, one by one as they tell their stories, some humorous, some heartbreaking — but the show's greatest emotional wallop comes when they are all in synch, wearing glitter and gold, hats cocked and performing as "One." Final performance is Saturday evening. Tickets: 513-621-2787.

If you prefer your theater small and intimate, you might want to head to the tiny Clifton Performance Theater on Ludlow, just east of the business district. Untethered Theater opens a production of Wendy MacLeod's The House of Yes tonight for a three-week run. It's a very dark comedy about a dysfunctional family obsessed with the Kennedys. I haven't seen this one, but it's a solid script and the young Untethered company has a good track record of interesting shows. Through Dec. 7. Tickets: 513-939-0599.

If you are in the mood for something totally silly, I can recommend the Cincinnati Playhouse's presentation of The Complete History of Comedy (Abridged) that opened last evening. (It has a long run, through the holidays, closing on Dec. 29.) It's a world premiere by the same guys who created The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) and other works — several presented at the Playhouse — comically condensing subject matter like the Bible, great literature and American history. These guys are the originators of this material, so it's a special treat to see them at work. If you’ve enjoyed Shakespeare (abridged), you’ll find this right up your alley. The performers are truly adept jokesters, physical shtick, music, improv — they can do it all. … Also, the Playhouse's excellent production of the legendary Kander & Ebb musical Cabaret winds up on Saturday evening. (CityBeat review here.) By now, most of the subscribers have attended, so you might be able to call at the last-minute and get a ticket. Marcia Milgrom Dodge's production traces back to the roots of the show, adhering closely to the stories of Berlin in the 1920s that inspired the show. Worth seeing. Playhouse box office: 513-421-3888.

CityBeat's other reviewer, Stacy Sims, really enjoyed the production of the farce Boeing Boeing at the Carnegie by CCM Drama. (CityBeat review here.) It's about a Casanova in Paris who's careful juggling of three flight attendances to whom he's engaged goes awry when Trans-Atlantic flights happen faster thanks to new aircraft. Silly but obviously a lot of fun. Through Nov. 24. Tickets: 859-957-1940.
 
 
by Drew Klein 11.14.2013
Posted In: Performance Art at 02:47 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
disabled-theater_credit ursula kaufmann

REVIEW: Performa 13 (Part Two)

CAC performance curator Drew Klein reports from arts biennial in NYC

Another Performa show, another mesmerizing experience. But we'll get to that.

While my nights are reserved for performances, the days allow me an opportunity to put some miles on my MTA card, shuttling around the city to meet people in various outposts. Wednesday morning saw me grab breakfast and coffee with artist Roberto Lange, a frequent Cincinnati visitor under the guise of Helado Negro. Roberto has a long history working with Cincinnati's own Paul Coors on various projects over a number of years, and Helado Negro's packed performance at MOTR Pub closed this past edition of Midpoint. A graduate of Savannah College of Art and Design, Roberto's creative output is not limited to the standard write/record/tour process, and his vision for future projects across various mediums was exciting to talk about.

Another meeting of note was a jump across Fort Greene to the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) to sit down with Joseph Melillo, executive producer of BAM overseeing artistic direction over the esteemed organization and its venues. Our chat nearly didn't happen as our CAC email had been out of service for the past 24 hours (work traveler's worst nightmare realized) and all emails to me were bouncing back. Thankfully everything got up and running just before the one window of opportunity and we were able to connect The operational realities of the performance programs at BAM and the CAC may be very different, but the conversation on our shared ideologies and the approach to the work we program was inspirational and left me feeling energized for the performance I was heading to immediately thereafter.

Quickly grabbing dinner to go (a cubano sandwich, for those interested), I made my way to Chelsea and New York Live Arts, a venue dedicated to movement-based artistry that was created in 2011 by a merger of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and Dance Theater Workshop. Tonight's performance was the much-discussed Disabled Theater, a collaboration between French choreographer Jérôme Bel and Zurich's Theater HORA, a company of actors with learning disabilities. Debated and praised all over Europe after its premiere at dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany, the work sees the actors' conditions and their (dis)abilities laid bare as they remain onstage for the duration of the performance as they respond, often with humor, to a series of tasks proposed by Bel.
A translator to the side of the stage began by addressing the crowd. The actors only speak Swiss German fluently, so she would be our guide. Each of the ten actors individually came out to stand in front of the audience for one minute. Even with this task, you began to learn about their conditions, their strengths and their fears. The actors ranged in age from 20 to 43. Some suffered from more severe or noticeable conditions than others. Asked to name their disability, some were fully aware of their diagnosed reality while others were limited to describing themselves as “slower than normal”.

The main focus of the night was the dance routines, with the actors selecting the music, choreographing and then performing their own pieces. One by one, they would jump up when their name was called, taking the opportunity to show their moves and completely invest in the moment. With each new dance different questions would come to mind, as well as a new awareness of what expectations or preconceptions I might generally have had of artists — and people — with disabilities. Essentially, these actors were just being themselves, out in front, onstage, mostly without concern for how the audience was feeling. There were moments, however, in which we see that these actors have had experiences whereby they feel different from the so-called “normal people”. In one heartbreaking instance, a young, energetic girl with Down syndrome informed us of her disability when prompted, said “I am sorry,” and rushed back to her chair in tears, straight into the arms of a consoling friend.

With Disabled Theater, Bel has made the notion of disability commonplace. The idiosyncrasies, weaknesses and natural gestures of the performers are displayed free of outside influence, allowing each audience member to accept and appreciate the artists as they would any other. An honest, highly impressive look at how we relate to a group typically viewed under a different lens.

Follow citybeat.com for more Performa 13 updates from Drew Klein. Read Part One here.

 
 
by Drew Klein 11.13.2013
Posted In: Performance Art at 03:48 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ryanmcnamara2

REVIEW: Performa 13 (Part One)

CAC performance curator Drew Klein reports from arts biennial in NYC

Arriving in New York for a work-related trip always causes my nerves to stand at full attention. I typically overcomplicate my schedule with back-to-back caffeine dates in different neighborhoods, or try and sneak in one more performance than would be wise. At the same time, I know when I'm back here that I'm going to be seeing some of the most forward-thinking live art happening in the world today, and the energy and inspiration I pull from the shows I see and the people I meet will influence my programming for seasons to come.

One layover, a two-hour delay and an annoying navigation out of Newark Airport later, I'm in the city and frantically sprinting to my first pow wow of the week with artist Hisham Bharoocha. Hisham is highly regarded for his music, visual art and photography, though I'm talking with him mainly in regard to the former. A founding member of the group Black Dice, his recent experiences have seen him organize the now legendary BOADRUM experiences in which 77 and, later, 88 drummers played the same number of kits on the dates 07/07/07 and 08/08/08, respectively, as well as other projects utilizing the two main parts of his live creative output — voice and percussion. Hisham owns a unique ability to take a live concept and build it into something visceral yet magical, and I was glad to find that I enjoyed him as a human being as well. I hate bad coffee dates.

However, the main reason for being in New York this time of year is Performa 13, the performance art biennial hosted at various venues around the city that runs for 24 days in November. Started in 2005 by art historian RoseLee Goldberg (she has written a book on performance art and is now revered as a key figure in that world), Performa presents some of today's most compelling performance art works and, more famously, commissions new work from reputable artists who work across various mediums — artists ranging from Carlos Amorales to Japanther to Ragnar Kjartansson. Earlier performances this month have featured Dean Spunt of No Age, a Contemporary Arts Center performer this past September, and C. Spencer Yeh, the longtime Cincinnati resident and noise art maestro whose visual art exhibition Standard Definition opened at the CAC in October 2009. My experience two years ago at Performa 11 introduced me to a rough working of Jace Clayton's Julius Eastman Memorial Dinner, and that serendipitous event lead to the project being further developed and realized before its world premiere as a production-in-full in our performance program this past April.

The first experience I had with Performa 13 will be hard to beat, I imagine. Arriving at the quaint Connelly Theater Ryan McNamara's MEƎM: A Story Ballet About The Internet, the attendants were instructed to check all coats and bags at the entrance before entering what served as a sort of waiting room of art school students, seasoned performance art patrons and those seeking something out of the ordinary. The room resembled a high school cafeteria in look and ambiance, filled with social chatter between friends and colleagues. As I paid little attention to the conversations, I went into the performance completely unaware of what would happen.


After being lead into an auditorium with standard seating facing an elevated stage, the program began with three male dancers contorting their bodies slowly and precisely to a modern dance Pop soundtrack. Not long into the routine it became clear that “something” was happening directly behind the audience. Too unbothered to turn around and take my attention from the stage, I heard small laughs and continued to feel like the program was turning into something entirely new. As the energy picked up around me, I finally glanced back and for the first time noticed that nearly all of the rows behind me were no longer there, and that two other dancers had set up shop in the back corners of the room and portions of the audience were now seated, in the same chairs, facing those performances. At the same time, two audience members appeared in their chairs moving up the ramps at the sides of the stage, being pulled by two production team members. Before too long, my own chair was lifted up and I was swiftly carted, passing through one room with three leotard-adorned dancers moving to strobe-affected disco before being delivered to a room where two women in matching outfits performed a laconic dance to a playlist of suspenseful film score pieces. This routine continued for an hour, with roughly 10 minutes spent at each location. At the end, after we were all put back in what we thought were our resting positions, there was still time for one final, beautiful, balletic piece. Then our chairs were forcefully reconfigured, and our expectations were once again turned upside down.

The music was mostly modern, referencing pop culture, and the dance routines were pulled (stolen) from popular internet videos. The anxiety over being completely unable to control your own attention, while still desperately attempting to, was incredibly effective in highlighting the performance's entire concept of questioning the very possibility of a singular “experience” today. There were roughly 10-12 possible positions, and each person probably experienced no more than six of those. We all wanted to catch more of what was happening all around, but often ignored what was right in front us. In the end, nobody seemed to leave feeling like they didn't get to experience it all.

Follow citybeat.com for more Performa 13 updates from Drew Klein.

 
 
by Jac Kern 11.13.2013
Posted In: Visual Art, Arts community at 09:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 
1002638_10151948882978965_599207823_n

UPDATE: Cork 'N Bottle Removes London Police Mural

Decision made one day after BLDG's Mike Amann passed away

UPDATE: Cork ‘N Bottle has reached out to BLDG and the public to apologize for the removal of The London Police mural made possible by BLDG and Mike Amann, who passed away Sunday.

Cork ‘N Bottle’s Tim Hue met with BLDG owners to apologize for the unfortunate timing of the mural removal. The company says it will donate $1,000 to the American Cancer Society in Mike Amann’s name and work to bring The London Police back to Covington to create a new mural. Both the gallery and Cork ‘N Bottle shared the news on social media.

From BLDG’s Facebook page:

“Excellent update on the Cork-N-Bottle and The London Police - Official mural situation:
We just had an excellent meeting with Tim Hue from Cork N Bottle issuing a formal apology along with a gracious $1,000 donation to the American Cancer Society on behalf of Mike Amann.
We fully accept this apology along with Tim's eagerness to correct the situation. We will be working with Tim and Cork N Bottle on replacing the mural in a timely fashion.
Also, we would like to state that the unfortunate timing of the event was in no way intended to be malicious or insensitive in any way.
Thank you Cork N Bottle for doing the right thing for the City of Covington and our community.”

Cork ‘N Bottle also reached out to fans on their page:

“We understand and sincerely regret the hurt that the removal of the art mural has caused our community. We acted out of a concern of a Maker’s Mark copyright violation – which we feared might affect our relationship with a key supplier. We certainly had no intention of offending The London Police - Official, BLDG or the community who had come to appreciate and enjoy the mural. We have been a part of this community for 50 years and as always, wish to work in the best interest for our community's development and growth. We regret the loss of this piece of art, and thank you for your comments and your enthusiasm for Covington. We too share your passion for our neighborhood and love being a part of this community. In furtherance of our sincere apologies, Cork 'N Bottle has made a donation in the name and memory of Michael T. Amann to The American Cancer Society. We invite others to join us.”

ORIGINAL POST: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12

The London Police mural on the side of Covington’s Cork ‘N Bottle has been removed by the liquor store.

British street artists TLP came to Greater Cincinnati this August as part of a collaboration with Covington’s BLDG. The London Police created one large mural and several smaller graffiti works across Covington during their two-week stay. Cork ‘N Bottle owners, according to BLDG, agreed to keep one of the works on the side of their building for at least one year. The mural was removed Monday.

From BLDG’s Facebook Page:

Huge loss in Covington today. Cork 'N Bottle decided to paint over their The London Police - Official mural today. Let us state that the agreement of the mural being painted on the building was that the painting would be up for at least a year after completion. From this point forward, we will surely only shop at The Party Source for all our spirits!”

This decision comes just a day after BLDG owner Mike Amann passed away Sunday after a battle with stage four neuroendocrine cancer.

Friends of Amann and fans of the artwork reached out to Cork ‘N Bottle on Facebook for an explanation. The liquor store posted the following statement this morning.

The London Police mural was removed from our building at 501 Crescent Ave. yesterday. The reasons for this are that the contract to have it painted was unauthorized and the image was an infringement on the Maker’s Mark trademarked bottle image. Please look for new art coming this spring as a new mural is being properly contracted.”

This blog will be updated when more information becomes available.

 
 
by Rick Pender 11.08.2013
Posted In: Arts community, Theater, Visual Art at 11:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door blog 11-8 - drew pulver as tevye human race - photo scott j. kimmins

Stage Door: Choices Galore

I had occasion to be in downtown Dayton on business earlier this week and thought I'd stay for the evening to catch the Human Race Theatre Company's production of Fiddler on the Roof at the Loft Theatre. It's not a space you'd immediately think of for this often large-scale show, but director Kevin Moore has put of lot of action and choreography (by Chris Crowthers) on the stage, centering on Drew Pulver as the philosophical Jewish milkman, Tevye. He's the show's charismatic core, but he's surrounded by a strong cast who really embody their roles. Wandering on and off the stage, a four-musician band, including George Abud as the expressive fiddler, ably accompanies the cast, several of whom play multiple roles. The intimacy of the Loft amplifies the heartfelt nature of the show, and the actors pour heart and soul into the joyous storytelling. This production runs through Nov. 30, so you have time to plan a trip to Dayton yourself. If you're a fan of musicals, you won't be disappointed. Tickets: 937-228-3630

If you're looking for a good musical closer to home, I can certainly recommend the Cincinnati Playhouse production of Cabaret, which gets my Critic's Pick in the current issue (see review here). Director Marcia Milgrom Dodge has taken it back to 1929 with costumes and choreography very true to the period in a seedy, sexy Berlin nightclub. The Playhouse doesn't often do musicals, but this one is done right. Tickets: 513-421-3888

Know Theatre is staging another work by Mike Bartlett. Last spring it was Cock; this time it's Bull (review here). It's a story of two people bullying a third as they compete for jobs. A nasty tale, not for the faint-hearted, but some fine writing and acting. You'll feel ashamed of yourself for enjoying it, I suspect. Tickets: 513-300-5669

A fine production of John Steinbeck's Depression era tale of migrant workers and a guy who just doesn't fit in, Of Mice and Men (review here), finishes its run this weekend at Cincinnati Shakespeare. Jeremy Dubin's performance as cranky George and Jim Hopkins as simpleminded Lenny are examples of the kind of fine acting that's a regular commodity at Cincy Shakes. Tickets: 513-381-2273

Finally, if you're in the mood for a hilarious farce, your destination should be the Carnegie in Covington. CCM Drama has transported some of its actors from the UC Campus to Covington, Ky., for a production of a deliriously funny tale of one man in Paris juggling three fiancees, Boeing Boeing. They're all flight attendants, but advances in aviation screw up his neat schedule to keep them discreet from one another. Comedy ensues. Tickets: 859-957-1940

 
 
by Rick Pender 11.01.2013
Posted In: Theater at 08:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
onstage 11-6 - flashdance -photo_by_jeremy_daniel

Stage Door: Musicals Galore

If you love musicals, you should run, don’t walk to the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music this weekend for the short run of Singin’ in the Rain. It's a fabulous recreation of the iconic 1952 movie that featured Gene Kelly. It's about the transition from silent to talking pictures in the late 1920s. Even if you’ve never seen the film, I’m bet you know Kelly’s iconic splash down a movie-set street, joyously stomping in puddles and swinging from a lamppost. That's what's onstage at Corbett Auditorium — a whole stage full of tap dancers and a torrential rainfall! But it's only there through Sunday afternoon; shows at CCM seldom run more than one weekend. So if you want to see this one, call for tickets right away: 513-556-4183.

There's water falling on another stage right now: The touring production of Flashdance: The Musical is at the Aronoff through Nov. 10, and its star, Jenny Mueller as the free-spirited welder who aspires to be a dancer concludes the first act with a memorable sequence where she performs at a club, culminating in a backlit shower. Mueller is a fine dancer and onstage from start to finish, but the show is full of shallow characters and too many subplots that make for slow going. Tickets: 800-982-2787.

One more musical item: I gave the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park's production of Cabaret a Critic's Pick, and it's definitely worth seeing. Despite the fact that it first appeared on Broadway 50 years ago, it's still a powerful piece of theater — about intolerance and willful ignorance. But it's framed in a great story with a memorable score by John Kander and Fred Ebb (who also created Chicago, Kiss of the Spider Woman and more) with a new production by Broadway veteran Marcia Milgrom Dodge. Tickets: 513-421-3888.

If you're in the mood for something more serious, there are plenty of choices that have received good reviews: Check out Cincinnati Shakespeare's staging of Of Mice and Men or their joint project with Xavier University of The Crucible. Tickets: 513- 381-2273, x1. And I hope you have on your radar Know Theatre's staging of Bull (which runs throughout November) by Mike Bartlett, the same playwright who wrote Cock, presented last spring. It opens tonight. Tickets: 513-300-5669.

Find reviews of Flashdance, Cabaret, Of Mice and Men and The Crucible at citybeat.com. 

 
 
by Rick Pender 10.25.2013
Posted In: Theater at 09:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cabaret

Stage Door: 'Cabaret' and Halloween Fare

The Cincinnati Playhouse's production of Cabaret is a must-see for anyone who is a fan of musicals. (CityBeat review here.) Kander and Ebb's Tony Award winner from the late '60s has been brought to the main stage with inventive verve by veteran Broadway choreographer and director Marsha Milgrom Dodge. Sure, it's set in 1929 Berlin, populated by amoral entertainers and Nazis rising to power. But its scrutiny of prejudice and bigotry in the context of jaunty, thoughtless entertainment is a fascinating way to bring attention to topics that are timeless. Dodge has assembled a cast of triple-threats (who can sing, act and dance), given them choreography rooted in the 1920s, costumed them in period clothing (and some clever get-ups for the cabaret routines) and set them spinning on a stage arrayed with Expressionist imagery. It's a winning combination. Cabaret just opened on Thursday evening; you have until Nov. 16 to catch it, but it's likely to be a hot ticket, so this is a good weekend to head to Mount Adams. The other choice at the Playhouse, Seven Spots on the Sun, is in its final weekend on the Shelterhouse stage. It's a powerful drama set in a Latin American nation, torn asunder by civil war. Serious theatergoers have been giving this one a thumbs-up. Tickets: 513-421-3888.

Cincinnati Shakespeare hasn't gotten around to any Shakespeare plays yet this season, but no one's complaining. Last weekend they opened a moving production of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, featuring top-notch performances by Jeremy Dubin and Jim Hopkins as a pair of Depression Era migrant works who have to stay one step ahead of trouble because man-child Lennie (Hopkins) doesn't know his own strength and has emotions that are seldom reined in. Great acting, worth seeing. (CityBeat review here.) Through Nov. 10. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1.

Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati finishes its run of Gina Gionfriddo's Rapture, Blister, Burn this weekend, hot from Broadway in its regional premiere. (CityBeat review here.) A story about modern women and what satisfies — and dissatisfies — them. Three generations end up debating choices made: It's both entertaining and thought-provoking, a showcase of excellent local actors. Through Sunday. Tickets: 513-421-3555.

As Halloween draws closer, you might want to check out a show or two inspired by the "season." Dracula at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts (tickets: 513-241-6550) tells the familiar tale of the legendary vampire. (CityBeat review here.) Slasher at Falcon Theatre (Monmouth Theatre in Newport; tickets 513-479-6783) is a tongue-in-cheek piece that originated a few years back at the Humana Festival in Louisvile. It's about people making a horror flick and how it affects their lives. Lots of humor, but some thoughtful moments, too.
 
 

 

 

 
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